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 The Tumbleweed Suite

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Triceratops
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 18 Apr 2018, 10:23

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
Is that supposed to be a raccoon (the Aberdeen sculpture), Trike?  I thought you were perhaps going to show pictures of raccoons who had escaped in Aberdeen.  

LiR, I think its' supposed to be some sort of deer. Definitely no raccoons, escaped or zombified, in Aberdeen.


Meles' sourdough:

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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 18 Apr 2018, 10:28

I thought this was something that only happened in films;


Woman sucked out off plane





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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 18 Apr 2018, 10:45

@Triceratops wrote:


It's Alive!



Actually Trike, it might be more like this, especially if I've left it somewhere hot or in full sun:

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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 18 Apr 2018, 20:28

@Meles meles wrote:
No looked there ... my fear is that I had it in my hand when I got distracted by something else: the dog, the phone, etc, and just put it down ... so it could be anywhere. It's quite lively, in a yeasty sort of way, at least when it's warm, but even so I don't think it can move on its own .. it's called Brian by the way. Rolling Eyes


MM, nearly each day I have the same and it is already from the childhood, because I am so easely distracted. When I remember it after a while, then I go the ways back where I was in the last quarter and normally find it. But when it is a whole time, or my wife, who lost it, it can be that I scrutinize the whole house, inch for inch, and normally during an hour or more, gradually more and more excited, at the end I find it, even if her wanted booklet is mixed up in the waste paper and landed in the waste bin...

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 18 Apr 2018, 21:30

You’ll all be pleased to know - if only in a fairly ambivalent, n’importe quoi, sort of way - that I’ve found Brian.

I was mowing the lawn this afternoon and cogitating on my yeasty problem, when it came to me that, since the radiators were no longer on, I had probably put the pot somewhere that still got some heat from something that was still running most of the time … such as, perhaps, directly behind the PC. I stopped my mowing and rushed inside, fully expecting Brian to be lurking behind the same PC from which I’d been typing this morning’s plea. But alas, he wasn’t there either.

But then, I then recalled that when I’d finally shut down the PC that night, I’d moved the pot to where it would get some sun and warmth come the next day. I had already thoroughly searched the sunny south-facing rooms … but what if I’d then moved it during the day, perhaps along with all my trays of young tomato/courgette seedlings? And so there it was, in the place that gets the very last rays of the evening sun: on the top of the  woodpile, outside the kitchen door, on the west side of the house, and of course exactly where the cats take their evening nap.

And you’ll be pleased to know that Brian seems to be completely unaffected by his sojourn à l’exterieur,


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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 18 Apr 2018, 21:51

Yes, yes, Meles meles, reiterating the logic of your thoughts...

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 18 Apr 2018, 23:13

We have a theory that things you have lost are usually where they are supposed to be, though that wasn't the case with Brian obviously.  Or else we retrace our steps to where we last were, as Paul said, and that often jogs our memories.  Especially if I have just left one room to get something and by the time I get to the next have forgotten what it was I was looking for!  

I am a bit surprised your sourdough was unaffected by three nights outside, though, MM.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 19 Apr 2018, 08:30

@Caro wrote:

I am a bit surprised your sourdough was unaffected by three nights outside, though, MM.

Well we'll see, the proof of the bread will of course be in the baking, but it smelled OK and was clearly still alive and generating CO2 ... the last few nights have been very mild with temperatures no lower than 12°C, which has been good for my tomato plants too.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 20 Apr 2018, 11:42

The Blob is now back under control, I see.

.....................................................................................

Somebody really should have said something to this bod:



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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 20 Apr 2018, 20:03

@Triceratops wrote:

Somebody really should have said something to this bod:



Triceratops,

you have a bit the "allure" (oops and I see now that that French word seems to exist in English too) of Gilgamesh, at least to me. Pushing me to guess where his humour lays now this very time.

First I had to seek for "bod" in my paperback Collins, and there they say: fellow, chap...in my early days on the BBC 2002 I learned the word "bloke"...is that old-fashioned now?...

Now to the picture...

is the word "shyte" the clue? And of course I, with others here in Belgium, Holland? (I ask Dirk), but also the Germans have something with jokes about the human solid excrements... Embarassed  and of course I see the word "shit"...perhaps in any constellation that you will show, its a bit like at the psy...what do you see in this picture...a nude woman...and in this one...a nude women...and in this one...

And in the same vein I see of course our word from overhere (West Flanders) "schitchocola"com, in Dutch: "schijtchocolade" (shitchocolate.com)...and I can't resist to say that it seems both to be brown Embarassed ...of course you have white chocolate too...

If that was not the right interpretation, Triceratops, I had nevertheless the joy of composing my message...

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 21 Apr 2018, 23:28

Just to say to Caro, ID, LiR, MM, Per, nordmann, Triceratops, Vizzer that if I don't post next week, it is because of holydays for a week to the neighbour, The Netherlands, the Northern part of the Low Countries, the former "Leo Belgicus"

Kind regards to all and see you end next week again.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 23 Apr 2018, 12:27

The Royal Baby is on its way!

The Daily Mail has this rather unfortunate headline online - for one dreadful moment I thought it was going to be a Public Labour - as in the olden days.


Kate Middleton in labour LIVE: Duchess of Cambridge in early stages at Lindo Wing


If it's a boy, the bookies' favourite name is Arthur. I do hope not - given the unhappy Tudor associations. Shame George is already George - it is 23rd April today! I suppose if the new arrival were a celebrity's baby he could be called Dragon.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 23 Apr 2018, 15:15

It's a boy:


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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 23 Apr 2018, 16:41

I read a historical whodunnit recently which I actually quite enjoyed but there is a description (the story being set in 1348) of a middle eastern meal (or course of a meal) consisting of a mixture of chicken and turkey.  Chickens I know existed in the Old World in medieval times but I thought turkeys (as in the birds) came from the Americas. Was that an "oops" moment?  Otherwise I liked the story.  It wasn't frightfully frightfully highbrow but I like something lighter at times.


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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 23 Apr 2018, 20:49

I think that was indeed an "oops" moment, although it's probably not a terribly serious faux pas.

