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 The Tumbleweed Suite

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PaulRyckier
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 06 Jun 2018, 20:05

Meles meles,

I don't want to derail the very interesting Thorpe thread, as I many times do with threads...
But after all those years I couldn't resist when I read this:
"Yes indeed, and as a Meles meles fan I was also pleased to see included in the first episode the quirky details about Arthur Gore, the Earl of Arran, who did indeed live in a house along with numerous wild badgers and a dotty speedboat-racing wife. The Earl had been the sponsor in the House of Lords for Leo Abse's 1976 Sexual Offences Act which finally decriminalised homosexuality, as well as sponsoring a bill for the protection of badgers, which wasn't passed. Once asked why this effort had failed, whereas decriminalising homosexuality had succeeded, Arran is reported to have replied: "There are not many badgers in the House of Lords.""

" and as a Meles meles fan"

And suddenly the light came in the darkness...
I think you overestimate the Continentals...because of course for the British it is all quite clear...
I sought for the thread. Wasn't it from Priscilla? about "special ladies" other special males and the difference between bagders and...?
Anyway:
meles meles meles: the European "dasse" (old English), we say in Dutch: "das"
Yes and now I understand why they say "badger"...you bloody badger, always seeking to detect something and unearth it...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_badger



Kind regards from Paul.
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PaulRyckier
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 06 Jun 2018, 22:44

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
Paul, yes I guess you are right.  The environment does play a part in how somebody flourishes.  Things are changing slowly - I seem to recall a black  barrister won British Mastermind some years back.  I'm sure people will tell me I'm wrong but it does seem to me as a lay person that in the USA a lot of the people of colour who achieve celebrity do so via pop music and sport or maybe drama rather than literary or scientific scholarship.  (I am quite ready - and indeed would be quite pleased - to be proven wrong).  I'll qualify my recent statement by saying I am aware of the writers Maya Angelou, Toni Morrison and James Baldwin and singers such as Marion Anderson and Jessye Norman (who sang a more classical repertoire).  While I was never a fan of "The Pussy Cat Dolls" pop group the lead singer from that group, Nicole Scherzinger can sing well (to my ears at least) when she chooses and has done some musical theatre (rather than actual opera - not that I'm an expert) in London https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tE6SRBnDHx8   I was surprised she could sing a wider range of music than pop.

Lady,

first of all, although many denigrate the Americans (at least overhere) their scientists and novelists are among the best in the world and according to the grandson their universities, especially in science and medical science are the top of the world and the way to the top is even more difficult than in the European ones...don't underestimate the Americans...it aren't all Trumps, and even him Wink ...and mostly it are real Americans and not import from allover the world...
And among these scientists there are many coloured ones...even autochthone ones...

And yes that Nicole Scherzinger can sing...

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 07 Jun 2018, 00:00

Post not specified in the preview that means post lost...

I start again...

I wanted to moan at the corner of the café table with a pint before me...but already that late...and the "patron" perhaps wanting to bed...

But as I am in the mood...

I thought that it was only Nigel Farage, who was denigrating Belgium...


But see now even those "dogmatists" (yes now I remember the Pope statements: of course "dogmas")...
https://www.bbc.com/news/health-44368601

And I even did know what "carbs" were...after a "laborious" research I found out...
And I ask you what's wrong with a Belgian waffle?

Of course if you put it full with whipped cream and chocolate...but if you stuff it with a snuff of "bloemsuiker", didn't find a translation (flour sugar?) as I do nearly every day in the "tearoom", I don't understand how that can be dangerous for the health...?

