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 Dish of the Day - II

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Temperance
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyTue 31 Mar 2020, 11:20

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 Blackpool_kiss_me_quick_hat_travel_train_poster-r7997ec43017a422aa5b912ae4470b41f_67fm5_540

Eat your heart out, Magritte.
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Meles meles
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyTue 31 Mar 2020, 11:23

Et le fish and chips n'est pas inconnu à Paris:

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 Fish-and-chips

... albeit with mayonnaise or sauce tartare rather than malt vinegar.


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Nielsen
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyTue 31 Mar 2020, 11:24

Vulgarity: I was thinking of me, sitting in my wheelchair in a speedo, and a T-shirt with the picture of six spermatory and a text spread over a broad belly - 'The winner of the swimming team - once!'


I'd better get me coat before someone eats my hat out.


Crossed posts.


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Temperance
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyTue 31 Mar 2020, 11:24

What are those slices of lemon and lime doing next to the Parisian attempt at fish 'n' chips!? Honestly! A squirt of Heinz Tomato Sauce is allowed (preferably from a tomato-shaped plastic container), but none of that posh citrus garnish nonsense, please!
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyTue 31 Mar 2020, 12:04

Of course, Temperance, I had to do some quick research, you know me. 
What I learn here new everyday on this site, especially from you...

https://everything2.com/title/Kiss+me+quick%252C+squeeze+me+slowly%2521

And I found it also in a thesis about
The literary depiction of English everyday life from Margaret Tatcher's rise to power to the fall  of new labour in the works of Sue Townsed.
http://e-spacio.uned.es/fez/eserv/tesisuned:ED-Pg-Filologia-Nmingo/MINGO_IZQUIERDO_Nievesde.pdf

One can it perhaps read during his "confinement" Wink . I see that the word exists also in English. Yes all those sophisticated French words, English people borrowed from the French... Embarassed...that teasing is not worth of me...

Kind regards from Paul.


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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyMon 06 Apr 2020, 10:50

6 April 1320 - The Declaration of Arbroath.

Until the last quarter of the 13th century the relationship between the nations of England and Scotland was one of relatively harmonious coexistence, with the Kings of Scotland paying hommage to English kings only for titles and possessions they held in England. But with the ascession of Edward I in 1272 England was now ruled by a more aggressive monarch with a clearly colonial attitude towards both Wales and Scotland.

Scotland under King Alexander III had seen a period of peace and economic stability, but on 19 March 1286, Alexander died after falling from his horse. The heir to the throne was Alexander's granddaughter, Margaret, Maid of Norway. As she was still a child and in Norway, the Scottish lords set up a government of guardians, and then Margaret fell ill on the voyage to Scotland and died in Orkney on 26 September 1290. The lack of a clear heir led to a period known as Competitors for the Crown of Scotland or the "Great Cause", with several families laying claim to the throne. With Scotland threatening to descend into civil war, King Edward I of England was invited by the Scottish nobility to arbitrate. However before the process could begin, he insisted that all of the contenders recognise him as Lord Paramount of Scotland. In early November 1292, at a great feudal court held in the castle at Berwick-upon-Tweed, judgement was finally given in favour of John Balliol having the strongest claim in law.

Edward proceeded to reverse the rulings of the Scottish Lords and even summoned King John Balliol to stand before the English court as a common plaintiff. John renounced his homage in March 1296 and by July, Edward had forced him to abdicate. Edward then instructed his officers to receive formal homage from some 1,800 Scottish nobles and that they provide military service in the war against France. This was unacceptable; instead the Scots formed an alliance with France and launched an unsuccessful attack on Carlisle.

Edward responded by invading Scotland in 1296 and taking the town of Berwick-upon-Tweed in a particularly bloody attack and at the Battle of Dunbar, Scottish resistance was effectively crushed. The campaign had been very successful, but the English triumph would only be temporary. Throughout Scotland, there was widespread discontent and disorder after the dominion exercised by the English Crown, and acts of defiance were directed against local English officials. In 1297, the country erupted in open revolt, and Andrew de Moray and William Wallace emerged as the first significant Scottish patriots with Wallace winning a significant victory of English forces at Stirling Bridge in 1297. Nevertheless Edward I and then his son Edward II continued to try and assert their dominance over Scotland.

In 1306 Robert the Bruce seized the Scottish throne and began a long struggle to secure his position against internal and external threats. His success at Bannockburn in 1314, when he defeated an English army under Edward II, was a major achievement, but the English still did not recognise Scotland's independence or Bruce's position as king. Furthermore on the European front, Scottish relations with the papacy were also in crisis after the Scots defied papal efforts to establish a truce with England, resulting in the Papal excommunication of King Robert  and three of his barons in 1320.

It was amid these events that the Declaration of Arbroath was a formal letter addressed to Pope John XXII which was drawn in Arbroath Abbey by Bernard of Kilwinning , then Chancellor of Scotland and Abbot of Arbroath, and sealed by fifty-one magnates and nobles. It constituted King Robert I's response to his excommunication for disobeying the pope's demand in 1317 for a truce in the First War of Scottish Independence. The letter asserted the antiquity of the independence of the Kingdom of Scotland, denouncing English attempts to subjugate it and was  thus intended to assert Scotland's status as an independent, sovereign state and defend Scotland's right to use military action when unjustly attacked.

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 Declaration-of-arbroath
The Declaration of Arbroath in the National Records of Scotland.

The Declaration made a number of points: that Edward I of England had unjustly attacked Scotland and perpetrated atrocities; that Robert the Bruce had delivered the Scottish nation from this peril; and, most controversially, that the independence of Scotland was the prerogative of the Scottish people, rather than the King of Scots. (However this should be taken in the context of the time - ‘Scottish People’ refers to the Scottish nobility, rather than commoners.) In fact it stated that the nobility would choose someone else to be king if Bruce proved to be unfit in maintaining Scotland's independence. Whatever the true motive, the idea of a contract between King and people was advanced to the Pope as a justification for Bruce's coronation over John de Balliol's claim because Balliol had proven incapable of protecting the Scottish people. For his part the Pope accepted the points in the Declaration and wrote to Edward II urging him to make peace, although it wasn't until 1328 that the Pope finally acknowledged Scotland's independence.

So, for today I suggest something using Arbroath smokies: hot-smoked haddock fillets from the town of Arbroath in Angus.