Turkeys - which were called that because they and other exotic things mostly arrived in Britain via the 'Levant and Turkey Merchant Company', who typically stopped en route from the Middle East to London at Seville and Lisbon - were, as you say, originally from the Americas and arrived in Europe, courtesy of Spanish discoveries and conquests, only after 1494. But the guinea fowl is a closely related species that is originally from West Africa, and there is a lot of evidence to suggest they were well known to the Romans, and even farmed in Italy, during the first few centuries AD. But with the collapse of the western Roman Empire guinea fowl seem to have again become unknown in Europe, until they were rediscovered in their West African heartland by the Portuguese, sometime towards the end of the 15th century. But they only seem to have found their way to England, via the Levant and Turkey Merchants again, in about the 1520s. This is almost exactly the same time as true turkeys first arrived in England from what would become Mexico, and so there is often confusion over whether Tudor texts are talking about turkeys or guinea fowl. However from memory both birds are mentioned, and clearly distinguished from each other, in the sumptuary laws of Thomas Cranmer, which were written in the mid 1540s, and in which turkeys are equated, for culinary purposes, with big birds like geese, peacocks, bustards and swans, whereas the much smaller guinea fowl are ranked alongside barnyard fowls like chickens and ducks.

I like historical whodunnits ... what was the book?
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 24 Apr 2018, 08:46

The book was "The Deadliest Sin" by the Medieval Murderers - it's a collection of stories contributed to by Michael Jecks, Susannah (sp? not P) Gregory, Bernard Knight and others.  It is written from a perspective where most of the characters believe in a supernatural world though.  I have no idea what the writers believe.  They may not believe in such matters but just be getting inside their characters' heads.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 27 Apr 2018, 04:31

I've been working through the night to try and tidy the house a bit before the man from the electricity comes to put in a smart meter tomorrow (well later today now).  I'm still not really "there" but I think I'd better try and have a bit of sleep, or a rest at least, even if it's short.  However, when I was sifting through stuff in one of the upstairs rooms I came across a stamp I'd taken off an envelope some time ago.  Somebody I know collects used stamps for charity (or passes them on to a friend of his more exactly) but I came across a stamp featuring "The Four Marys" from "The Bunty" comic. I must have taken the stamp off the envelope in order to give to that person.  Bunty was mentioned on this site not too long ago.  nordmann mentioned the Bunty figure that was printed on the back of the comic at one stage in her vest and pants - a bit of a passion killer I would have thought - the idea was that one had an outfit to clad Bunty in each week.  At the time I was reading "Bunty" I had no idea the title "The Four Marys" mirrored a folk song; it wasn't until I was about 16 I heard Joan Baez singing about Mary Hamilton and "Last night the queen had four Marys, tonight she'll have but three" (I'm not going to try and do a Scots accent even if I'm just typing).


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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 27 Apr 2018, 12:08

To Dirk - I've deleted the topics as requested by you.

As said in my PM, and it's worth everyone bearing in mind, sites like this get trawled by bots looking for possible copyright infringements, and large chunks of copied text without due accreditation are a particular trigger for their operators to then start making threatening noises. Since I let the legal team go a while back (they were costing me a fortune in blotters) I don't wish to end up in the US Supreme Court or sitting next to the Facebook eejit at a senate hearing. Too old for all that stuff ...
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 27 Apr 2018, 12:25

@Triceratops wrote:
It's a boy:



And his name is:

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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 27 Apr 2018, 12:40

Anyone getting up reasonably early at the weekend ( in the UK at any rate) can switch on Freeview Channel 81 and watch:




anyone else remember it?
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 28 Apr 2018, 21:41

@Triceratops wrote:
Anyone getting up reasonably early at the weekend ( in the UK at any rate) can switch on Freeview Channel 81 and watch:




anyone else remember it?

Triceratops,

you gave a lot of work to distill what you were talking about...
Of course I first thought at the film that we have seen also overhere in Belgium:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2XeERAFuoMI

But here it is:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawkeye_and_the_Last_of_the_Mohicans
From the wiki:
Loosely based on the 1826 novel The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper, the series was released under several different names, including Hawkeye and The Last of the Mohicans.
The series was set in New York's Hudson Valley in the 1750s but was filmed in Canada.[1] The end credits state that the series was filmed in Canada with the cooperation of The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
The series had a more realistic view of America than most series of the times. The settlers were rough and dressed in old but suitable clothes for the long hard winters in the small settlements of the new frontier. The Native Americans were more realistically portrayed too, as an intelligent people with good and bad individuals among them. Fights in the film needed more than just the odd blow as the opponents hit hard at each other, and torture was used in a number of episodes. Weapons used were normally single shot rifles and tomahawks (which often ended up in someone's back). Furs were often a motive of crime as they were the currency of the northern settlements.

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 30 Apr 2018, 18:24

My cat has earned her keep this afternoon (while I've been out) and caught a mouse.  Of course, she could have caught it outside and brought it in.  I was a bit suspicious a while ago and put some bait in a place the cat can't get - I don't want to harm the cat.  This mouse was not anywhere near the bait though.

With regard to The Last of the Mohicans I saw the version with Daniel Day-Lewis on TV some years ago. I don't know how accurate Mr Day-Lewis' (Lewis's?) American accent was.  I think he's married to Arthur Miller's daughter so I suppose he gets plenty of chances to practise his American accent.  I only notice the dodgy British accents sometimes affected by non-British actors (though to be fair some non-British people have managed to pull off convincing British accents - the lady who played the title role in Borgen comes to mind).
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 07 May 2018, 21:44

Tuesday is usually the day where I spend an hour and a half at a French conversation group.  I have (I may have mentioned this before?) been carrying something about the medieval French noblewoman turned pirate, Jeanne de Clisson, since before Xmas.  Of course I did miss a number of classes while my arm was mending. Anyway, I was looking for something that might be a bit shorter and as I was sidetracked by conspiracy theories while I was ill/convalescing I looked for something in French.  There is a site (which I can't find now) that had something about dolphins being part of the illuminati because of the triangle thing that sticks up on their backs (in some species anyway).  I did wonder did someone make that up.  But I learned that one translation of conspiracy theory in French is "thèse complot" and the French have a word "la complosphère" to describe the world of conspiracy theories.  That did seem a wonderful word to me.  But the leader of the group I recall has cancelled tomorrow's meeting because quite a few of the group are having an extended weekend so I don't need to find an article till the week after.  Maybe I will go back to Jeanne de Clisson in any case.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 08 May 2018, 23:56

Lady,

I wanted to comment about female pirates to you and some men as Jean Bart from Dunkirk...I have even a thread about female pirates overhere...
But spent the rest of my evening with brother Cadfael and the English Anarchy period and Eleanor of Acquitaine all due to a kind of Christian "augurs" from MM...but he has not to feel guilty as I learned that much again this evening....