Rant over... Wink

A salute from Paul...(salute: here a friendly move with the hand and arm...)
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 07 Jun 2018, 10:34

I used to go to a (for mature ladies) keep-fit class until the teacher hurt her leg and had to give up.  Somebody used to give me a lift and once (there were a few of us in the car) things got around to politics in a non-committal way - we didn't reveal how we would vote personally.  I said something like even though I wasn't particularly fond of UKIP I could understand why people could be drawn to them because the leading political parties just don't listen to the voters.  One of the other ladies said something like "I don't" - so not everybody is pro-UKIP in the sceptred isle.  I used to know a lady who belonged to UKIP for a time and she said they were really just another version of the (British) Conservative Party.  A nickname for UKIP (used by people who support it also) is "The Kippers"*.  If Paul reads this, I couldn't find an online translation for "bloemsuiker" either.  I couldn't find any site that did an automatically generated translation for Flemish Dutch rather than Dutch Dutch but there are YouTube videos about learning the basics of what I've always called Flemish but I suppose is more correctly called the Flemish dialect or dialects of Dutch though from the comments on the linked video I don't think the lady giving the talk is herself Flemish.

*  While thinking of food "kippers" (as I'm sure people visiting this board probably know) are smoked herrings.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4uAAniqFFhQ

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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 07 Jun 2018, 10:58

The spacing in my previous post became a bit odd when I linked the YouTube video - I haven't linked anything about kippers either of the fishy or the political variety.  Some people I knew once had a cat (a rescue cat) called Kipper because he used to have lots of naps or short sleeps (which cats always do but perhaps he outdid the average cat).  In the novel Children of the Dead End by Patrick MacGill there is mention of a prostitute being a "kip shop wench" - that was in Scotland and 100 years ago or more and I'm not really au fait with Scottish slang so don't know if that expression is used currently.  I looked the word "kip" up on the internet and it has some meanings I didn't know about but I couldn't copy any link. However I had assumed that the "kip shop wench" evolved because of the slang meaning of "kip" to sleep but apparently a "kip" could mean a brothel in the 18th century (apparently it comes from a Danish word "kippe" meaning an inn - I don't know if that word is still in use in modern Danish).


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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 07 Jun 2018, 11:07

I think I mentioned before that there is a weird conspiracy theory that Belgium doesn't exist.  I think the site linked is a parody site - I hope it is.  https://zapatopi.net/belgium/  It explains the theory if anyone wants to look but members of Res Hist may feel their time is more profitably spent researching topics such as the Thirty Years' War (Thirty Years War?).

To use the apostrophe or not to use the apostrophe that is the question.
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 07 Jun 2018, 14:14

Is the Tumbleweed Suite also the "where to post if you don't know where to post" thread?  I may have mentioned at one time that I - with a few, just a handful really - of other ladies used to partake in an occasional shorthand magazine (it was really stretching it to call it a magazine because our shorthand articles were all handwritten though I always included a typed longhand note in case anyone had a problem with my shorthand outlines).  The magazine is on hiatus at present and has been for a while because the lady who co-ordinated it had some health problems.  Anyway, I was thinking of subjects I could write something (not for profit) about so that I had an article put by in case the magazine comes out of retirement.  Out of the blue I started thinking of John Keats' poem La Belle Dame Sans Merci (maybe I had 19th century poets on my mind because I'd been thinking of Robert Browning the poet).  Looking online I learned that there was a similarly entitled poem written by French poet Alain Chartier (1385-1430 (ish)). If I ever knew about M. Chartier I had quite forgotten about him but if his Wikipedia entry is credible he had something to do with brokering the marriage of Margaret (daughter of James I of Scotland [not England]) and the then dauphin of France.  The poor lady who was married at 11 had an unhappy marriage and died childless aged 20.  Anyway here is the link for the Wikipedia entry about M. Chartier https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alain_Chartier
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PaulRyckier
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 07 Jun 2018, 22:55

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
I think I mentioned before that there is a weird conspiracy theory that Belgium doesn't exist.  I think the site linked is a parody site - I hope it is.  https://zapatopi.net/belgium/  It explains the theory if anyone wants to look but members of Res Hist may feel their time is more profitably spent researching topics such as the Thirty Years' War (Thirty Years War?).

To use the apostrophe or not to use the apostrophe that is the question.

Lady and the others of the team,
 
Tuesday anniversary dinner from me...too much eaten...and after a "transport" of 48 hours...constipation...general practician...not able to contribute to all the interesting messages of today...



And if you read this:
https://zapatopi.net/

The mind boggles...at least mine...