The Arbroath smokie is said to have originated in the small fishing village of Auchmithie, three miles northeast of Arbroath. Local legend has it a store caught fire one night, destroying barrels of haddock preserved in salt. The following morning, it was found that some of the barrels had caught fire, thereby cooking the haddock inside, and further inspection revealed that the haddock was not just palatable but delicious, and so the idea caught on. However it is much more likely that idea was actually introduced from Scandinavia where similar to hot smoking methods are still employed. To make Arbroath smokies, the fish are first salted overnight, then tied in pairs using hemp twine, and left for another night to dry. Once they have been salted, tied and dried, they are hung over a triangular length of wood to smoke over smouldering hardwood chippings, covered over with a wooden half barrels and sealed with wet jute sacking. All of this serves to create a very hot, humid and smoky fire. The intense heat and thick smoke is essential if the fish are to be cooked, not burned, and to have the traditional strong, smoky taste after less than an hour of smoking.

Smokies being hot-smoked, are ready cooked, and so can be eaten just as they are, hot from the smoker or warmed up with boiling water or under a grill, and with a bit of butter on top. However they can be used in more involved dishes. Cullen skink is a soup traditionally made from Finnan haddie - that is cold-smoked haddock (which unlike an Arbroath smoky needs to be cooked) but it can be made using Arbroath smokies which impart a slightly stronger smokier flavour, but whatever you do just don't use any of the lurid yellow dyed stuff sold in supermarkets.

Cullen skink is one of Britain's best soups: a full-flavoured, hearty and comfortingly creamy soup of smoked haddock, potato and leek all poached in milk. Cullen is, of course, a small fishing town on the Moray Firth, an inlet popular with haddock, while the Oxford Companion to Food says that skink is a variation of the German "schinke", or ham, denoting a shin specifically: so the archetypal skink is a soup made from shin of beef. Cattle perhaps being more valuable than fish in coastal regions, the locals around the Moray Firth adapted the idea to suit their own ingredients.

I looked in Margaret (Meg) Dodd's 'Cook and Housewife's Manual' published in Edinburgh in 1829, which has numerous traditional Scottish recipes, but unfortunately she doesn't have one for cullen skink. So for a recipe there's this very comprehensive one in The Guardian:

The Guardian - Felicity Cloake - how to cook the perfect cullen skink-

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 Cullen-Skink

There was to have been a major exhibition this summer by the National Records of Scotland to mark the 700th anniversary of the Declaration of Arbroath, but due to covid-19 this has been postponed.


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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyMon 06 Apr 2020, 11:25

Your dishes of the day are always informative, Mm. I'm trying to be a bit resourceful andwas thinking of trying to make paneer nut i have half fat milk and i tjink maybe you need full fat
I don t think that qualifies necessarily as a jistorical matter.  Sorry abouttypos - on phone.
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyMon 06 Apr 2020, 11:49

As you say I think paneer is usually made from full fat milk, but it would probably still work with half fat, although I guess that would just be wetter, and so need more whey to be squeezed out. However you could try adding some dried milk powder to your half-fat milk, to boost up the fat content ... I've done that when making yoghurt. I don't really have much experience of making paneer but maybe Priscilla knows how it's done. Although what exactly all this has to do with the Declaration of Arbroath or the history of Cullen skink is anyone's guess.
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyThu 09 Apr 2020, 08:52

9 April 1865 - one of the last battles of the American Civil War was fought at the village of Appomattox Court House in Virginia, where the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia under the command of General Robert E. Lee, were defeated by the Union Army of the Potomac under the Command of Ulysses S. Grant. Lee's army was cut off from resupply or retreat and he was forced to surrender - the document of surrender being signed in the parlour of a private house in the village.

It was the first time the two men men had seen each other face-to-face in almost two decades. Suddenly overcome with sadness, Grant found it hard to get to the point of the meeting and instead the two generals briefly discussed their only previous encounter, during the Mexican–American War until Lee brought attention back to the issue at hand. The terms Grant offered were as generous as Lee could hope for; his men would not be imprisoned or prosecuted for treason. Officers were allowed to keep their sidearms, horses, and personal baggage. In addition to his terms, Grant also allowed the defeated men to take home their horses and mules to carry out the spring planting and provided Lee with a supply of food rations for his starving army. Lee never forgot Grant's magnanimity during the surrender, and for the rest of his life would not tolerate an unkind word about Grant in his presence.

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 General-Robert-E-Lee-surrenders-at-Appomattox-Court-House-1865
'Peace in Union.' The surrender of General Lee to General Grant at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, 9 April 1865. Lee, well-dressed in his customary uniform, was the first to arrive for the meeting and had to wait. Grant, besides conducting a battle all morning had also been to fighting a ferocious headache, but this had subsided when he arrived at the house, in a mud-spattered uniform, a government-issue sack coat, with trousers tucked into muddy boots, no sidearms, and with only his tarnished shoulder straps showing his rank.

On April 10, Lee gave his farewell address to his army, and then both commanders left to report to their respective governments. On April 12, a formal ceremony of parade marked the disbandment of the Army of Northern Virginia with the parole of its nearly 28,000 remaining officers and men, free to return home. As news spread of Lee's surrender other Confederate commanders realized that the strength of the Confederacy was gone, and so it triggered a series of surrenders across the South, in North Carolina, Alabama and finally Shreveport, Louisiana, for the Trans-Mississippi area in the West by June, signaling the end of the fighting.

After four years of war and numerous casualties cake may not be entirely appropriare fare but does suitably mark the final confontation and subsequent reconciliation between Lee and Grant. Like quite a number of other 19th century commanders and statemen, both had sweet dessert cakes named after them. These cakes are often claimed to have been a particular favourite of the gentleman concerned or to have been made to an old family recipe passed down the generations, although in fact the connections are often quite tenuous and the cake and recipe may simply have been so named as a fund-raising excerse, or just to cash in on their fame.

The Robert E. Lee Cake is traditionally believed to be a favorite of the Confederate general although this is difficult to confirm. Most sources date the first written version of Robert E. Lee Cake to 1879, but General Lee had already died in 1870.  The cake in question, an orange and lemon layer cake, while quite involved is fairly typical of southern-style baking, and it, or something similar was probably fimilar in the Lee household. There are many recipes and many versions in old southern cookbooks as the cake, with the association with General Lee,  was extremely popular in the nineteenth century.  No two authorities seem to agree on the egg content of the cake (ranging from eight to ten eggs) and the icing also varies with each recipe.

Here are two original recipes both taken from 'Housekeeping In Old Virginia; Contributions from Two Hundred and fifty of Virginia’s Noted Housewives,  Distinguished For Their Skill In The Culinary Art And Other Branches of Domestic Economy' (1879) edited by Marion Cabell Tyree:

Robert E. Lee Cake
Twelve eggs, their full weight in sugar, a half-weight in flour.  Bake it in pans the thickness of jelly cakes.  Take two pounds of nice "A" sugar, squeeze into it the juice of five oranges and three lemons together with the pulp; stir it in the sugar until perfectly smooth; then spread it on the cakes, as you would do jelly, putting one above another till the whole of the sugar is used up.  Spread a layer of it on top and on sides.  –  Mrs. G.


