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 The Tumbleweed Suite

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Triceratops
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 14 Mar 2018, 10:21

Stephen Hawking was at the BBC for an appearance on Newsnight.  Producer in room setting up for interview. Pulled out lead for light and Hawking slumped forward in chair like disconnected something vital. Producer runs for help, returns to room to find Hawking chuckling.

EDIT:
the actual story:

BBC Hawking


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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 14 Mar 2018, 14:14

This is how a Secret Service operates:

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PaulRyckier
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 14 Mar 2018, 20:05

@Temperance wrote:
Lord, LiR, you do sound sunk in cosmic gloom - nearly as bad as I was yesterday. Serious suggestion - have you thought of joining a local gym or Fitness Centre? Much better than tramping up and down the stairs on your own. Sometimes the NHS will cover/help towards fees if there is an underlying medical issue like osteoporosis. Most centres do gentle classes for the over50s and it's a good way of having fun - you don't have to use the weights at a gym if it's not your thing (it's not mine - I just like jumping about to music - really good for the old beta endorphin release).

Mind you, I remember one of the pictures nordmann posted on the Great Captions Challenge which reminded me of me attempting to do Pilates - I think I laughed for an hour after seeing it. I've had a quick look, but can't find it - it might cheer you up.

Take care and, like me yesterday, sing a few choruses of "Always Look On the Bright Side of Life" - usually works a treat.

Temperance, Temperance,

Pilates you said and gym halls...
The granddaugther tried it once, downloaded from the net, and after a while thought it was not for her...and now she does again the "normal" exercises...It lets me think at a "new belief" as the veggies and the bios...when I enter the bio for my wife to buy some broken linseed to add it to her 0% "platte kaas" (they translate it as: cottage cheese, white cheese, junket) I even think that the visitors have another physiognomy and other clothes. And if I say "bio" it is a great surface (grande surface) from a store chain, which of course only see money and entice customers by clever advertisement. They have even a whole department with food and vegetables, of course all bio all with a label. But what is a label worth, today we have again a food scandal in our little Belgium, a meat even selled in a quality shop chain.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilates
Effectiveness
In 2015 the Australian Government's Department of Health published a meta study which reviewed the existing literature on 17 alternative therapies including Pilates, in order to determine if any were suitable for being covered by health insurance. The review found that due to the small number and methodologically limited nature of the existing studies, the effectiveness of Pilates is uncertain.[6] For the treatment of lower back pain, low quality evidence suggests that while Pilates is better than doing nothing, it is no more effective than other forms of physical exercise.[16][4] There is some evidence regular sessions can help with the conditioning of the abdominal muscles of healthy people, when compared to doing no exercise.[7] There is no good evidence it helps improve balance in elderly people.[5]

And as I said I supposed a new belief/organisation:
Legal status
In October 2000 "Pilates" was ruled a generic term by a U.S. federal court, making it free for unrestricted use.[18]
As a result of the court ruling, the Pilates Method Alliance was formed as a professional association for the Pilates community. Its purpose was to provide an international organization to connect teachers, teacher trainers, studios, and facilities dedicated to preserving and enhancing the legacy of Joseph H. Pilates and his exercise method by establishing standards, encouraging unity, and promoting professionalism.[19]

But about the gym hall you are right, you are in a band of like minded  and perhaps more important "in society" and that is, I think, good for the mental health...but can't you have the same result in a "café" (pub, bar)?

And as I see it LiR's method is in my humble opinin a good one, as my method I described in a former message...quite alone and at our own tempo...no competition and boasting...and after that loneliness, we can go wherever we want to have our socializing moment...again in my humble opinion...

Kind regards from your friend Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 14 Mar 2018, 20:14

Lady,

"I've read your links Paul and I think I remember you having mentioned receiving incorrect medicine."

Yes that was it:
And about the interaction of the antibioticum Cyprofluoxin that I first took instead of Augmentin, with Advagraf/Tacrolimus
http://renalfellow.blogspot.be/2008/11/tacrolimus-drug-interactions.html
For me it was one week detoriating every day, until I had the meeting with the female doctor...the worst of my life...

Kind regards from Paul.
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Temperance
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 14 Mar 2018, 20:41

There is no "boasting or competition" in the classes (not just Pilates) that I go to, Paul: we just enjoy ourselves and have a good laugh. The benefits of moderate exercise are undisputed, not just to improve muscle tone and control weight, but also to help with low mood. But I agree that each individual must decide for himself or herself what works best. I was wrong to offer any suggestions: I am sorry if my post has been taken the wrong way.