Kind regards from Paul.
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 09 Jun 2018, 11:52

Very quiet on Res Hist at the moment - though I appreciate people have things to do in the real world and not spend all their time online.  I spent a bit of time (after doing what seemed like a boat load of typing yesterday) trying to find out about some of the minority languages in France.  I mentioned on another thread that I had never realised that there was actually a Walloon language in the French speaking part of Belgium (another "Romance" language though I think it is being superseded by standard French or the Belgian take on standard French now).  https://www.omniglot.com/writing/walloon.htm  A couple of the times I went to France I visited the Alsace and was aware that there were people who spoke a sort of Germanic patois - or maybe it was actually a proper version of German - there.  Maybe they still do - it was in the early 1970s I was last there so a long time ago.  I know Alsace and Lorraine get lumped together sometimes but I always considered Lorraine to be completely French in character, possibly because of the children's rhyme "En passant par la Lorraine".  However it seems I was quite mistaken, there is (or at least was) a Germanic dialect "Platt" spoken by some people in Lorraine near the Moselle river. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lorraine_Franconian
I studied German at an elementary level at night school very many years ago but have forgotten any such knowledge I acquired and could not hold a conversation in German; I doubt I'd get by in Walloon either.
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Caro
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 10 Jun 2018, 08:35

If I hadn't taken my LINGO by Gaston Dorren back to the library, I could have mentioned numerous tiny tiny languages all over Europe, many of which I had never heard of before.  There is definitely Breton in France.  That's what I meant to say on another thread (which one?) to Paul, when he queried the author's contention that Iceland was the only country with just one language which no-one anywhere else spoke.  I daresay there are people in Iceland who know other languages, but Iceland is known and spoken and written by everyone and there isn't another country outside Iceland that has an Icelandic community of speakers.  I know my brother-in-law could read Icelandic - he used to lecture on the Icelandic sagas.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 10 Jun 2018, 11:40

I know next to nothing of the Icelandic diaspora, Caro.  When I was much younger I read a few works of the Icelandic writer, Halldor Laxness, but can't remember the details of those books now.  I find that Wikipedia can sometimes be helpful and I found something about a newspaper for people of Icelandic descent in North America.  The Wikipedia article states that the paper no longer prints articles in Icelandic, just English, because Icelandic has fallen out of usage with its readers. I tried to post an extract (in inverted commas of course!!) from the Wikipedia article but when I posted the font came out in a dark colour and virtually unreadable so I'll just put a link to the Wikipedia entry:- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lögberg-Heimskringla   Logberg-Heimskringla is the name of the paper.  

Is there more than one Maori language, Caro, (apologies if the subject has been covered before)?  With Iceland being an island I wondered if island communities tend to hang on to their individual quirks longer (well Britain and Ireland are islands but they aren’t that far away from mainland Europe).  New Zealand is a community of islands of course.  I did think about the Azores but of course they are part of Portugal so I don’t suppose they have their own dialect.


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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 10 Jun 2018, 12:02

I seem to have islands on the brain this morning, so I'll just mention this before I go and do something in the REAL world rather than cyberspace.  While firtling around the internet looking for information about the Azores I read something about there being a community from the Azores on the Channel Islands, so that instructions in the phone boxes there are given in the Portuguese dialect used in the Azores... https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Azores
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 10 Jun 2018, 13:00

@Caro wrote:
There is definitely Breton in France.

Let's not forget the Welsh in Argentina. And I'm not referring to yesterday's (rugby) Union match but rather to the 19th century settlers in Patagonia.

Staying with South America, in neighbouring Chile former general/president Augusto Pinochet was of Breton descent. His family name (which no one seemed to be able to agree on how to pronounce) was originally believed to be something like Pen-O-Ghett.

Talking about disputed pronunciations of family names, then David Bowie was recorded as pronouncing his own name as 'Bowie' but then also as 'Baowie' on separate occasions. When asked about this he said that his name is pronounced like the American knife but didn't give a demonstration. That knife is commonly pronounced 'Buwie' thus he cheekily introduced a third option.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 10 Jun 2018, 15:04

@Caro wrote:
There is definitely Breton in France.