Gen. Robert Lee Cake
10 eggs.
1 pound sugar.
1/2 pound flour.
Rind of 1 lemon, and juice of 1/2 lemon.

Make exactly like sponge cake, and bake in jelly-cake tins.  Then take the whites of two eggs beat to a froth, and add one pound sugar, the grated rind and juice of one orange, or juice of half a lemon.  Spread it on the cakes before they are perfectly cold, and place one layer on another.  This quantity makes two cakes.  – Mrs. I. H.


General Graant's favourite was apparently gingerbread cake, the recipe for which was originally the creation of Lucy Latimer, an African-American pastry chef who was hired by the Grants to work at the White House when he president. This has more provinence but again I cannot find the original Latimer recipe - perhaps she never wrote it down - nevertheless Lucy Latimer was undoubtedly a good cook as she went on to cook for four more presidential administrations after Grant's presidency ended.

So from, 'Mrs Goodfellow's Cookery as it should be: A manual for the dining room and kitchen' publ Philadelphia (1865), here are a few recipes for gingerbread cake from the year the Civil War ended:

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 Gingerbread  Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 Gingerbread-2
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyFri 10 Apr 2020, 10:40

10 April 1815 - Mount Tambora, a volcano on the island of Sumbawa in present-day Indonesia, then part of the Dutch East Indies, erupted: it was the most powerful volcanic eruption in human recorded history.

After several centuries of dormancy a sudden very large eruption occurred on 5 April 1815 which was heard up to 800km away, followed by several days of ash fall onto neighbourng islands. Then at about 7 pm on 10 April, the eruptions intensified and the whole mountain was observed to turn into a flowing mass of "liquid fire". What was first thought to be the sound of firing guns was heard on Sumatra, more than 2,600 kilometres away. Pumice stones and ash rained down on the surrounding islands and pyroclastic flows cascaded down the mountain to the sea wiping out the village of Tambora. The climax of the eruption was on the 10 and 11 April but smaller eruptions rumbled on for months.

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 Tambora-Vesuv
A size comparison of Tambora (main) with Vesuvius (inset).

The 1815 eruption of Tambora was the most powerful eruption in human recorded history: the energy release was equivalent to about 33 gigatons of TNT, while an estimated 40 cubic kilometres of material, weighing about 10 billion tonnes, was ejected. Mount Tambora, previously one of the highest peaks in the Indonesian archipeligo, lost roughly a third of its height. All vegetation on the island was destroyed with uprooted trees, mixed with pumice ash, washed out to sea to form thick rafts up to 5 kilometres across. A moderate-sized tsunami struck the shores of various islands throughout the archipelago on 10 April, with a height of up to 4 metres on coastlines directly facing the island, and up to 2m in height at further remove in East Java, and the Molucca Islands. The total death toll has been estimated to be around 4,600. The eruption column reached the stratosphere at an altitude of more than 43 kilometres.  The coarser ash particles settled out one to two weeks after the eruptions, but the finer ash particles,  stayed in the atmosphere for several years at altitudes of 10–30 kilometres and were dispersed around the world. The eruption also released up to about and up to 100 billion tones of SO2 into the atmosphere.

All this material in the atmoshere reduced sunlight and lowered global temperatures. In the spring and summer of 1815 a persistent fog was observed in the northeastern United States which dimmed the sunlight such that sunspots were visible to the naked eye, while in north and western Europe the summer was very cold and wet, although not abnormally so. The following year, however, the whole northern hemisphere suffered extreme weather conditions, dubbed the "Year Without a Summer", and this disruption continued for several years. Average global temperatures decreased by about 0.4 to 0.7 °C enough to cause significant agricultural problems around the globe. China, Europe, and North America had well-documented below normal temperatures, which devastated their harvests and lead to widespread famines. There was heavier than normal snowfall in the Alps and the extent of Arctic pack ice also increased. The monsoon season in China and India was altered, which, as well as causing failed harvests, caused flooding in the Yangtze Valley forcing the evacuation of thousands of people, as waell as contributing to the spread of a new strain of cholera that originated in Bengal in 1816. There were also typhus epidemics in southeast Europe and along the eastern Mediterranean Sea.

There were several other, less dramatic effects:
High levels of ash in the atmosphere led to unusually spectacular sunsets during this period, a feature celebrated in the paintings of J. M. W. Turner.

The lack of oats to feed horses may have inspired the German inventor Karl Drais to research new ways of horseless transportation, which led to the invention of the draisine or velocipede. This was the ancestor of the modern bicycle and a step toward mechanized personal transport.

In June 1816, "incessant rainfall" during that "wet, ungenial summer" forced Mary Shelley, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron and John William Polidori, and their friends to stay indoors at Villa Diodati overlooking Lake Geneva for much of their Swiss holiday. They decided to have a contest to see who could write the scariest story, leading Shelley to write Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus and Lord Byron to write "A Fragment", which Polidori later used as inspiration for The Vampyre – a precursor to Dracula.

There really can only be one dish to mark this event - tumpeng.

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 Tumpeng-2    Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 Tumpeng-3

Tumpeng is a cone-shaped rice dish made to resemble a volcano and served with various side dishes (vegetables and meat) originating from Javanese cuisine of Indonesia. The cone shape of rice is made by using a cone-shaped woven bamboo container. The rice itself could be plain steamed rice, uduk rice (cooked with coconut milk), or yellow rice (uduk rice colored with kunyit (turmeric)). The cone shaped rice is erected on a tampah (a rounded woven bamboo container) topped with banana leaf, and surrounded by assorted Indonesian dishes. Since 2014 it is the official national dish of Indonesia, being described as "the dish that binds the diversity of Indonesian various culinary traditions."

From wiki (re tumpeng):

"People in Java, Bali and Madura usually make tumpeng to celebrate important events. However, all Indonesians are familiar with tumpeng. The philosophy of tumpeng is related to the geographical condition of Indonesia, especially Java as fertile island with numerous mountains and volcanos. Tumpeng dates back to ancient Indonesian tradition that revered mountains as the abode of hyangs, the spirit of ancestors and gods. The cone-shaped rice meant to mimics the holy mountain. The feast served as a thanksgiving for the abundance of harvest or any other blessings."

There are several variants of tumpeng, served at different ceremonies.