Here again is the picture which reminded me of myself the first time I tried Pilates. It still makes me laugh. I wonder who the poor girl on the left was and if she got any better? Perhaps she indeed just thought, "Blow this for a game of soldiers!" and went to the pub. That has been known to happen.


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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 14 Mar 2018, 21:26

@Temperance wrote:
There is no "boasting or competition" in the classes (not just Pilates) that I go to, Paul: we just enjoy ourselves and have a good laugh. The benefits of moderate exercise are undisputed, not just to improve muscle tone and control weight, but also to relieve the symptoms of depression. But I agree that each individual must decide for himself or herself what works best. I was wrong to offer any suggestions: I am sorry if my post has been taken the wrong way. I was only trying to lighten the mood.

Here again is the picture which reminded me of myself the first time I tried Pilates. That's me on the left, just in case you were wondering. I've got a bit better now, but not much.





Dear Temperance,

I was just starting a new critique on a second subject of yours, the second time already this evening and I promised myself to apologize to you about both the critiques, as it was pure coincidence and as it was not directed explicitely to your person but more a rant of an old fashioned traditional classic person to some new things in society, and my wife says it also, there can be no more old fashioned one than I...
And you are right, if one feels well with whatever method, be it Pilates or something else, one has to do that because to do what one wants gives satisfaction.

To come back to my second comment, it is not really a critique, as I seen it on the internet Pontius Pilate is really the English term, but in our class as it was in Dutch language we learned Pontius Pilatus and they said it was his real name. And I see now that it is in German also Pontius Pilatus (as we say also for St. Paul: St Paulus) And I searched in French and there they made even "Ponce Pilate" of him.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pontius_Pilate


Limestone block discovered in 1961 with Pilate's tribute in Latin to Tiberius. The words [...]TIVS PILATVS[...] can be clearly seen on the second line.

Kind regards from your friend Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 15 Mar 2018, 09:55

I'm suffering from odd sock syndrome at present - I don't know what happens because my socks always start off as a pair - I sometimes manage to reunite the lost socks later.  I don't fancy going to the U3A Spanish class with one purple sock and one pink and black striped one - but fortunately I have some tights I can wear.
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Gilgamesh of Uruk
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 15 Mar 2018, 10:06

Yes, Paul - old Marcus' cognomen would, of course, have been Pilatus, the -us ending indicating his male gender, so his full "triple name" would normally have been written  "M Pontius Pilatus", the praenomina were so few in number they were habitually shortened to 1 or 2 letters - "C" for Caius (and for Gaius), "Ti" for Tiberius etc.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 15 Mar 2018, 10:15

Hawking could make that cart speed along:

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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 15 Mar 2018, 10:25

On a related note to the pronunciation of Pontius Pilate/Pilatus, I always wonder why classical names and titles ending in '-o', or, '-oh', like pharaoh or Cicero, are always changed to an '-on' ending when written in French? Marcus Tullius Cicero spelled his name like that in classical Latin, but in French he's always known as Cicéron; his secretary, Marcus Tullius Tiro, is similarly changed to Tiron; and the ancient Egyptian kings are all called pharaons in French. But more modern words don't generally pick up a final 'n' ... Tokyo and Milano are both spelled just like that in French. It's all the more bizarre because in French the 'n' of a word ending in '-on' isn't really pronounced anyway ... or only as the nasal equivalent of a gallic shrug: 'ng'.


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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 15 Mar 2018, 11:26

@Meles meles wrote:
On a related note to the pronunciation of Pontius Pilate/Pilatus, I always wonder why classical names and titles ending in -o, or, -oh, like pharaoh or Cicero, are always changed to an -on ending when written in French? Marcus Tullius Cicero spelled his name like that in classical Latin, but in French he's always known as Cicéron, his secretary, Marcus Tullius Tiro, is similarly changed to Tiron, and the the Egyptian kings are called pharaons in French. But more modern words don't gnerally pick up a final 'n' ... Tokyo is spelled just like that in French. It's all the more bizarre because in French the 'n' of a word ending in '-on' isn't really pronounced anyway.
Similarly in English, when referring to the sort of Latin we were taught, the term "Ciceronian" is used, as are cognate contructions like "pharaonic period" etc.
 On the topic of Latin pronunciation, I was one removed from the choir for a performance of (istr) "Fortuna Imperatrix Mundi" from Orff's "Carmina Burana" because I kept slipping back into "New Pronunciation" for words like "velut luna".
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 15 Mar 2018, 12:18

@Meles meles wrote:
On a related note to the pronunciation of Pontius Pilate/Pilatus, I always wonder why classical names and titles ending in '-o', or, '-oh', like pharaoh or Cicero, are always changed to an '-on' ending when written in French?