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 09 May 2018, 09:34

Well the Irish lady, Grace O'Malley (anglicised version of her name) has been mentioned on the female seafaring thread I think, but most of the ladies on that thread are bona fidae seafarers rather than rapscallion pirates I think e.g. Artemisia) or maybe I am remembering badly and there are some female pirates there.  nordmann gave quite a bit of information about the lady whose name has been anglicised to Grace.  I'm sure there are other female pirates - I think there was at least one Chinese female pirate but I cannot think of her name to look her up on Wikipedia.  I don't know how reliable "Wiki" is.  A lady I know who is very pro Richard III says the entry in Wikipedia on that monarch gets regularly changed by the different parties (i.e. those who consider him to be innocent will enter something about him on Wikipedia and then those who believe he is guilty as charged will alter the entry on Wikipedia and then the Ricardians will change in back and so on ad nauseam).  If you are going to be sidetracked, PR, I am sure there are worse things to be sidetracked by than Cadfael and the Anarchy.  I didn't have a TV when the adaptation of Cadfael was broadcast in the UK (in the 1990s I think) but saw some of them later on the "Drama" freeview channel (a channel which repeats some older TV programmes).  There's a soap opera (which I've not watched recently) in the UK called "Emmerdale" about Yorkshire farming folk and I was surprised to see the actor who plays Marvin Dingle in the soap (the Dingles are the rough lot in "Emmerdale") playing Cadfael's apprentice monk with a neutral British accent rather than a northern one.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 09 May 2018, 22:16

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
Well the Irish lady, Grace O'Malley (anglicised version of her name) has been mentioned on the female seafaring thread I think, but most of the ladies on that thread are bona fidae seafarers rather than rapscallion pirates I think e.g. Artemisia) or maybe I am remembering badly and there are some female pirates there.  nordmann gave quite a bit of information about the lady whose name has been anglicised to Grace.  I'm sure there are other female pirates - I think there was at least one Chinese female pirate but I cannot think of her name to look her up on Wikipedia.  I don't know how reliable "Wiki" is.  A lady I know who is very pro Richard III says the entry in Wikipedia on that monarch gets regularly changed by the different parties (i.e. those who consider him to be innocent will enter something about him on Wikipedia and then those who believe he is guilty as charged will alter the entry on Wikipedia and then the Ricardians will change in back and so on ad nauseam).  If you are going to be sidetracked, PR, I am sure there are worse things to be sidetracked by than Cadfael and the Anarchy.  I didn't have a TV when the adaptation of Cadfael was broadcast in the UK (in the 1990s I think) but saw some of them later on the "Drama" freeview channel (a channel which repeats some older TV programmes).  There's a soap opera (which I've not watched recently) in the UK called "Emmerdale" about Yorkshire farming folk and I was surprised to see the actor who plays Marvin Dingle in the soap (the Dingles are the rough lot in "Emmerdale") playing Cadfael's apprentice monk with a neutral British accent rather than a northern one.


Lady,

as said, we had here alreaady threads mentioning woman pirates; among others the Irish Grace O'Malley and the Chinese one.
https://reshistorica.forumotion.com/t1008-isabel-barreto-first-woman-admiral-in-history

And sometimes pirates were  also explorers as Francis Drake and others. In fact if one want to be exact it were privateers with a "lettre de marque"
https://www.britannica.com/story/pirates-privateers-corsairs-buccaneers-whats-the-difference

And nearly everywhere come the same names again:
https://www.history.com/news/history-lists/5-notorious-female-pirates


And now your French pirate that I never heard of:
Jeanne de Clisson
http://www.ancient-origins.net/famous-people/lioness-brittany-and-her-black-fleet-pirates-001998

And LiR perhaps for in the French lesson, a chanson about Jeanne
There are no subtitles but you can follow the song with the "ballade?" written underneath the youtube...and it is all in French...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFMTCzDSMrs


Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 09 May 2018, 22:50

OOPS and I forgot as promised our Jean Bart, from the Flemish coast, from Dunkerque, Duinkerke (church on the dunes), Dunkirk...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Bart

Kind regards.
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PostSubject: Edit: Autotext changed 'thread' to 'ahead' before and I didn't notice before.   Thu 10 May 2018, 08:56

You're quite right, Paul, I see that Trike had mentioned Jeanne de Clisson in the earlier thread.  Yes, Jean Bart seems to have  been an active person and some years ago I used to know a French lady originally from St Omer (not sure if she's still around - this was in a different town to where I'm living now and she'd be over 100 if she is still around).  This lady had married an Englishman but I remember her saying that in her girlhood it was still possible to encounter people in French Flanders who spoke Flemish.  (Maybe this was mentioned when we discussed different dialects of French; I know that MM mentioned that in France pre-Napoleon a lot of people spoke different languages other than French itself in different parts of France).  I say that because Jean B seems to have used the Flemish version of his name whenever he had a choice.

Like I say, going back a while I was looking for an article in French to take to the French conversation group I attend.  I had been thinking about female pirates anyway because I had been watching Game of Thrones (outing myself as lowbrow again) and there is a character in that series called Yara (Asha in the books) who is a female pirate.  I found a blog in French with an entry about Jeanne de Clisson and ran that article off though as I said before I've been carrying it in my bag for several weeks and not used it.  It is rather long and we have had an influx of new members to the group so I may need to find something shorter, though Jeanne de Clisson's story (even if like Grace O'Malley's it is sometimes hard to sift what actually happened from the legend) is interesting.  Sorry I'm back to throwing the parentheses around!  Somebody did bring his computer and play some French songs by a French singer (can't remember the name).  It was a bit different from the usual reading of articles.  If I can find something that isn't to heavy going about "la complosphere" I might still go with that.