Tumpeng Robyong – This kind of tumpeng is usually served at the traditional Javanese siraman (bridal shower). Tumpeng is placed on a bakul bamboo rice container and on top of the tumpeng is placed egg, shrimp paste, shallots and red chilli.
Tumpeng Nujuh Bulan – This kind of tumpeng is served in the seventh month of pregnancy prenatal ceremony. The tumpeng is made of plain white rice. The main tumpeng is surrounded by six smaller tumpeng, to create a total of seven tumpengs all erected on tampah covered with banana leaf.
Tumpeng Pungkur – Used in the ceremony for the death of a virgin or unmarried male or female. It is made from white rice surrounded only with vegetables dishes. The tumpeng later must be cut vertical in to two parts evenly and placed one against another.
Tumpeng Putih – White tumpeng, uses white rice since white color symbolize holiness in Javanese culture. This kind of tumpeng is employed in sacred ceremonies.
Tumpeng Nasi Kuning – Yellow tumpeng, the color yellow represents a heap of gold, wealth, abundance and high moral character. This kind of tumpeng is eaten at cheerful, happy festivities such as the celebration of birth, engagement, marriage, Eid, Christmas etc.
Tumpeng Nasi Uduk – Also called tumpeng tasyakuran. Uduk rice (rice cooked in coconut milk) is used in theMaulud Nabi ceremony, a ceremony celebrating the birthday of prophet Muhammad.


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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyTue 14 Apr 2020, 11:53

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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyTue 14 Apr 2020, 21:54

Thanks, Paul, I'll keep that for 6 August 1945. Now for today ...

14 April 1865 - the assassination of Abraham Lincoln by the well-known stage actor John Wilkes Booth, while the President and his wife were attending the play 'Our American Cousin' at Ford's Theatre in Washington, D.C.  Lincoln died the following morning.

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 Lincoln-s-assassination

Occurring near the end of the American Civil War, the assassination was part of a larger conspiracy intended by Booth to revive the Confederate cause by eliminating the three most important officials of the United States government. Conspirators Lewis Powell and David Herold were assigned to kill Secretary of State William H. Seward, and George Atzerodt was tasked with killing Vice President Andrew Johnson. Beyond Lincoln's death, the plot failed: Seward was only wounded and Johnson's would-be attacker lost his nerve. After a dramatic initial escape, Booth was killed at the climax of a 12-day manhunt. Powell, Herold, Atzerodt and Mary Surratt were later hanged for their roles in the conspiracy.

Lincoln's assasination occurred just five days after Battle of Appomattox Court House (featured above for 9 April 1865) when Robert E Lee surrended to the Union general Ulysses Grant. As mentioned in that post, many 19th century generals and statesmen had cakes named in their honour, often with it being claimed that the cake was their particular favourite. The links between the cake and it's celebrity are very often rather tenuous but for once Abraham Lincoln's 'personal' cake was actually something he regulatly ate and enjoyed.

Lincoln's wife, Mary Todd, was from a wealthy family of Lexington, Kentucky. While Lincoln had been brought up on the Kentucky frontier, the Todd family were used to the finer things in life and once having particularly enjoyed a French-style white almond cake supplied by a local caterer, they requested the recipe of him. Mary subsequently baked the same cake for Abraham Lincoln when they courted, he liked it (he once described it as "the best cake I ever ate") and she continued to bake it often when they were married.

His assassination on 14 April 1865, when he was barely into his second term profoundly shocked the country. The eponymous almond cake soon became something of a symbol of Lincoln and was quite often fepatured on civic or military banquet menus in the 1870s. The original recipe, or variations of it, continued to appear in newspapers and cookbooks for many decades, such as this one from 'The Saturday Evening Post' (USA) of 16 February 1957:

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 Lincolns-cake
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyWed 15 Apr 2020, 09:47

Thanks for another ACW recipe, MM. I immediately thought at "frangipane" "taartjes" (we, in our dialect make: "fransipanne" of it).
A favourite of my father and later bit-by-bit also of me...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frangipane

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 1024px-Gros_plan_de_galette_des_rois_2013
 

But with my "fransipannetaartjes" I meant rather this:

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 IMG_5924

And nowadays one can have them mostly witout rhum.

And of course one has to be in France for the recipe...

https://cuisine.journaldesfemmes.fr/recette/332875-galette-des-rois-frangipane

Kind regards, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyWed 15 Apr 2020, 11:45

Galette des rois, Koningentaart, ie kings' cake, is of course traditional for Epiphany, the kings in question being the three who brought gifts for Christ. In France/Spain it usually contains a dried broad bean, la fêve - or nowadays with bought ones a little ceramic novelty - and whoever gets the portion containing the bean is king- or queen-of-the-bean. French galette des rois, as your first picture shows, usually consists of flaky puff pastry layers with a dense center of frangipane, although in the west of France a sablé galette is often made with a sweetcrust pastry. Around here a different type of cake is often made, known as a gâteau des rois, usually as torus-shaped brioche with candied fruits and sugar, and encircled with a crenellated paper band to make it resemble a crown.

I rather think from the recipe, that Abe Lincoln's favourite cake was more like an iced/sugar-dusted almond brioche sponge cake, than a flaky-pastry frangipane galette, so more like this (which is a modern interpretation of a similar Lincoln's cake recipe here made into a ring rather like an Austrian/German bundt cake):

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 Lincoln-cake-2

@PaulRyckier wrote:
And nowadays one can have them mostly without rhum.

But where's the fun in that?
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyFri 17 Apr 2020, 11:20

Thanks for the reply about the "galette des rois", but to be honest I still prefer the "frangipane tartelettes" (frangipanetaartjes) that I mentioned in my former message.

http://www.delicesdemimm.com/archives/2016/10/25/34478676.html

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 113101684

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 113101686

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 113101688


Kind regards, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptySat 18 Apr 2020, 21:22

Just as a matter of interest the word, frangipane, for the sweet filling made of ground almonds, or at least with almond flavouring, is usually reckoned to be named after the Italian Frangipani family who were powerful Guelph supporters during the Middle Ages. They could trace their ancestry back to the 11th century but ultimately they claimed to be descended from the ancient Roman plebeian family of the Anicii. Their name, Frangipani, also written Frangipane, Freiapane, Fricapane or Fresapane, is generally supposed to derive from frangere il pane, or literally 'break the bread'.

However the earliest reference to an almond filling with this modern spelling with a 'g' seems to be from a confectioner's dictionary of 1732. Interestingly though, there is an earlier reference to a tart of 'franchipanne' in La Varenne’s' famous cookbook 'Le Cuisinier françois' of 1651. This recipe is also one of the earliest references to what one would now call a puff or choux pastry such as used in the classic galette des rois (the name choux, French for cabbage, refers to the tight, thin, cabbage-like layers of pastry). Despite the name, in La Varenne's recipe the filling itself is barely mentioned and certainly no particular flavour is specified. I wonder, did the recipe's name, franchipanne, actually refer to the innovative, millefeuille-type construction, rather than the filling? Anyway, whatever La Varenne meant by it, this is from the English translation of his book which was published in 1653 as 'The French Cook':

Tourte of franchipanne.
Take the fairest flower [flour] you can get, and allay it with the whites of eggs; presently take the twelfth part of your paste, and spread it until you may see through ti; butter your plate, or tourte panne, spread this first sheet, dresse it up, butter at the top, and doe the same to the number of six, then put what creame you will, and make the top as the bottome to the number of six sheets; bake your tourte leasurely; after it is baked, besprinkle it with water of flours, sugar it well and serve.