From learning about classical literature, philosophy and history - including Roman - through Classical Greek. The "n" bit after an "o" is pretty common throughout Europe for that reason, and the real question is how come in Britain the Latin prevailed?

In fact if you read Thomas More he was an "n" man too, even when writing in English, which suggests that maybe the adoption of a standard different to that which prevailed in what was perceived to be a "Catholic" education elsewhere might have been a later side-effect of having adopted a reformation which in reality wasn't much of a reform at all. More importance than was probably really merited therefore may have been placed on such inconsequential niceties in British universities post-protestantism (Tudor style). Countries which underwent a more fundamental reformation or which never reformed at all simply carried on as normal. The phrase "it's all Greek to me" may have arisen in Britain around the same time for the same reason - it's one that tends to baffle a lot of other Europeans when they first encounter it (and in Greece is perceived by many as something of an insult actually).
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 15 Mar 2018, 15:00

With all the goings on at the moment vis-à-vis Russia, Frankie Boyle's rake on Vladimir Putin, from 7 months ago:

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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 15 Mar 2018, 15:07

I can't really help with the Pontius Pilate pronunciation - did Chaucer refer to Cato as 'Catoun' (sp?) somewhere in 'The Canterbury Tales'?  On a much more prosaic note, today was my first attendance for some months at the U3A Spanish class (the teacher and his wife have been travelling though some of it (my absence, not the teacher's and his wife's holiday) was down to my indisposition with fatigue and then with the broken humerus) and I was very rusty (it didn't help that we were doing the subjunctive but some of my answers to the written homework were wrong).  Now I'm realising that if I'd perhaps watched some light videos in Spanish rather than watching the conspiracy theory ones I watched when I was rather out of circulation, well maybe I wouldn't have forgotten quite so much of my Spanish.


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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 15 Mar 2018, 15:31

Pluton, a French 74, at Trafalgar ( in the centre of the picture)

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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 15 Mar 2018, 21:36

@Gilgamesh of Uruk wrote:
Yes, Paul - old Marcus' cognomen would, of course, have been Pilatus, the -us ending indicating his male gender, so his full "triple name" would normally have been written  "M Pontius Pilatus", the praenomina were so few in number they were habitually shortened to 1 or 2 letters - "C" for Caius (and for Gaius), "Ti" for Tiberius etc.


Gil thanks for your information and yes the -us for the male gender...and I found for MM also something this evening about his French Cicéron. -oon ( oo is the Greek omega) is male and "o" is female.

Kind regardes from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 15 Mar 2018, 21:59

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
I can't really help with the Pontius Pilate pronunciation - did Chaucer refer to Cato as 'Catoun' (sp?) somewhere in 'The Canterbury Tales'?  On a much more prosaic note, today was my first attendance for some months at the U3A Spanish class (the teacher and his wife have been travelling though some of it was down to my indisposition with fatigue and then with the broken humerus) and I was very rusty (it didn't help that we were doing the subjunctive but some of my answers to the written homework were wrong).  Now I'm realising that if I'd perhaps watched some light videos in Spanish rather than watching the conspiracy theory ones I watched when I was rather out of circulation, well maybe I wouldn't have forgotten quite so much of my Spanish.

Lady, I searched for it and I think Cato was a real Latin name from the beginning I guess and couldn't have an equivalent in Greek. So it remains Cato. But for instance Cicero latin, Kikeroon (oo is omega) greek "oon" for the male, "o" for the female...I found in a list that I will show to MM.
 
Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 15 Mar 2018, 22:05

addendum to the previous.