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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 10 May 2018, 22:25

Lady in retirement,

"complosphère"...one has many in France...

For instance Louis XVII...
"interminable", as the Kennedy conspiracy or Roosevelt knowing in advance about Pearl Harbor...
See a forum where I too contributed: Tribune Histoire under l'affaire Louis XVII
http://www.empereurperdu.com/tribunehistoire/

But I guess it is too complicated to condense it in a short review

Perhaps better known to the general public: "The man in the iron mask" due to the fiction of Alexandre Dumas. Perhaps there is a short survey possible starting from the novel of Dumas, but if you have to do it yourself in French...?
In French:
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homme_au_masque_de_fer
In English:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man_in_the_Iron_Mask

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 11 May 2018, 08:53

Further to the mention of the privateer/corsair Jean Bart ... another well-known French 'commerce raider' was Robert Surcouf of Saint-Malo. During the Napoleonic Wars he operated with considerable success against British shipping in the Indian Ocean and later in the English Channel. After the Bourbon restoration he settled down and formed a very successful merchantile and fishing business operating between Saint-Malo and Newfoundland. Like Jean Bart, over the years he has had several French Navy warships named after him.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 11 May 2018, 23:26

@Meles meles wrote:
Further to the mention of the privateer/corsair Jean Bart ... another well-known French 'commerce raider' was Robert Surcouf of Saint-Malo. During the Napoleonic Wars he operated with considerable success against British shipping in the Indian Ocean and later in the English Channel. After the Bourbon restoration he settled down and formed a very successful merchantile and fishing business operating between Saint-Malo and Newfoundland. Like Jean Bart, over the years he has had several French Navy warships named after him.


Meles meles,

yes Surcouf. I still remember it from the Belgian weekly Tintin/Kuifje. Each week there was a strip of some 4 pages about an item from history. How educational that all was, hunderd thousands of young Belgian children were educated that way. I even believe that the high level of knowledge of the Belgians come all from this weekly Wink
And you don't believe it, I found it on a site. It is in the "Kuifje" of 1958, the year of "our" worldexhibition, the nr. 5 and the strip was from Fred Funcken...
http://www.comicweb.nl/zzstripbladen/Kuifje+Weekblad-1958.html


And of course here is Surcouf:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Surcouf


And conspiracy for LiR about the submarine Surcouf
https://www.warhistoryonline.com/world-war-ii/mystery-surcouf-bombed-rammed-sunk-friendly-fire.html

Meles meles, I will be for some days, hmm till monday thuesday out of "circuit" because of renewal of my computer protection Norton in a computer maintenence centre...
I have still to reply to Nielsen, LiR,  you, Triceratops and a lot to nordmann...excuses to all...

Kind regards from Paul to all the contributors.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 14 May 2018, 15:40

This should have won.



Orkney's unofficial entry

St Magnus
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 17 May 2018, 21:53

Somebody, Dirk I think, mentioned politics on another thread recently (sorry I'm not sure which thread).  I know I have sometimes looked into conspiracy theories though it doesn't mean I believe them.  It's more that I wonder where the ideas spring from.  Now, I don't agree with what Mr Icke avers (that there are a group of "elites" controlling everything) though of course the world is unfair and the resources of the world are distributed in an unbalanced way.  But then if someone makes a mint of money by coming up with a useful invention I don't think they should be condemned (I wish I could come up with a handy invention).  I'm mentioning inventions because some conspiracy theorists maintain that nobody ever has success unless they are part of some sinister cabal.  However, despite the foregoing, recently after Mr Trump and the leaders of the two Koreas suddenly became very palsy-walsy out of the blue I did think - well that was so sudden one could almost think it was orchestrated.  But now it seems the palsy-walsiness has diminished.  (Is there such a word as palsy-walsiness).

Looking at some posts above, Trike as usual can put a smile on folks' faces.

With regard to what Paul says about the man in the iron mask - I watched the first couple of series of the TV show Versailles.  It was well acted but the adaptation of life at Louis XIV's court was only true to the actuality of what happened in part.  Not that I am an expert by any stretch of the imagination but I did learn something of that monarch's reign when I was at school so I had a bit of a clue about what went on.  Series 3 hasn't aired in the UK yet but I am unsure as to whether I will watch it.  It seems the show runners are featuring the "man in the iron mask".  I don't mind a certain amount of dramatic licence in adapting history for the screen but when the facts about a reign are interesting without embroidery I am disappointed when people go with speculation.  Still that happens in loads of adaptations of alleged history.


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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 18 May 2018, 11:48

They didn't win:

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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 18 May 2018, 15:53

The latest addition to the franchise. No doubt the stormtroopers' marksmanship will be as woeful as usual:

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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 18 May 2018, 16:38

@Triceratops wrote:
No doubt the stormtroopers' marksmanship will be as woeful as usual...

Maybe that's because they were equipped with the British Sterling sub-machine gun - but without the magazine and so no bullets.

Military History Now - the real-world weaponry of Star Wars.





Mind you that's better than the Jawas who it seems were just using old sawn-off Lee-Enfield 303s.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 20 May 2018, 19:33

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
Somebody, Dirk I think, mentioned politics on another thread recently (sorry I'm not sure which thread).  I know I have sometimes looked into conspiracy theories though it doesn't mean I believe them.  It's more that I wonder where the ideas spring from.  Now, I don't agree with what Mr Icke avers (that there are a group of "elites" controlling everything) though of course the world is unfair and the resources of the world are distributed in an unbalanced way.  But then if someone makes a mint of money by coming up with a useful invention I don't think they should be condemned (I wish I could come up with a handy invention).  I'm mentioning inventions because some conspiracy theorists maintain that nobody ever has success unless they are part of some sinister cabal.  However, despite the foregoing, recently after Mr Trump and the leaders of the two Koreas suddenly became very palsy-walsy out of the blue I did think - well that was so sudden one could almost think it was orchestrated.  But now it seems the palsy-walsiness has diminished.  (Is there such a word as palsy-walsiness).