You must have a care to worke up your paste as soone as it is made, and because it drieth up sooner then you are aware, and when it is unusefull, because your sheets must be as thinne as cobwebs, therefore you must choose a moist place.


The word frangipane also denotes a genus of plants, now classified as plumeria named in honor of the seventeenth-century French botanist Charles Plumier. But frangipane is still a common name for these bushy plants which typically have large sweet-scented blooms, and it comes from the Marquis Muzio Frangipani of the Italian family mentioned above. He was a perfumer to Louis XIII who invented a perfume that was said at the time to resemble the odour of the recently discovered flowers. This may be how the sweet, almond-smelling, confectionary paste came to be known as frangipane. But also bear in mind that the similar sweet, almond-based paste, usually known as marzipan, mazapan, or marchpane in Middle English, has been known in Western Europe for nigh on one thousand years, having been introduced to Arabic Spain from the Middle East, from where, via Byzantium, it might also have spread independently into Eastern Europe.
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptySun 19 Apr 2020, 11:26

MM, thank you again for this further discussion of the word "frangipane". I will especially transmit to my wider circle (after the Corona lockdown) the comment about the Marquis Muzio Frangipane and his perfume (and there is my Louis XIII back of my Musketeer story).
And yes "almonds" in "Franchipane" and "Marchpane"...


Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 Qldk6nqhmtn8qepatwn5v0heyzoirzqqwbzj4ujxhsfwcd3bdwrdaqz9eveyxv26-


Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 Plumeria_1__66418.1494849844


Kind regards, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptySun 19 Apr 2020, 12:59

19 April 1839 - The Treaty of London of 1839 was signed between Great Britain, Austria, France, the German Confederation (led by Prussia), Russia, and the Netherlands - officially recognising the de facto independence of the Kingdom of Belgium. At Britain's insistence, under the treaty the European powers recognised and guaranteed the neutrality of Belgium with article VII specifically requiring Belgium to remain perpetually neutral and by implication committing the signatory powers to guard that neutrality in the event of invasion, thus the treaty became a cornerstone of European international law.

When on 31 July 1914 the Belgian Army mobilised in the face of Germany's demands for safe passage of its troops through Belgium in order to attack France (which the Germans alleged was about to advance into Belgium en route to attacking Germany in support of Russia), the Belgian King, Albert I, publicly called Europe's attention to the fact that  Germany, Great Britain and France were solemnly bound to respect and to defend the neutrality of his country in accordance with the 1839 Treaty. Informed by the British ambassador that Britain would go to war with Germany over the latter's violation of Belgian neutrality, the German Chancellor Theobald von Bethmann-Hollweg exclaimed that he could not believe that Britain and Germany would be going to war over a mere "scrap of paper". Germany invaded Belgium on 4 August and Britain promptly declared war the same day.

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 Scrap-of-paper
"The Scrap of Paper – Enlist Today", a British World War I recruitment poster of 1914.

Here's a suitable dish that should fit the bill rather well. Rabbit with prunes cooked in wine or beer is a typical Belgian dish enjoyed by both Flemish and Walloons, but here it's with the topical twist of being cooked as a parcel in 'a piece of paper' ie cooking parchment.

En papillote (French for "in a paper parcel") is a method of cooking in which the food is put into a folded pouch and then baked. The parcel is typically made from folded parchment paper, but other material, such as aluminium foil or big leaves of cabbage or banana etc, can obviously be used. The parcel holds in moisture so that when placed in an oven or on a hot surface, the food within the parcel is steamed, whether from its natural juices or from added fluid such as wine, stock, etc. It is often claimed that the idea of cooking this way was the invention of Antoine Alciatore, a French immigrant to New Orleans who in about 1840 created Pompano Montgolfier, honouring the brothers who had created the first balloons (the Mongolfiers were in the paper-making business and so made their pioneering hot-air balloons out of paper). With Alciatore's recipe a filet of pompano, (a tropical sea fish a bit like a snapper) is wrapped in paper with a sauce of white wine and crabmeat and then baked; the steam not only cooks the fish but puffs up the parchment, suggesting a hot air balloon. Antoine's recipe was certainly a speciality of his restaurant although the idea of cooking things wrapped in paper or other sheets of material such as leaves, of course goes back thousands of years.

Anyway here's a modern recipe for lapin aux pruneaux en papillote/papillot met konijn en pruimen, from the Belgian supermarket chain Delhaize.

In French:



In Flemish:

Delhaize - Papillot met konijn en pruimen

That looks very yummy. I've got a whole rabbit in the freezer as well as all the other ingredients, so I'm going to give that a go. It looks quick and easy to do and I should imagine is quite forgiving in terms of timing, so I might well add it to my regular repertoir. Rabbit, often cooked with thyme and raisins, is popular in Catalunya, and braising it with prunes is also a traditional way of preparing it in England, so I can see plenty of possibilities for adapting it to suit the occasion.


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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptySun 19 Apr 2020, 13:24

From Local Hero:

Urquhart  :  How's the casserole de lapin?

MacIntyre  :  Excellent.

Urquhart  :  Terrific. Thank you.

Oldsen  :   [thinking a moment]   Lapin? That's rabbit.

MacIntyre  :  Is this my rabbit?

Oldsen  :  Harry!

MacIntyre  :  Trudy!

Urquhart  :  We don't allow animals in the bedrooms, I should have told you sooner
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptySun 19 Apr 2020, 14:53

Thanks MM for your recipe of the lapin aux pruneaux en papillotte.

Overhere I have never seen rabit "en papilotte", from my restaurant remembrance it was more "salmon en papilotte?"
As overhere:
https://www.750g.com/recettes_saumon_en_papillote.htm
But here it is up to my remembrance, in aluminium foil and as I see it it is much much more easy to fold it Wink
 
And braised rabbit with plumes... in my souvenirs of childhood...my sister and I were most of our time (only during holidays at our home on the Belgian coast) "opgekweekt" (how difficult: it seems in Dutch only to refer to plants and all. Now I found: "grootbrengen" raise? bring up? and they translate also by the enigmatic "rear")
...up to our twelve by our grandmother (and mother from time to time in the house of grandmother and going to school overthere too)...