Lady, it is not in the list that I will present to MM, but I found it here:
https://en.bab.la/dictionary/english-greek/cicero

 Kind regards, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 15 Mar 2018, 22:19

@Meles meles wrote:
On a related note to the pronunciation of Pontius Pilate/Pilatus, I always wonder why classical names and titles ending in '-o', or, '-oh', like pharaoh or Cicero, are always changed to an '-on' ending when written in French? Marcus Tullius Cicero spelled his name like that in classical Latin, but in French he's always known as Cicéron; his secretary, Marcus Tullius Tiro, is similarly changed to Tiron; and the ancient Egyptian kings are all called pharaons in French. But more modern words don't generally pick up a final 'n' ... Tokyo and Milano are both spelled just like that in French. It's all the more bizarre because in French the 'n' of a word ending in '-on' isn't really pronounced anyway ... or only as the nasal equivalent of a gallic shrug: 'ng'.

 Meles meles,

I think I found a list as I see it in Greek: -OON (oo is omega) for males and "o" for females. It seems the French follow the original Greek. But hen they spell the "c" as Latin" and not as the Greek "k", but the male Greek "oon" as "on"...
https://www.behindthename.com/names/usage/ancient-greek

female latin Dido-greek Dido
male latin Philo-greek Philoon
male Plato -platoon
female Sapho greek Sapho
male Xenon- greek Xenoon
And as said from my link to LiR:
Cicero-Kikeroon
And I think it was to that that nodmann was referring too?
For pharaoh or pharao as we write it in Dutch it seems to be more complicated Champolion?
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histoire_du_mot_pharaon

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 16 Mar 2018, 16:48

Enough, enough of this sort of yatter here It's a drinking place - and where Per can tell jokes and we relax - o think that Temp's attempt at pilates - what a display, Temps, has let to all this poderous Pontius stuff. Unless of course you are all drunk.

I need a small of something strong to lift with my left arm - it had better be red, in those circs. I know, cassis - is it drunk thus or does it have to be mixed with something? I have poured it liberally over ice cream desserts and the children got very silly. Not sure what else to do with it.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 16 Mar 2018, 16:54

Gee thanks, Priscilla, it's nice to know where one ranks, apparently I'm good for telling jokes - and what else?

Had I had a miff, I might have flown away.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 16 Mar 2018, 17:15

Miffs don't fly, Nielsen, we established that a long time ago.

What you want is a huff - they have been known to propel their bearer "off" in a "storm", which at least introduces the anemolian potential to be airborne too.

Personally though I recommend a high horse or an even higher dudgeon, and let it do all the work for one.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 16 Mar 2018, 21:02

A high dudgeon.?....... we had one of those but the wheel came off....... my father's stock remark about anything or word he did not understand.

And still I am uncertain how  imbibe  cassis; and I'm sure we can find a good reason for you to be here, Per.....finding your coat in a hurry, comes to mind........ and what the hell is anemolian potential? Pleased on't introduce it into the bar, nord. There's a nice new diary thread for that.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 17 Mar 2018, 20:57

Well done Ireland on a convincing win today, a splendid Triple Crown and a thoroughly deserved Grand Slam title in the Six Nations' Championship.

Cheers
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 24 Mar 2018, 19:05

I received today an e-mail that there is a new message on the tumbleweed, but I don't see anyone. Just the last from Vizzer.

Kind regards, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 25 Mar 2018, 22:14

@Meles meles wrote:
more modern words don't generally pick up a final 'n' ... Tokyo and Milano are both spelled just like that in French. It's all the more bizarre because in French the 'n' of a word ending in '-on' isn't really pronounced anyway ... or only as the nasal equivalent of a gallic shrug: 'ng'.

That must be a very modern switch with regard to Milan because I'm pretty sure that the English-language names and spellings of Milan and Turin come directly from the French. For some reason Genoa got missed out. This is particularly odd considering it's a port city with a maritime heritage. Maybe the English were expecting something like 'Genon' but when the French came up with Gênes (pronounced zhenn) it was thought that they weren't playing fair so the English chose their own version of the Italian original (Genova) instead. Was 'Genes' (pronounced jeans) or something similar ever used in English for the Ligurian capital?
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PostSubject: Edit to change 'earthed' to earther'. I'm 99% sure I typed the right word the first time - but the correction facility on my laptop changed it - shows how important it is not to rush the preview stage of entering a post.   Mon 26 Mar 2018, 11:28

@Nielsen wrote:
Gee thanks, Priscilla, it's nice to know where one ranks, apparently I'm good for telling jokes - and what else?