Looking at some posts above, Trike as usual can put a smile on folks' faces.

With regard to what Paul says about the man in the iron mask - I watched the first couple of series of the TV show Versailles.  It was well acted but the adaptation of life at Louis XIV's court was only true to the actuality of what happened in part.  Not that I am an expert by any stretch of the imagination but I did learn something of that monarch's reign when I was at school so I had a bit of a clue about what went on.  Series 3 hasn't aired in the UK yet but I am unsure as to whether I will watch it.  It seems the show runners are featuring the "man in the iron mask".  I don't mind a certain amount of dramatic licence in adapting history for the screen but when the facts about a reign are interesting without embroidery I am disappointed when people go with speculation.  Still that happens in loads of adaptations of alleged history.


Lady,

still thinking at your difficulties to find a subject for your French school I thought about another novel of Dumas: The three musketeers (de drie musketiers, les trois mousquetaires)

I saw the film in the Fifties, too much child to understand the story, but yes the American way it is perhaps only for children, perhaps instead of mentioning at the ticket box: children admitted, they better printed: only children admitted...


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Three_Musketeers


I searched for some comprehensive survey of the novel of Dumas, but it is still too complcated for a French school lesson and with the danger of boring the public...
What do you think about a fable of La Fontaine...
le corbeau et le renard: le corbeau sur une arbre perchée...
We had to learn that in the French lesson "par coeur" in the 5th or 6th year at school, 9 or 10 years old...and I still remember the first verses after some 65 years...the first remembrances are the...
http://www.la-fontaine-ch-thierry.net/corbrena.htm



And the English translation:
https://blogs.transparent.com/french/poetry-in-motion-a-translation-of-la-fontaines-most-famous-fable/
 
And you can always say to your public that you know a Dutch speaking guy, who at 9 years old (I was by my birth date a year earlier at the "serious" school), had to "apprendre par coeur ce petit truc (truc=quelque chose)" (I see now that it is in fact a fable from Aesopus)

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 20 May 2018, 19:51

OOPS and after all those year I see that "arbre" est masculin Embarassed Embarassed Embarassed
"What do you think about a fable of La Fontaine...
le corbeau et le renard: le corbeau sur une arbre perchée..."
And it is very important for the "rapport des genres", because if it is "féminin" half of the sentence can be changed...yes we have the same difficult choice in Dutch and German  between masculine, feminine and neutral, but in Dutch we haven't the link? of the genders, in German it is however very complicated


Kind regrds from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 24 May 2018, 20:48

Thank you for your French topic suggestions, Paul.  I took in some comic French verses once - the leader of the class said "This is really silly" though not I hasten to add in a nasty way.  On a more serious note I took some of De Ronsard's poetry and a passage from the online version of Aucassin et Nicolette I mentioned here a few years ago.  Besides the Jeanne de Clisson I did run off (again some while ago) something from a French blog about the dire wolves in Game of Thrones but also mentioning the real extinct creature of the dire wolf and not just the fantasy version in GoT.  I have something about Engrenages (called "Spiral" on BBC) which is a French thriller series I enjoyed (though I had to look at the subtitles - I can't always understand the modern French slang and swearing).  But sometimes it is good to have something which is lighter, not necessarily in language content, but in what it is about.

Now changing the subject I have been doing an online shorthand class tonight - I know shorthand's use has diminished but I like to keep mine ticking over.  The lady who takes the class was dictating something from older books (I don't know if there are in fact any books for shorthand dictation dating from this (as I type) second decade of the 21st century.  Some of the things mentioned in the dictations reminded me just how much the world has changed even in my lifetime.  One said something about many people only living to about 50 years of age at the turn of the (19th to 20th) century.  There was also mention of a hostel for animals being set up in the 1950s at Heath Row airport for animals travelling internationally by plane (the lady dictating said it was still there she thought).  I haven't looked it up but there was something about The Deer Act 1963 (whose details I don't know) but I think its passing had something to do with the changing habitat of deer.  I don't live THAT far from Cannock Chase (it's a bus ride - or could be a hike if I was particularly energetic one day) and at one time I worked with a lady who lived at Brocton (a village on the outskirts of Cannock Chase) who said that deer (fallow deer on Cannock Chase) sometimes came into the gardens in that village.  I know there was some discussion of escaped wild boar foraging in some places in the south of England - I think MM said these were wild board that had probably interbred with domestic pigs.  I think there was some mention of Scottish wild cats on the Moggy Thread at one time.

This has rather been me making a "stream of consciousness" type post in rather a random fashion.  Partly, I didn't want to forget what I was thinking about.  I suppose changes I think of are going from vinyl records (though we didn't have a record player - my parents did buy a reel to reel tape recorder for the family - it was supposed to be for me (among other things) to practise oral French.  I'm not saying it never was never used thus but it was used for recording songs from Top of the Pops).  Then of course in the 1980s the CD came out (there had been cassette recorders of course in the 1970s and during the 1980s if I remember correctly) but now people tend to listen to digitally recorded music.  I have an Elonex which is a poor woman's version of a Kindle but although I've had it a few years I haven't really got to grips with it.  I have been borrowing "real" books from the library though there is an option to borrow e-books so I really should get to grips with the phenomenon of e-books.  When I was working full-time I used to keep up to date with office software more but now apart from Microsoft Word I don't do a great deal.  Well I can use emails of course and I use Microsoft Excel for help with working out my invoices sometimes but then I'm only using the most basic functions.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 24 May 2018, 22:54

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
Thank you for your French topic suggestions, Paul.  I took in some comic French verses once - the leader of the class said "This is really silly" though not I hasten to add in a nasty way.  On a more serious note I took some of De Ronsard's poetry and a passage from the online version of Aucassin et Nicolette I mentioned here a few years ago.  Besides the Jeanne de Clisson I did run off (again some while ago) something from a French blog about the dire wolves in Game of Thrones but also mentioning the real extinct creature of the dire wolf and not just the fantasy version in GoT.  I have something about Engrenages (called "Spiral" on BBC) which is a French thriller series I enjoyed (though I had to look at the subtitles - I can't always understand the modern French slang and swearing).  But sometimes it is good to have something which is lighter, not necessarily in language content, but in what it is about.