And nobody but our grandmother could prepare "gestoofd konijn met pruimen" (braised rabbit with plumes) like her



But in our grandmother's recipe there were never ever bacon slices added...as I see it the rabbit was much more baken...and it was a whole rabbit in pieces and the "head" was also included...and she added also peas and carrots...and two slices of bread..and one liter dark table beer and a lot of onions and a good "geut" (it seems to be Belgian Dutch and even in the Dutch "scheut" I find no translation: splash? gulp?) of vinegar...and when braised during two? hours the whole rabbit was continuously immerged within the sauce...my father ate from the rabbit head, but we put it in the dust bin...

Kind regards, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptySun 19 Apr 2020, 16:06

@PaulRyckier wrote:
Overhere I have never seen rabit "en papilotte", from my restaurant remembrance it was more "salmon en papilotte?"...

Me neither and I agree cooking en papillote is more usually used for delicate things like fish, but the Delhaize recipe was just too good to miss to commemorate the 1839 "scrap of paper". Your grandmother's recipe sounds much like my mother's for braised/stewed rabbit with prunes, cooked in a covered pot/casserole although with stock rather than beer and she did usually added lardons/bacon bits, plus as you say, a good "scheut" (in English a 'splash' is a good word, or maybe a 'glug' or 'slosh') of vinegar or sometimes sharp cider. The rabbits were usually farm-reared but during the war, when my mother learned her cooking skills from her mother, the rabbits would probably often have been wild (granny raised chickens at home but not rabbits) and so rather tougher needing a long, slow cooking and not at all suitable for steaming en papillote. Rabbits here in France usually come whole with the head still on, but I usually remove it before cooking: Doggy-Dog always claims that as his traditional 'perk' which he happily crunches up whole (uncooked bones of rabbit or chicken are OK as they are flexible but cooked bones are stiff and can be dangerous).
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyTue 21 Apr 2020, 10:23

Thank you very much MM for your story about your "mother's rabbit recipe". There over the channel there seems to be not that much difference with our Belgian kitchen. At least for that "item"  Wink...
OOPS and I forgot the story of the rabbit head (keunekop/konijnekop)...

MM, I learned today, one has still to learn being more than three times 25 (although the feeling (of the mind!) is still 25) about banana bread.

From my search it seems to come from South-East Asia...I hope you can once use it in one of your historical event recipes...

https://bestinau.com.au/banana-bread-recipe/



But no cinnamon for us here in the Flemish region (former county of Flanders) as some 20 miles further in The Netherlands. 
Cinnamon in their pancakes...bah...and sugar in their mayonaise as the Germans...bah...

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyWed 22 Apr 2020, 08:53

Thanks for the article Paul. I touched on bananas and banana bread on 'Dish of the Day page 5 for 10 April 1633 – the first reference to a fresh banana in Britain'. Fresh imported bananas and hence recipes to deal with them as they have a very short shelf life, appeared first in the Americas as they were closer to the main growing regions in the Caribbean and so fast steamships could get them to markets in the north-east US before they perished (bananas not being amenable to either freezing or canning). Even so, as your article says, banana cake/bread recipes really only became popular in the 1930s with the ready availability of baking powder, nevertheless in that post I included an American recipe for banana cake from much earlier, taken from 'Mrs. Rorer’s New Cook Book' (1902) - and she didn't add cinnamon either.
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyThu 23 Apr 2020, 23:12

23 April 1661 (St George's Day) - and the coronation of King Charles II.

Other than that the total cost of the coronation banquet was £1209 15s 7 ½d - a hefty sum for the time - I can't find many details of what was eaten. Samuel Pepys was there but although he describes the event he barely mentions the food itself. He certainly wasn't on the guest-list, but nevertheless while his wife watched on from the public stands, he somehow managed to wander from table to table ogling the distinguished guests, and then sat down in a corner to eat the loaf of bread, four rabbits and a pullet, that he'd managed to purloin from the diners. He was not alone in this as in his own words, "everybody else did [eat] what they could get".

St George's Day is also the traditional date for the start of the English asparagus season. Asparagus (or sparrow-grass, sparagi, perage, sperach, sparage, asparage, sparagus, or sparagras) grows wild in Britain, although it is more common around the Mediterranean, but its cultivation in Britain only seems to have started sometime in the 16th century. During Charles II's reign, however, it was very popular, albeit with a rather short seasonal availability. For example the Garter Feast, held in St George's Hall at Windsor Castle for the Knights of the Garter on 15 April  1671, used 6,000 stalks of asparagus, alongside 16 barrels of oysters, 2,150 poultry, 1,500 crayfish and 22 gallons of strawberries. As well as Pepys' rabbits and pullet I expect asparagus featured somewhere on the coronation menu in 1661.

So here, from Robert May's 'The Accomplish't Cook' (1660), which was published immediately after Charles' return from exile, I simply offer this:

Buttered Sparagus.
Take two hundred of sparagus, scrape the roots clean and wash them, then take the heads of an hundred and lay them even, bind them hard up into a bundle, and so likewise of the other hundred; then have a large skillet of fair water, when it boils put them in, and boil them up quick with some salt; being boil'd drain them, and serve them with beaten butter and salt about the dish, or butter and vinegar.
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyTue 28 Apr 2020, 12:32

28 April 1794 - the so-called 'Sardinian Vespers', that is the popular revolt in Sardinia against Savoyard-Pietmontese rule.

With the Treaty of London (1718) at the conclusion of the War of the Spanish Succession, the Duchy of Savoy (Savoia) was granted control of the (previously Spanish) Kingdom of Sardinia, in exchange for the House of Savoy giving up its ancient hereditary claims on Sicily. Victor Amadeus II of Savoy, having now gained a king's crown in addition to his ducal coronet, promptly moved the kingdom of Sardina's capital to his own Piedmontese ducal capital of Turin. He then proceeded to rule his new kingdom from there, with the parliament and government of Sardinia being represented and governed exclusively by his own men from the mainland. The Sardinian population had no representation in their kingdom's parliament and they were even barred from holding any civil or military positions in their own region. By the late 18th century discontent against the Piedmontese administration was widespread and was further bolstered by the cries for independence that were developing in other European regions (namely Ireland, Poland, Belgium, Hungary, Tyrol) as well as the contemporary events in France that were rapidly leading towards the Revolution.

In 1793 France - having already annexed the adjacent island of Corsica just two decades earlier (1769) albeit not without a fight - attempted to conquer Sardinia. The locals however, and with little support from the mainland, managed to resist the invasion. While generally in accord with the French republican ethos, the Sardinian patriotic movement hoped that by this valliant feats of arms, their Savoyard overlords would simply acknowledge their cause and in return improve their conditions and grant them a significant degree of autonomy. However the King, a strict absolutist monarch, would have none of it. His peremptory refusal to grant the island any of these wishes quickly put paid to that idea and spurred the grumbling sense of grievence into open rebellion, with the arrest of two notable figures of the so-called "Patriotic Party" being the final spark of revolt amongst the populace.