Had I had a miff, I might have flown away.
Oh don't belittle the ability to tell a good joke Nielsen, I've had dictations to type where people interrupt their business dictation with making (what they think are) "funny" asides (but which in reality are more funny peculiar than funny ha-ha) and I find myself cringing.  So if you can tell a joke successfully relish that aptitude.

Now not relating specifically to Nielsen I was thinking last night about a podcast I'd heard relating to someone who was making a homebuilt rocket with the aim of proving that the earth was flat.  Apparently there is one school of thought that he doesn't actually think the earth is flat but was using as a ruse to get some flat-earthers to donate towards the manufacture of the rocket.  Now I'm not sure if this is the same individual because the podcast mentions Nevada and I think the news item I've cited mentions California but it was a bit of a coincidence.  I was surprised to wake up today to hear of a flat-earther/rocket builder coming straight back down to earth.

https://www.independent.co.uk › News › World › Americas
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 26 Mar 2018, 16:40

LiR,

Thank you, I'd better post what was sent to me today - not intending to hurt any feelings, though.

"Someone just called me Normal,
I've never been so insulted in my entire life!"
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 30 Mar 2018, 18:03

'Tis quiet here today - maybe people are travelling for a holiday over the Paschal break.

Seeing Nielsen's post from Tuesday, is Danish humour like British humour?  I suppose it is tempting for each of us to think that we are special as an individual (as we are in some ways) and it's all the others who are bog standard.  I had a bit of a walk this afternoon (walking is supposed to be good for osteoporosis (I keep nearly typing osteoarthritis - which I don't have as far as I know though I am prone to rheumatoid arthritis though I don't have the full-blown variety [better not tempt Providence]).

I've realised about 3 months too late that instead of watching nutty videos when my movements were curtailed by first the coeliac disease (really it was because of the weakness and fatigue that the coeliac disease had caused) and then by the broken arm I could have read some of the online versions of myths that were linked a few years ago in the myths thread.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 01 Apr 2018, 11:13

I don't know if anybody will log in today (apart from Sincerely Thine) but happy Paschal feast if anyone does (calling it Easter seems a bit pagan to me).  But then most people here are not religious anyhow so maybe I should just say happy spring break.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 01 Apr 2018, 12:54

Hello LiR

and Happy Easter! 

Being heathen myself I have no problem with the word. The family (girl, boy and girl's fiancé) will be coming over for lunch shortly so I'm typing this between myriad jobs Mrs V has rostered for me. Just to add that the Met Office has been blowing hot and cold over the last fortnite regarding the forecast for snow across the British Isles this weekend. First it was on then it was off, then 24 hours ago it was suddenly on again and now off again.

For anyone who was expecting (or hoping for) a White Easter (not me) then here's a song about Easter Snow:



At least I don't have to shovel the front step now. So that's one less job to do. Vacuuming done. Next I have to peel spuds for roasting.

Catch ya later!
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 01 Apr 2018, 13:45

Happy Easter, LiR. It is unfortunate (and a tad embarrassing) that it falls on April Fools' Day today - haven't the heathen and godless hordes around here been forbearing in not mentioning it? See - they're not really that bad.  Smile  

I had a text message today telling me I'd be happier as a Pagan to which I have replied that, living in the depths of Devon as I do, I already am one - I learnt that at Res His.

The term pagan is derived from Late Latin paganus, revived during the Renaissance. Itself deriving from classical Latin pagus which originally meant 'region delimited by markers', paganus had also come to mean 'of or relating to the countryside', 'country dweller', 'villager'; by extension, 'rustic', 'unlearned', 'yokel', 'bumpkin'...

Apparently you can be a Roman Polytheistic Reconstructionist these days - the mind boggles.

I wish I could eat roast lamb, but I won't. It is so nice with mint sauce though - and new potatoes. Cauliflower cheese and healthy, nutty things just aren't the same somehow: one is sometimes tempted to turn, if not quite heathen, then at least carnivore for the day...
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 01 Apr 2018, 16:10

It's the smell of bacon that still tempts me, Temperance but I have forborne.  There is that fake meat (Quorn) though.  Well, you learn something everyday, so that is the etymology of 'pagan'.  I'm sure I've mentioned before that there is a magic shop in my hometown.  I have withstood any temptation to enter therein much as I would love to be able to cast a spell and get my housework done quickly.