And Occitan. The differences between different languedoc dialects, such as Gascon, Provençale or Narbonnaise etc, have now been largely unified into a single langue d'Oc - Occitan - and this is now offered as a second language, after French, in secondary schools in the south of France in much the same way that Catalan is. The regional government newsletter distributed to every household throughout the area represented by the devolved regional assembly - ie covering the whole of the south of France from the Spanish to Italian borders - always has at least one page/article in French, then Catalan, then Occitan.  I have had a few Occitan speakers staying here ... thankfully they only spoke Occitan between themselves and spoke French to me and everyone else, as it is quite distinct and certainly more so than 'just a dialect'.

Apparantly Occitan has quite a lot of similarity to Cajun (or rather visa versa) - that is the French-based patois spoken around New Orléans and Louisiana in the US, as many of the original French settlers came from Provence/Marseilles. My partner was a Belgian Francophone (ie Wallon) and after completing school and his baccalaureat in Brussels, he spent a year at a US High School in Louisiana, to perfect his 'English'. According to him many local people there still spoke a type of French ie Cajun, at home, but whenever they tried it on him he could barely understand them, and it wasn't just a strong accent but a whole raft of unusual conjugations, words and expressions.


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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 10 Jun 2018, 20:02

How far are you from the French Basque country, MM?  I saw the names of the rivers given in both French and Basque in Bayonne.  There are some videos about Louisiana French on YouTube - the one I've linked is about animals.  I don't think the names themselves are greatly different from standard French but maybe the accent is.  
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 11 Jun 2018, 02:05

In reply to LIR re the Maori language, there is now really only one form officially of it, though down south where I live, there are remnants of the former dialect in the place names.  They use K instead of the usual Ng, pronounced as in the ng in sing or just as 'n'. Our Lake Waihola seems to be from the same root as Waihora.  (They both mean spreading water.) 
But the written form of Maori just came with the English settlers,  Maori was a purely verbal language before that, which makes their insistence on correct pronunciation in accord with the spelling a little odd.  Or changing the spelling - the city of Wanganui has just become Whanganui for instance, as Maori said there was no such word as Wanga in Maori.  (Nui means large.)

Wh is often pronounced as an "f" which I presume the dialect of the time didn't allow or at least the dialect used by the people involved in the production of the dictionary.  The dictionary-makers must have heard a more sibilant wh.  Like the English wh.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 11 Jun 2018, 09:18

Caro, thank you for your response.  Did you ever study Pitman shorthand?  There are separate signs for 'wh' and 'w' in that system.  Thinking of languages, later this morning I am off to my sign language class.  The teacher said to compose a story bringing in various colour signs so I thought bring in something of the truth so I looked up the sign for a 'weed' meaning I would mention the weed in my garden but online I could only find 'weed' as in marijuana.  There may be something more fitting in my BSL/English dictionary upstairs.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 11 Jun 2018, 10:28

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
How far are you from the French Basque country, MM? 

I'm the other end of the Pyrénées, the Mediterranean end: not very far away but linguistically we are many miles apart. The Basque language, Euskara, is unrelated to any other European language and is believed to be one of the few surviving pre-Indo-European languages. Inevitably though modern Basque has adopted a lot of vocabulary from Romance languages like Spanish or French, or more specifically perhaps Aranese, which is the dialect of Occitan spoken in neighbouring Gascony, to the North, and in the Val d'Aran in northwestern Catalonia, to the South-East, (Aranese is one of the three official languages, alongside Spanish and Catalan, in Catalonia).
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 11 Jun 2018, 20:41

@Meles meles wrote:
@LadyinRetirement wrote:
How far are you from the French Basque country, MM? 

I'm the other end of the Pyrénées, the Mediterranean end: not very far away but linguistically we are many miles apart. The Basque language, Euskara, is unrelated to any other European language and is believed to be one of the few surviving pre-Indo-European languages. Inevitably though modern Basque has adopted a lot of vocabulary from Romance languages like Spanish or French, or more specifically perhaps Aranese, which is the dialect of Occitan spoken in neighbouring Gascony, to the North, and in the Val d'Aran in northwestern Catalonia, to the South-East, (Aranese is one of the three official languages, alongside Spanish and Catalan, in Catalonia).