On 28 April 1794, known as sa dii de s'aciappa ("the day of the pursuit and capture"), two senior Peidmontese officials were set upon and killed in the city of Cagliari, while others were hunted down and emprisoned. Many of these Piedmontese tried to adopt local clothing in order to blend into the crowd, so anyone suspected to be from the Italian mainland would be asked  to "say chickpea" (nara cixiri) in Sardinian: failure in pronouncing the word correctly would give their origin away. Encouraged by what happened in Cagliari, the people in Sassari and Alghero did the same and then the revolt spread throughout the rest of the island. In May all the captured Piedmontese officers and officials were expelled back to the mainland.

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 Ingresso-a-Sassari
The high point of the revolt: the entry of the Sardinian revolutionary leader Giovanni Maria Angioy into the city of Sassari in 1795.

However after two years of rebellion the uprising was eventually repressed by loyalist Piedmontese forces, bolstered by the 1796 peace treaty between France and Piedmont. Due to persecution by the ruling House of Savoy, Angloy, the rebellion's principal leader, fled from Sardinia and took refuge in republican France, where he lobbied for a French annexation of the island - but he died, still exiled in Paris, in 1808. Although local revolts continued, with major uprisings in Cagliari (1812) and Alghero (1821), Sardinia remained under Savoyard rule until 'The Perfect Fusion' (Italian: Fusione perfetta) in 1847. By this Act the Savoyard king, Charles Albert of Sardinia, finally abolished all the administrative differences between the mainland states (Savoy and Piedmont) and the island of Sardinia.

Today the date, 28 April 1794, is remembered as Sardinia Day (Sa die de sa Sardigna ) having been chosen in 1993 to commemorate the whole episode of Sardinia's fight for recognition as an equal partner with the rest of Italy.

Given the use of the word chickpea as a shibboleth to distinguish locals from outsiders during the revolt, it seems appropriate to mark the day with something made of chickpeas. Farinata ("made of flour") is a type of thin, unleavened pancake or crêpe made from chickpea flour which originated in Genoa (where it is called fainâ) and later became a typical food of the Ligurian sea coast, from Nice (where it's known as socca), to Tuscany (cecina "made of chickpeas") and Sardinia (where it goes by the name of fainè).

Chickpeas and flat-breads made from chickpea flour go back far into antiquity, although almost inevitably stories have arisen about the 'invention' of farinata. One story dates it from the time of the Punic Wars when Genoa (Genuva) was allied with Rome and claims it was created by Roman soldiers cooking their chickpea flour military rations on a flat shield placed on hot embers. Another tale says that following Battle of Meloria in 1284 (in which the Genoese fleet defeated that of the the rival city of Pisa, thereby assuming control of the Mediterranean) the Genoese galleys were hit by a storm and their stores of the dried legumes and olive oil became soaked in salt water and reduced to mush. Having nothing else to eat the crews were forced to eat the unappetising goo, which, flavored with salty sea water, turned out to be quite tasty, especially when left to dry in the sun to become kind of pancake. (although frankly I'm not sure what else they were intending to do with their dried chickpeas in the first place). Needless to say neither of these rather fanciful stores have much evidence to support them from before the late nineteenth century.

Anyway farinata is made by stirring chickpea flour into a mixture of water and olive oil to form a thin batter which is then poured into a metal pan to make a pancake typically about 4mm thick. This is then baked for a few minutes, traditionally in an open wood-fired oven. Farinata may be seasoned with fresh rosemary, pepper and sea salt. Traditionally the baked farinata is cut into irregularly shaped triangular slices, and eaten usually with no toppings and unadorned, but sometimes as an accompaniment to a few olives, slices of dried sausage, or small pieces of roasted sweet-pepper or pickled artichoke etc. Elsewhere in NW Italy, such as Tuscany, it might be served stuffed into small focaccia rolls (although I believe that's mainly just in Pisa) or put between two slices of bread, as it is traditional in Livorno (I think). But for all these slight regional variations, farinata typically remains a simple street food sold from bakeries or pizzerias, or served in bars as a uncomplicated, slightly salty appetizer, to accompany drinks.

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 Farinata-14       Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 Farinata-2
Farinata - simple and unadorned (L) or maybe with just a little rosemary and sea-salt (R).
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyWed 29 Apr 2020, 22:43

MM, what one learns here every day about history. As I am from the Low Countries, more focused on this history and the ones of France, Britain and a bit on the Holy Roman Empire not so aware that there was a history after "Rome" in italy. I have heard about the new Italy of 1870, Garibaldi, Mazzini and all that...but that from Sardinia is completely new to me...Thanks for this interesting story.

"Many of these Piedmontese tried to adopt local clothing in order to blend into the crowd, so anyone suspected to be from the Italian mainland would be asked  to "say chickpea" (nara cixiri) in Sardinian: failure in pronouncing the word correctly would give their origin away."
We have perhaps an equivalent in the history of the County of Flanders...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matins_of_Bruges
https://forvo.com/word/schild_en_vriend/
Yes it is the "sch" that the French as "sc" and also the "g" in "guild" that they pronounce as the English one in "good"
https://forvo.com/word/goed/#vls 
and here we say the same for "goed" as for "hoed" (hat) the same as in French as for "Hector": "Ektor"
That's quite difficult for "Ollanders"...

That said I learned also a lot about "chickpeas", where I had no idea what it was...after research it seemed to be our "kikkererwten" (frogs peas)
I and my partner have some bad experiences with that stuff. A "green lady" had convinced the partner to seek for these chickpeas as it was so healthy and so good for the digestion. Give me normal peas anytime...perhaps because we had cooked them as normal peas...
And now I see it is a basic food allover the world...and you can make flour of it?...

From my search of this evening if I all understood it well...you can make pizzas from normal Wink flour and also from chickpeas flour?

farinata as pizza...thin and foccaccia some 2 cm thick...?
https://www.11inchpizza.com.au/whats-the-difference-between-pizza-and-focaccia/

Kind regards, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyWed 29 Apr 2020, 23:28

@PaulRyckier wrote:
That said I learned also a lot about "chickpeas", where I had no idea what it was...after research it seemed to be our "kikkererwten" (frogs peas).

It would seem that the Dutch word, kikkererwten, like the English chickpea (from Middle English, chiche pease), is just modelled on the Middle French, pois chiche, (with the 'ch' pronounced more like in the English word 'church', rather than the soft 'sh' pronunciation of the modern French word, pois chiche), and where 'chiche' came originally from the Latin cicer. So all these names have nothing whatsoever do with chickens (or kippen), nor indeed frogs (kikken).

Incidentally the surname of the Roman orator, Marcus Tullius Cicero, was derived from cicer, ie chickpea. Plutarch said that the name was originally given to one of Cicero's ancestors who had a cleft in the tip of his nose resembling a chickpea, but it is more likely that Cicero's ancestors were simply involved in growing and selling chickpeas. Cicero's family was not alone in taking its name from a humble legume: the name Fabius is from fava bean (ie broad bean), Lentulus from lentil, and Piso from pea.