If you look at this thread again today, Temperance, or maybe when you eventually do, if that happens on another day, referring to the various hoaxes mentioned on the Museum of Hoaxes website that I mentioned on the Fakers thread, could you confirm whether or not the shine in the dark strips of paint were ever painted on Dartmoor ponies or was it just an idea that was toyed with.  (As you live in that neck of the woods even if not on Dartmoor itself).
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 01 Apr 2018, 20:16

@Temperance wrote:
I wish I could eat roast lamb, but I won't. It is so nice with mint sauce though - and new potatoes. Cauliflower cheese and healthy, nutty things just aren't the same somehow: one is sometimes tempted to turn, if not quite heathen, then at least carnivore for the day...

I wish I could afford roast lamb ... but it's so expensive these days, whether it's from New Zealand, Wales or the local stuff. But Temp, I thought, during your trials with the new microwave a couple of weeks ago, that you'd successfully roasted a chicken ... or was it a 'micken' - mock chicken? Anyway I'm just pleased that everyone has gone off to the village restaurant and so I haven't had to cook.

By the way Temp I thought of you today and your horror of stinky cheese. Two guys from Spain who were staying this weekend had spent yesterday at the local market buying a load of local foody specialities, and the cheeses and charcuterie they'd put overnight in the guest fridge. They left this morning but when I checked the fridge later, although completely empty, it still really stank of cheese ... so pungent that Doggy-Dog outside in the garden picked up on it and came trotting in hoping for some cheesey delights.

And I heard my first cuckoo of the year this morning.

Happy Easter one and all.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 02 Apr 2018, 10:25

I eat poultry and fish, MM. I won't touch red meat - for all sorts of reasons, some dietary, some because of environmental/animal concerns. I only eat Happy British Chickens that have been allowed to lead a reasonable life (for a chicken) - scratting about and eating juicy worms, birds which are then dispatched speedily and humanely. I hope I am not fooling myself about all this - cognitive dissonance and all that. I'm good at cognitive dissonance.

Apparently there are all sorts of words for semi-vegetarians:


Vegetarianism is the practice of abstaining from consuming meat. Along with the term flexitarian, which was listed in the mainstream Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary in 2012, other neologisms for semi-vegetarianism are reducetarianism and lessetarianism.

Common reasons for adopting a semi-vegetarian diet may be ethical issues relating to animal welfare (including health) or animal rights, the environment (see environmental vegetarianism) or reducing resource use (see economic vegetarianism), which are also arguments in favor of adopting a fully vegetarian diet. While semi-vegetarians may view the meat or animal products as occasional indulgences, staunch vegetarians may resent the term or view it as cheating or as a moral lapse. In contrast, many proponents of veganism embrace semi-vegetarianism as a way to get a broader section of the general public to act on arguments for veganism, with the consequence that more animal suffering and environmental devastation will be prevented than if the public views meat-reduction as all-or-nothing.

A ranking by U.S. News & World Report, involving a panel of experts, evaluated 32 popular diets based on several variables including health, weight loss, and ease of following. In the 2014 list, the semi-vegetarian diet came in sixth place, ahead of both the vegan and vegetarian diets. Specific semi-vegetarian diets include:

Pollotarian: someone who eats chicken or other poultry, but not meat from mammals, often for environmental, health or food justice reasons.
Pescetarian: someone who eats fish or other seafood, but not poultry or meat from mammals.
Pollo-pescetarian: someone who eats both poultry and fish/seafood, though no meat from mammals.



Crikey - people do make life complicated.

Quote :


...staunch vegetarians may resent the term or view it as cheating or as a moral lapse.

You can say that again. Staunch vegetarians are like fundamentalist fanatics - and vegans are the martyrs of the veggie religion. I'm regarded as a dead loss by both the religious and the dietary militants  - not willing to fight to the death over things, you see. I might have a lamb chop tomorrow.





Last edited by Temperance on Mon 02 Apr 2018, 12:47; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 02 Apr 2018, 12:13

I didn't mean to out you as a closet meat-eater, it was just something you once said when we were talking about anaemia. And anyway you might have just been trying out the new oven by cooking for someone else ... I often cook things that I don't intend to eat myself.  Like you I occasionally eat happy farm-reared poultry (I'm possibly deluding myself as well although I do know the occasional duck or guinea fowl I get comes from a small flock raised in a nearby small-holding); some game (rabbit, boar and venison) that I get given by local hunters; fish, eggs (from the same small-holding) and cheese. I very rarely eat lamb/mutton due to the exorbitant cost, and don't usually eat pork (due to welfare concerns), though as a parsimonious nose-to-tail diner I'll eat lamb and pig offal; and I've hardly eaten any beef for many, many years. I'm certainly not a vegetarian but rather an omnivore that eats lots of vegetables (often from my own garden) and very little meat, and what meat I do eat I'm prepared to pay a bit more to get local, free-range or wild, and that has had a reasonably natural existence until the very last minute.