Meles meles, (and LiR and Vizzer and Caro)

I wanted to say the same to LiR...but have to reply a lot to others too, especially to Vizzer and LiR, as I was from Tuesday evening in the clinic, while I had some "bacteria" in the blood and they said I couldn't have fever from a constipation...and fearing again for a sepsys...but is was false alarm...and again the whole series of examinations...but the better so I know it was not the urine (conductors?) as before...
This evening already mislead by nordmann's thread as I without reading the context thought about William II, the brother in law of Charles II when Vizzer replied this evening on that thread, but wiht the "rufus" addition I saw that it was not my William II...of course you English people (British people) know it all as it is part of your "national" curriculum...In the Fifties we had in Belgium a "national" one starting with Clovis (Latin of Chlodovec-changing later in Lodewijk, in Ludwig (an in the opinion of some experts...Ludwig to Louis...)

Will try to diminish my backlog as soon as possible...

Kind regards to every one from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 12 Jun 2018, 19:09

@Caro wrote:
But the written form of Maori just came with the English settlers

And neither are they the only ones to have suffered this linguistic fate. Quite a few languages were first put down in written form by English speakers whose own language is infamously illogical in its spelling and thus singularly ill-suited to the task. I’m minded of the Korean family name ‘Park’ (there was a President Park in the 1970s for example). That name should really be transcribed as Pahk or Paak or even just Pak.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 13 Jun 2018, 04:51

Well, judging from Maori reaction they seem to have got it pretty accurate here: Maori get steamed up if you pronounce it not according to the correct spelling and the pronunciation they give to that spelling.  (Maori in the media that you hear about do; I think Maori in real life are more tolerant if you are prepared to try.  They just get a bit annoyed at names like Wakitipu being pronounced without the final 'u', and the 'o's being pronounced as an 'oh' rather than the 'aw' sound they use.  I suppose that latter sort of thing does come down to poor transliteration.  

I live in Owaka, pronounced by most including me usually as Oh-wocka, but supposed to Aw-waka.  To confuse matters, all Maori vowels have a long and short form, which are shown by a macron or a doubling of the vowel.  But often in writing that is not used.  I should spell Maori as Maaori. And every vowel is pronounced (though I have noticed when Maori talk of their taonga (treasure, something very valued) they seem to just call it "tonga".
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 13 Jun 2018, 10:01

Thanks to everyone who has posted information about the various languages.  On a more prosaic note, there has been something quirky in the British press.  Apparently someone in the Devon town of Colyton contacted a lady who had some washing hanging in her garden (the front it seems - maybe she doesn't have a large back yard?) objecting that the washing was on view.  It seems that the less uptight members of the community have rallied to the lady's support and have taken to hanging washing where it can be seen https://www.metro.news/thats-pants-residents-launch-laundry...in...of.../1098079/  I wonder how the objector would have fared if he/she had lived in a back-to-back house?  Fortunately we don't really have those anymore (well there are some in Birmingham as a sort of museum I think) but people who lived in them had no choice but to string their washing across the street.  People probably know but just in case anyone whose first language is not English is wondering there is an English slang expres​sion(relatively recently entered the language I think) calling something bad "pants".  If I think a non-English actor or actress had a bad English accent I could say "X's "English" accent is pants".

Wasn't there something on one thread (I can't remember which - was it earlier in this one) mentioning when washing lines first came into use and that people used to hang their apparel on bushes to dry etc?
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 13 Jun 2018, 11:31

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
Wasn't there something on one thread (I can't remember which - was it earlier in this one) mentioning when washing lines first came into use and that people used to hang their apparel on bushes to dry etc?

Yes indeed, and if I remember it right, it seemed that even when clothes-lines did eventually come into regular use, it was quite some time before anyone invented the clothes-peg.

And now while I'm here I'll just have a little moan ...