Now changing the subject I have been doing an online shorthand class tonight - I know shorthand's use has diminished but I like to keep mine ticking over.  The lady who takes the class was dictating something from older books (I don't know if there are in fact any books for shorthand dictation dating from this (as I type) second decade of the 21st century.  Some of the things mentioned in the dictations reminded me just how much the world has changed even in my lifetime.  One said something about many people only living to about 50 years of age at the turn of the (19th to 20th) century.  There was also mention of a hostel for animals being set up in the 1950s at Heath Row airport for animals travelling internationally by plane (the lady dictating said it was still there she thought).  I haven't looked it up but there was something about The Deer Act 1963 (whose details I don't know) but I think its passing had something to do with the changing habitat of deer.  I don't live THAT far from Cannock Chase (it's a bus ride - or could be a hike if I was particularly energetic one day) and at one time I worked with a lady who lived at Brocton (a village on the outskirts of Cannock Chase) who said that deer (fallow deer on Cannock Chase) sometimes came into the gardens in that village.  I know there was some discussion of escaped wild boar foraging in some places in the south of England - I think MM said these were wild board that had probably interbred with domestic pigs.  I think there was some mention of Scottish wild cats on the Moggy Thread at one time.

This has rather been me making a "stream of consciousness" type post in rather a random fashion.  Partly, I didn't want to forget what I was thinking about.  I suppose changes I think of are going from vinyl records (though we didn't have a record player - my parents did buy a reel to reel tape recorder for the family - it was supposed to be for me (among other things) to practise oral French.  I'm not saying it never was never used thus but it was used for recording songs from Top of the Pops).  Then of course in the 1980s the CD came out (there had been cassette recorders of course in the 1970s and during the 1980s if I remember correctly) but now people tend to listen to digitally recorded music.  I have an Elonex which is a poor woman's version of a Kindle but although I've had it a few years I haven't really got to grips with it.  I have been borrowing "real" books from the library though there is an option to borrow e-books so I really should get to grips with the phenomenon of e-books.  When I was working full-time I used to keep up to date with office software more but now apart from Microsoft Word I don't do a great deal.  Well I can use emails of course and I use Microsoft Excel for help with working out my invoices sometimes but then I'm only using the most basic functions.

Lady,

"Aucassin et Nicolette", I think I still remembers it. I even suppose I made an animated puppet version entry about it overhere for you..
But up to your mentioning I had never heard about it...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aucassin_and_Nicolette
Overhere it was more the medieval: le roman de renard, some times later translated in Middle Dutch
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reynard
And on this link it seems that  de vos Reyaerde first appeared in Latin  by a certain Nivardus in Ghent (nowadays Belgium)
Ysengrimus[edit]
Reynard appears first in the medieval Latin poem Ysengrimus, a long Latin mock-epic written c. 1148–1153 by the poet Nivardus in Ghent, that collects a great store of Reynard's adventures. He also puts in an early appearance in a number of Latin sequences by the preacher Odo of Cheriton. Both of these early sources seem to draw on a pre-existing store of popular culture featuring the character.

And about our Middle Dutch version:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_den_vos_Reynaerde


Deers you said: I think quite recently some days ago? Some crazy animal freaks freed some deers (in Netherland? Belgium? Germany? from a natural parc because they had to be free in the nature...the deers came on the motorway and had to be shot dead by the police...so far some modern oddities...


"changes" you said...yes even the youngsters can follow anymore...what was the latest...the memory stick?...the virtual reality helmet?

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 25 May 2018, 14:43

Well, today is 25th May:

"He's making a list
He's checking it twice
He's gonna find out who's naughty or nice
Santa Claus is in contravention of article 4 of the General Data Protection Regulation (EU) 2016/679"
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 25 May 2018, 22:12

@Triceratops wrote:
Well, today is 25th May:

"He's making a list
He's checking it twice
He's gonna find out who's naughty or nice
Santa Claus is in contravention of article 4 of the General Data Protection Regulation (EU) 2016/679"


Yes Triceratops,

it is started already today
https://www.bcs.org/upload/pdf/gdpr.pdf

And it was also in our national newspapers that perhaps the big enterprises are prepared, because they have quiite a group of legal advisers, but as the papers said not the (in Belgium we have all names in double) PME (petites et moyennes entreprises)/KMO (kleine en middelgrote ondernemingen)...and I can understand that if you are a carpenter working with two men your first conern is to make money and the cost to handle the red tape by an accountant is always a burden to your free enterprise...even a burden en plus adding to the many others...although they are still the backbone of our local industry IMO...


All that to say that I was and still am a supporter of the European Union, but perhaps their nitpicking system of rules is perhaps also a burden as it was in the absolutist rule of France under Louis XIII and XIV. The mercantilism of Colbert.
I started already on the BBC in the time (2006?) with "Why the British and not the French?" And although both used Mercantilism, for instance Navigations Acts against the Dutch republic, the approach was otherwise in Britain than in France...Britain more the Dutch model of freedom on the high seas?
France more the legalist inheritance of the Codex Justinianus?

And now Europe a bit the French way...?
Allthough reading again on it all, I am hesitating again...are the rules not a necessity for having stadards to refer to...
And were those French regulations of Colbert the cause of the later French disasters...?
Perhaps I was in the time too much influenced by Inès Murat's Colbert...?
My own opinion: I have nothing against regulating (hmm as an entrepreneur in restructuring buildings, I was always annoyed by all these rules Wink . Nowadays it is even worser under the Flemish Regional Government, which is also ruling this part of governing...now you have to pay for an official "ventilation specialist" to start your rebuilding...how happy I am that it is for me all past time),
but perhaps they have to start with rules not too much strict and by applying them making the fine tuning?...and after some further application some further fine tuning?..the Belgian federal approach... Wink ?

No, perhaps this subject and history of France is too serious for this "café" and I have to start a new thread...
PS: Some economic approach about the question that I read this evening from an American university:
http://academic.mu.edu/meissnerd/frenchmoney.html

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 29 May 2018, 15:42

Second time lucky getting past the privacy policy statement.