But for today, as it's Easter and have been working my butt off this weekend, I've got a piece of wild boar filet mignon. That will be the first bit of actual meat I'll have had for nearly a week. This relative austerity of course has nothing to do with Lent but rather the fact that it's just at the beginning of the bookings season and so my bank account is empty, while there's also not much growing yet in the garden. Accordingly these last few weeks I've been mostly surviving on dried beans and lentils, last year's frozen veg stocks, turnip tops and mâche eked out with nettles and dandelions. So I will thoroughly enjoy tonight's pig, served with home-grown (last years') broad beans and carrots, and a creamy sauce of morille mushrooms (picked last year in the woods). Yum.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 02 Apr 2018, 12:46

Sounds pretty good to me: I bet you are the healthiest of the lot of us.

MM wrote:
I didn't mean to out you as a closet meat-eater, it was just something you once said when we were talking about anaemia.


Yes - I was Vitamin B12 deficient, having eschewed red meat since about 1972. I then found myself in the ridiculous position of having to chew three revolting dessicated liver tablets a day - either that or have injections in my bottom.

Moderation is a wiser policy than zealotry - in diet as in all things. Or, a little bit of what you fancy does you a heck of a lot of good - as Aristotle, or Aelius Galenus or Emerson, or some other dead brainy bloke once said. Occasionally a lot of what you fancy does you good, too.

“Let us eat and drink neither forgetting death unduly nor remembering it. The Lord hath mercy on whom he will have mercy, etc. etc. etc., and the less we think about it the better.”
― Samuel Butler
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 02 Apr 2018, 13:11

@Temperance wrote:
Sounds pretty good to me: I bet you are the healthiest of the lot of us.

I wish ... the doctor says I have a fatty liver and high uric acid in my blood, and so to go easy with the booze. I've also got slightly high blood pressure, which is a bit of a mystery as I don't salt my food or even use salt when cooking, drink no coffee and have only two cups of tea a day, I do not have a sedentary job and am not overweight. But apparently it's just because I'm getting old ... which was almost as depressing to hear as being told to cut down on the wine.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 02 Apr 2018, 14:59

Oh crumbs, I hope I'm not like a fundamentalist, being vegetarian.

For some reason the above dialogue made me think of the music hall song "And Another Little Drink Wouldn't do us any harm"  

▶ 2:49

and herewith a link to the lyrics as the video is not that clear 




lyricsplayground.com/alpha/songs/a/anotherlittledrinkwouldntdousanyharm.html


Apparently it was featured in the "Wonder Woman" film (which I enjoyed in a lowbrow way) though I don't remember the song being sung in that film.


As for me I'm doing a bit of sewing (very boring - socks) but I seem to be adept at acquiring odd socks.  But since I had firstly the fatigue after the coeliac disease and then the convalescing after the humerus  break I have become somewhat lazy and I'm trying to get myself doing things again by doing small activities. 
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 02 Apr 2018, 20:48

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
Oh crumbs, I hope I'm not like a fundamentalist, being vegetarian.

For some reason the above dialogue made me think of the music hall song "And Another Little Drink Wouldn't do us any harm"  

▶ 2:49

and herewith a link to the lyrics as the video is not that clear 




lyricsplayground.com/alpha/songs/a/anotherlittledrinkwouldntdousanyharm.html


Apparently it was featured in the "Wonder Woman" film (which I enjoyed in a lowbrow way) though I don't remember the song being sung in that film.


As for me I'm doing a bit of sewing (very boring - socks) but I seem to be adept at acquiring odd socks.  But since I had firstly the fatigue after the coeliac disease and then the convalescing after the humerus  break I have become somewhat lazy and I'm trying to get myself doing things again by doing small activities. 