I can understand why you didn't appreciate chickpeas if they were cooked like ordinary garden peas because they usually need to be soaked and then boiled for a good half hour to get them soft enough to eat. But when properly cooked I think they are nice to eat just like that - or you can mash them up and mix with sesame, garlic and lemon juice to make hummus (again the word basically means 'chickpea' in Arabic) - or mix the chickpea flour with onion, garlic, herbs and spices, shape into small balls and then deep fry to make falafels. Miam miam.


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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyThu 30 Apr 2020, 08:08

Watch for the sun falling from the sky because I am about to make a post to do with cooking and food.....not a great strength of mine. Chickpeas are an important part of subcontinental fare. used in a potato salad with garam massala, onions coriander leaves and eiher tamarind ot yoghurt to make a great side dish - for the afternoon - as are dehi burra  - batter cakes soaked in yogurt with raw spices in a powder on top. The flour  for these- called gram, there, is also the basis for yummy pakoras - usually vegetable there but in UK chicken ones are more common. Best bought  in the subcontinent from bazaar street stalls and to hell with the probably backdoor trots likely to follow. Going off to have a pine for my other life.
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PaulRyckier
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyThu 30 Apr 2020, 23:24

MM, thank you very much for the immediate reply...the whole day busy to prepare for the French thread about the German "Sonderweg"...excuses...I will comment tomorrow...
Kind regards, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyFri 01 May 2020, 14:19

@Meles meles wrote:
I can understand why you didn't appreciate chickpeas if they were cooked like ordinary garden peas because they usually need to be soaked and then boiled for a good half hour to get them soft enough to eat. But when properly cooked I think they are nice to eat just like that - or you can mash them up and mix with sesame, garlic and lemon juice to make hummus (again the word basically means 'chickpea' in Arabic) - or mix the chickpea flour with onion, garlic, herbs and spices, shape into small balls and then deep fry to make falafels. Miam miam.

MM, you are an inexhaustible source of culinary knowledge...

As I have learned it now from you, we can give the chickpeas a go, as suggested by our "green believers" acquaintances. And I wasn't aware that chickpeasflour was a basic food allover the world. BTW: They say also "kekererwten", which is closer to the Latin "cicer" (spoken as we learned in the Fifties, as Kaesar as in the Dutch keizer and the German Kaiser)

And now I remember about "linzen" it seems to be "lentils" in English. And also a recommendation of some "green" friends.
And a vague rememberance of the nunschool, where we learned about the Bible and a Jacob? selled his brother's "eerstgeboorterecht" (never meet the word again since that time: it seems to be "birthright"...but that don't sounds right to me...hasn't it to be "primogeniture"?) in exchange for a dish of lentils soup.

That said: What is the difference between "lentils" and "chickpeas"? And can you do the same with them as with chickpeas?

Kind regards, Paul.
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Meles meles
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyFri 01 May 2020, 15:02

@PaulRyckier wrote:
They say also "kekererwten", which is closer to the Latin "cicer" (spoken as we learned in the Fifties, as Kaesar as in the Dutch keizer and the German Kaiser). Paul.

Yes .... Although certainly not an expert I am interested in language, and so as I undersand it, in French, the hard roman 'c', as is caesar or cicero, (ie pronounced like the 'k' in kaiser) changed over time. Thus the roman word for "song" canto(s), with a hard "k", became chantos ("ch" pronounced as in the English 'chant'), and eventually, "chante", that is with the modern French soft "sh" sound. But frankly that's just my take on it and I'm very far from being an expert on this.

@PaulRyckier wrote:
And a vague rememberance of the nunschool, where we learned about the Bible and a Jacob? selled his brother's "eerstgeboorterecht" (never meet the word again since that time: it seems to be "birthright"...but that don't sounds right to me...hasn't it to be "primogeniture"?) in exchange for a dish of lentils soup..

I'm certainly no Biblical scholar either,  but I thought the whole point about that particular fable was that, being twins, and so neither was really the "primogeniture", other than just by fate and so they were really equals - only they weren't. Although perhaps your "nunschool" put a different spin on the story. But whatever, foodwise, the King James Bible translates the said dish as a "mess of pottage" ... that is a serving (and by the word "mess" it implies it is to be shared: a mess at a medieval dinner was usually four people) of "pottage", which was the ubiquitous porridgey broth, perpetually on the go in every medieval household throughout Europe, ie it meant just the usual food from home.

@PaulRyckier wrote:
That said: What is the difference between "lentils" and "chickpeas"? And can you do the same with them as with chickpeas?

Same as with any dried legumes really: soak first and then boil until tender, although note that some - red kidney beans in particular - do very much need to be boiled, not just simmered, for at least ten minutes to destroy all the toxins. But, after boiling, just don't throw away the water you've just boiled your beans/lentils/chickpeas in ... because it's a brilliant vegan substitute for egg-white, albumin, whether to use in cakes, biscuits, or even meringues.


Last edited by Meles meles on Sat 02 May 2020, 02:11; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyFri 01 May 2020, 20:05

MM, 

I knew about the French Cicero. It was just that we after three years Latin with César and Cicero, we had in the fourth "Latin- Sciences" to say "kaisar" and "kikero" because the linguists had discovered that...And "kaisar" was for us not that unusual as in Germa, and Dutch..., but "kikero" in God's name...everybody tried to avoid to speak it out in class Wink...

David and Esau. Twins you said. I am not that well versed in the Bible. We Catholics from the nunschool...no bible... we had to believe what the nuns said, and the pastor and the pope...and to seek now for the Dutch protestant "Statenbijbel"...

Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 1024px-Hendrick_ter_Brugghen_-_The_Supper_-_WGA22170


Chickpeas and lentils...MM, you were and are such an irreplaceable acquisition for this board.

PS: and now in a hurry to my German Sonderweg...

Kind regards, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyWed 13 May 2020, 18:47

Just for you Paul - and bearing in mind that today (13 May) is apparently International Hummus Day, - here are some chickpea recipe suggestions from The Guardian newspaper: One tin of chickpeas – 17 delicious ways to use it, from halloumi salad to chocolate torte.
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PostSubject: Re: Dish of the Day - II   Dish of the Day - II - Page 7 EmptyWed 13 May 2020, 21:57

@Meles meles wrote:
Just for you Paul - and bearing in mind that today (13 May) is apparently International Hummus Day, - here are some chickpea recipe suggestions from The Guardian newspaper: One tin of chickpeas – 17 delicious ways to use it, from halloumi salad to chocolate torte.
 
Thank you so much MM. Paul.
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