Anyway, some time back Normanhurst posted a question, " where have all the rabbits gone ?", this may be the answer:

RHDV2

though round here, there are plenty of them hopping about.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 29 May 2018, 21:45

There probably are some rabbits around my neck of the woods though I haven't seen any personally recently.  Going back a stretch when I was travelling to Wolverhampton to do some temporary work I can remember seeing some rabbits on a piece of ground that had been grassed over that was between the two sides of a dual carriageway.  Whether their descendants are there to this day I have no idea.

I'm not sure my brain can get round the amendments to the Data Protection Act all at once.

I mentioned that I'm trying to keep myself off the loony side of YouTube - though I do need to use the internet for work.  However, my suggestion box brought up a channel debunking some conspiracy theories.  This one is quite funny https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r5HAgBYBaq8 though it is entirely possible that the person he is debunking is a troll.  The comments are a whole other kettle of fish - some people have found the video funny (which is its intention I think) and others like "He is poisoning the well for us flat earthers".
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 31 May 2018, 11:38

Thinking about the debunking videos I referenced in another post, I was watching one this a.m. (not that I'm trying to put off the household chores which I hate or anything) debunking the chem trail notion (an idea that the contrails we see in the sky when a jet plane has been overhead are actually chemicals poisoning the atmosphere).  One thing he showed was that some of the "truther" YouTubers earn a heck of a lot of money because they have many subscribers.  But I'm digressing, there was a comment (from a good old self-styled "Christian" I guess) saying that the average black person had an IQ of 84.  Prejudiced much?  I remembered hearing something years ago about the late Paul Robeson being so bright that when some of his test papers were marked his scores were way off the chart.  I looked online to see if I could find any verification but I did come across this article [url=https://www.independent.co.uk › Culture › Film › Features]https://www.independent.co.uk › Culture › Film › Features[/url]
According to that article Mr Robeson in his heyday had the potential to sing opera but because of his ethnicity that didn't happen.  It also says that a lot of young people have never heard of Paul Robeson.  I'm not one of those older people who figuratively bash the young for not knowing about things that were well known in my youth but obviously occurred before the births of members of the younger generation.  When I was a child I had heard of the Boer War and World Wars I and II but I didn't know all the ins and outs so one can't expect young people to know about things that happened before their birth or that they haven't been taught or read about.

In the absence of a TV I sometimes get my news from the live Sky news stream on YouTube (though I can log into the BBC news on iplayer too).  I'm not certain how the YouTube algorithm works but I have been getting some "AltRight" news "gems" popping up as suggested videos.  I watched a few (moderation in all things) just to get their measure. (I'll watch Alt-Left things as well - just to know what other people are saying). Some (Alt-Right) featured the jailing of Tommy Robinson (as in the self-styled patriot not the former pop singer) and were certainly giving the impression that the UK was becoming a police state.  Now, I don't think Mr Robinson (or Mr Lennon or whatever his birth name was) is Satan Incarnate hooves, horn, tail and all and I think that those jailing him may have shot themselves in the foot (feet?) metaphorically speaking though technically he did breach the law.  I'm not saying I'd vote for Mr Robinson as man of the year but he has had discourse with the Sikh community so he's not the totally racist POS that he is sometimes portrayed as.  It did strike me that some of the "alternative" news outlets give out if not downright fake at least distorted versions of the news just as much as the mainstream media that they are accusing of broadcasting "fake news".
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 01 Jun 2018, 21:47

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
Thinking about the debunking videos I referenced in another post, I was watching one this a.m. (not that I'm trying to put off the household chores which I hate or anything) debunking the chem trail notion (an idea that the contrails we see in the sky when a jet plane has been overhead are actually chemicals poisoning the atmosphere).  One thing he showed was that some of the "truther" YouTubers earn a heck of a lot of money because they have many subscribers.  But I'm digressing, there was a comment (from a good old self-styled "Christian" I guess) saying that the average black person had an IQ of 84.  Prejudiced much?  I remembered hearing something years ago about the late Paul Robeson being so bright that when some of his test papers were marked his scores were way off the chart.  I looked online to see if I could find any verification but I did come across this article [url=https://www.independent.co.uk %E2%80%BA Culture %E2%80%BA Film %E2%80%BA Features]https://www.independent.co.uk › Culture › Film › Features[/url]
According to that article Mr Robeson in his heyday had the potential to sing opera but because of his ethnicity that didn't happen.  It also says that a lot of young people have never heard of Paul Robeson.  I'm not one of those older people who figuratively bash the young for not knowing about things that were well known in my youth but obviously occurred before the births of members of the younger generation.  When I was a child I had heard of the Boer War and World Wars I and II but I didn't know all the ins and outs so one can't expect young people to know about things that happened before their birth or that they haven't been taught or read about.

In the absence of a TV I sometimes get my news from the live Sky news stream on YouTube (though I can log into the BBC news on iplayer too).  I'm not certain how the YouTube algorithm works but I have been getting some "AltRight" news "gems" popping up as suggested videos.  I watched a few (moderation in all things) just to get their measure. (I'll watch Alt-Left things as well - just to know what other people are saying). Some (Alt-Right) featured the jailing of Tommy Robinson (as in the self-styled patriot not the former pop singer) and were certainly giving the impression that the UK was becoming a police state.  Now, I don't think Mr Robinson (or Mr Lennon or whatever his birth name was) is Satan Incarnate hooves, horn, tail and all and I think that those jailing him may have shot themselves in the foot (feet?) metaphorically speaking though technically he did breach the law.  I'm not saying I'd vote for Mr Robinson as man of the year but he has had discourse with the Sikh community so he's not the totally racist POS that he is sometimes portrayed as.  It did strike me that some of the "alternative" news outlets give out if not downright fake at least distorted versions of the news just as much as the mainstream media that they are accusing of broadcasting "fake news".

Lady,

"But I'm digressing, there was a comment (from a good old self-styled "Christian" I guess) saying that the average black person had an IQ of 84.  Prejudiced much?  I remembered hearing something years ago about the late Paul Robeson being so bright that when some of his test papers were marked his scores were way off the chart.  I looked online to see if I could find any verification but I did come across this article 
https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/features/paul-robeson-the-story-of-how-an-american-icon-was-driven-to-death-to-be-told-in-film-9874111.html

LiR, I read it as a novel.  Thanks for pointing it to me.
And with the coalpitters of Wales Britain...and victim as that many of Mac Carthy...
I first add the youtube about Old man river before I go further in an addendum, otherwise I have trouble each time adding some text and going in preview again, each time to renew the window to restore the youtube again...



Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 01 Jun 2018, 22:03

Addendum to the previous.

LiR, before I go further, I asked myself if Paul Robeson would sing the same in the Show Boat of 1951, that I mentioned to Triceratops as great film in the film and photos thread. I mentioned there the youtube about old man river...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Show_Boat_(1951_film)

And of course not, the McCarthysm was started, it was nearly as bad as today...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McCarthyism


Kind regards, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 01 Jun 2018, 22:59

Lady in retirement,
 
"But I'm digressing, there was a comment (from a good old self-styled "Christian" I guess) saying that the average black person had an IQ of 84.  Prejudiced much?  I remembered hearing something years ago about the late Paul Robeson being so bright that when some of his test papers were marked his scores were way off the chart.  I looked online to see if I could find any verification but I did come across this article 
https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/features/paul-robeson-the-story-of-how-an-american-icon-was-driven-to-death-to-be-told-in-film-9874111.html

Lady, I started in 2002 on the BBC history messageboard, and from that time on I have time and time again in several threads and on several fora (Passion Histoire, Tribune Histoire, Historum), among others: What is a IQ test worth. And about the socalled: Social Darwinism. And against especially Americans, I remember Bloodaxe as I remember him on this board, but on Historum and the BBC he had another name... (now I remember it as in our dialect "Buck" is a male rabbit and skin is "vel" (in our dialect: buksvel)...Buckskin?) all the drivel about race, IQ, physiognomy and all that. Even the point of an American about his cattle that could be changed by breeding...
Also on the several fora: Nature versus nurture. And now I come to my point:
The environment can have a heavy influence on the IQ, even in such away that the Curve of Gauss (the Bell curve?) of a group of people treatened as underdogs, can wander to the lower average, due to the lack of opportunities and by a mental unhappiness that bring them to see themselves as underdogs, for instance black Americans (some parallels with the women status?). Although the real Bell Curve if they would have been treated as the white ones and have had the same real opportunities and perhaps have the same mental behaviour as the Whites, would lay in the same range as this of the White ones. While even science gives the answer that the average brains from both don't differ.
I remember from my start at the BBC that I spoke about an American test in a school. A fortnight the Blacks were the Whites (wearing a white mask) And those white masks had to behave in their role as real Whites and the Whites were wearing black masks had to behave in their role as real Blacks. And the next fortnight it was again the normal roles. But the Whites had learned a lot in the first fortnight and behaved quite otherwise than before...and I don't remember the Blacks perhaps too...

Kind regards from Paul.
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 05 Jun 2018, 14:02

Paul, yes I guess you are right.  The environment does play a part in how somebody flourishes.  Things are changing slowly - I seem to recall a black  barrister won British Mastermind some years back.  I'm sure people will tell me I'm wrong but it does seem to me as a lay person that in the USA a lot of the people of colour who achieve celebrity do so via pop music and sport or maybe drama rather than literary or scientific scholarship.  (I am quite ready - and indeed would be quite pleased - to be proven wrong).  I'll qualify my recent statement by saying I am aware of the writers Maya Angelou, Toni Morrison and James Baldwin and singers such as Marion Anderson and Jessye Norman (who sang a more classical repertoire).  While I was never a fan of "The Pussy Cat Dolls" pop group the lead singer from that group, Nicole Scherzinger can sing well (to my ears at least) when she chooses and has done some musical theatre (rather than actual opera - not that I'm an expert) in London https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tE6SRBnDHx8   I was surprised she could sing a wider range of music than pop.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 06 Jun 2018, 18:43

Something very mundane but I seem to be getting forgetful.  I can't find the plastic bag/envelope thing the consultant gave me to have some blood tests done and my follow-up appointment is on the 15th of this month. I rang up the department and left a message asking for a new one to be sent but nothing yet so if one doesn't came tomorrow I think I'll have to ring and re-arrange my appointment.  My teeth (well permanent teeth) have never been all that wonderful but an onlay has come loose.  I put it in a "safe" place till I could put it in an envelope till I could get it fixed and now I can't remember where the safe place was.  It has to be somewhere so looks like I'll have to have a searching session. I was hoping to go out this evening - mind you with living alone no-one's going to move anything.  Well the cat can sometimes be like Simon's Cat - I've had her jump up and walk on the computer keyboard before now.  Not when I'm doing something like visiting like Res Hist - I mean I like Res Hist but it's to pass the time and for interest.  When I'm doing my odds and ends of typing to boost my pension (mind you that's not a King's ransom) she'll jump.  Anyway, trying to think where I could have left the onlay.....(which my autocorrect keeps changing to only).
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 06 Jun 2018, 20:05

Meles meles,

I don't want to derail the very interesting Thorpe thread, as I many times do with threads...
But after all those years I couldn't resist when I read this:
"Yes indeed, and as a Meles meles fan I was also pleased to see included in the first episode the quirky details about Arthur Gore, the Earl of Arran, who did indeed live in a house along with numerous wild badgers and a dotty speedboat-racing wife. The Earl had been the sponsor in the House of Lords for Leo Abse's 1976 Sexual Offences Act which finally decriminalised homosexuality, as well as sponsoring a bill for the protection of badgers, which wasn't passed. Once asked why this effort had failed, whereas decriminalising homosexuality had succeeded, Arran is reported to have replied: "There are not many badgers in the House of Lords.""

" and as a Meles meles fan"

And suddenly the light came in the darkness...
I think you overestimate the Continentals...because of course for the British it is all quite clear...
I sought for the thread. Wasn't it from Priscilla? about "special ladies" other special males and the difference between bagders and...?
Anyway:
meles meles meles: the European "dasse" (old English), we say in Dutch: "das"
Yes and now I understand why they say "badger"...you bloody badger, always seeking to detect something and unearth it...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_badger



Kind regards from Paul.
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