Lady, may I help you with another youtube:




http://lyricsplayground.com/alpha/songs/a/anotherlittledrinkwouldntdousanyharm.html

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 04 Apr 2018, 13:28

Rats!  I've finished the socks though they ended up too small!  Never mind, I'll use them as indoor gloves well mittens (having made a thumbhole and a gap at the top to cover to just under the fingertips)  though depending on the temperature I don't always need gloves when I type now.  I made them the lazy way  - really one should make a pattern piece for under the foot and one for the front of the foot, front let and one for the back of the foot and back of the leg.  I have used the quick and dirty way successfully in the past but it didn't work this time - the pieces probably needed to be bigger.


Thanks to Paul for the YouTube about the drinking song.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 05 Apr 2018, 16:14

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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 05 Apr 2018, 23:06

@Triceratops wrote:
IT BEGINS


Zombie Raccoons


Triceratops,

it becomes a plague overhere too, especially in Wallonia, the South of Belgium with the forests...
https://www.demorgen.be/wetenschap/wasbeer-trekt-verwoestend-spoor-door-belgische-bossen-b0593150/
According to scientists from hundreds till thousands in Belgium.
They come from populations in Germany.
They were originally from North-America, but imported in Germany on order of Rudolf Hess just before WWII with hunting purposes.
Already more than one million in Germany.
And even hunting is not a solution, while it can't halt the population growth...

I hope at least, these raccoons, you didn't let on your island...it seems that Australia has the same drastic reglements on food, vegetals and animals as the UK...?

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 09 Apr 2018, 09:58

To think of something else ...

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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 13 Apr 2018, 12:11

Round and about the City Centre:


Nuart Aberdeen 2018
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 14 Apr 2018, 12:07

Is that supposed to be a raccoon (the Aberdeen sculpture), Trike?  I thought you were perhaps going to show pictures of raccoons who had escaped in Aberdeen.  Still, today as I awoke to news of air strikes on chemical plants in Syria I could do with cheering up and you usually manage to find something whimsical, funny or unusual which can bring a smile to my features.  I've heard of mink escaping and being very injurious to trout.  There was many years ago a mink farm at the north end of my hometown but people protested and had it shut down because it was so stinky.  There was also going back maybe 20 years something in the local paper about a female raccoon (in captivity so presumably she had a mate) giving birth at 14 and apparently that's quite old for a female raccoon to have little raccoons.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 18 Apr 2018, 09:30

Right. Forget the war in Syria, Brexit, attempted assassinations in Salisbury, Facebook scandals and Trump corruption … this is really important. What have I done with my sourdough bread culture? It lives in a big kilner jar in the fridge, until, as I did at the weekend, I get it out to warm up and reactivate in preparation for making some bread. It likes to sit somewhere warm like on a radiator, but the central-heating hasn’t been on for several weeks now, so I’d have put it somewhere else, but where? It’s not on any sunny window-sills, nor on top of the hot water tank in the cellar, nor on top of the fridge, nor anywhere I can see in the south-facing downstairs rooms. It’s been three days now so it’ll have woken up and now will be starting to get hungry and be wanting some more wholemeal flour to be stirred in: like a sort of Tamagochi, it needs to be fed regularly or it’ll die and go off. But I can’t remember where I’ve put the jar. It’s probably sitting in plain view, or maybe just hidden by a washing basket or casually discarded shirt, but I’ve been searching since yesterday and now am just going round and round looking in all the same places. Help!
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 18 Apr 2018, 09:37

You wouldn't have put it back in the fridge?

At least that's what I might have done.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 18 Apr 2018, 09:48

No looked there ... my fear is that I had it in my hand when I got distracted by something else: the dog, the phone, etc, and just put it down ... so it could be anywhere. It's quite lively, in a yeasty sort of way, at least when it's warm, but even so I don't think it can move on its own .. it's called Brian by the way. Rolling Eyes
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 18 Apr 2018, 09:54

Back in the day I used sourdough as well, my mother used it for making rye bread - which is somewhat of a staple in this neck o' the woods - as she grew elderly I took up that, and made ir for her and me in her last couple of years.

Btw. we never named ours, it wouldn't have reacted anyway.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 18 Apr 2018, 10:23

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
Is that supposed to be a raccoon (the Aberdeen sculpture), Trike?  I thought you were perhaps going to show pictures of raccoons who had escaped in Aberdeen.  

LiR, I think its' supposed to be some sort of deer. Definitely no raccoons, escaped or zombified, in Aberdeen.


Meles' sourdough:

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