It’s just 10 days to Midsummer’s Day and only a month until Bastille Day when nearly the whole of France starts their summer hols … and yet it seems like spring has only just started let alone summer. You in Britain might all be basking in glorious hot sunny weather but here it’s been pouring with rain nearly every day for weeks now, and the nights are still almost chilly. And in the garden everything is about 3 – 4 weeks late. I harvested the last of my broad beans last weekend (in 2017 they were all finished by the first week in May), which has finally freed up space to plant out my tomato and aubergine plants which have been confined to pots since they germinated way back in March. But nearly all the French beans and onions that I’d sowed in April have simply rotted in the ground as it’s been too cold and wet. The only things doing well are the potatoes, lettuces and courgettes, and even they are suffering with being continually splattered with mud or having their leaves shredded by hailstones. Meanwhile the grass and weeds keep shooting up requiring regular mowing, if only it would stay dry for just a day or so. Still, the damp weather has been very good for wild mushrooms. So much for being a mere 40km from the sunny, sandy beaches of the Mediterranean coast!
 
And where is everyone? Has anyone heard anything of Temp, Priscilla, or Ferval? Temp I thought had mentioned being about to move house, but I don’t think Ferval or P have been around here for a couple of months now. I hope everyone is alright and just occupied with summery projects or hols.
 
I wanted to thank Ferval for a suggestion she made a couple of years ago for a quick simple dessert (for Burns’ Night at the time): cranachan. I had a Spanish couple staying here two nights ago, and, having arrived by motorbike, were thoroughly soaked and saddle-sore when they got here and so I didn’t have the heart to suggest they go out again to the village restaurant, just 2km away, but it was still pouring with rain. So I rustled up some food from the rather meagre stock of things I had in the fridge, freezer and garden. And one thing I do have just at the moment is an abundance of ripe black mulberries from the tree in the garden. So with some Quaker Oats, cream, honey, a dash of whiskey, and luscious, ripe, juicy mulberries in place of the usual raspberries, I did cranachan – very quick and easy, tasty and nicely typical ‘British’ (the French would actually probably say it was 'Anglais' but Ferval would probably have my guts if I claimed that). I’ll definitely do that again, to which end I’m now freezing down small bags of mulberries, ready for use throughout the year, as they'll all be gone in only another fortnight.
 
And on that note, seeing as it is now passed midday here and the sun has finally come out, we could have a little apéro. Any takers? I have a bottle of a white Chardonnay from Pezilla (just outside of Perpignan) ready-chilled and already open.


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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 13 Jun 2018, 11:52

Thank you, Mm, I would like some cold, very dry white wine, please.

About the weather here, until some 5-6 weeks ago it still felt almost like winter, then a week and a half of springish weather, followed by summer days with temperatures [sorry Temps, no pun intended] nearing the high 20es Celsius, and no rain for four weeks, then this last week with a few showers and still a little less than 20 degrees, it's wearing for the farmers, and it seems like the fire hydrants have been chasing the dogs in some towns.



Edited because of bad translation.
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Meles meles
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 13 Jun 2018, 12:03

@Nielsen wrote:
... and it seems like the fire hydrants have been chasing the dogs in some towns.

An enchanting mental image ... perhaps the hydrants getting their own back on the dogs for pissing up against them ... but I think something got lost in translation there too, no?  Or were you referring to a particular Danish proverb, allusion, idiom, or saying?  If so, then maybe I think I'm the dummy, no?  Smile .



Cheers


Last edited by Meles meles on Wed 13 Jun 2018, 15:58; edited 3 times in total
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Nielsen
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 13 Jun 2018, 12:14

Alas, one may some times pass the image, but at times the background is missing.

Cheers.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 13 Jun 2018, 12:23

I had a post disappear into cyberspace.  Maybe I tried to post at the same time as MM.  From memory  was commiserating with MM and saying that today started off sunny where I live but is now clouding over.  I was going to go out with some spray on weedkiller to tackle at least the weeds on the crazy paving and the paths but I don't want it to go to waste if the heavens open and the rain washes the weedkiller away before it can do its work.

I don't know about Priscilla, Ferval and Temperance and of course I also hope they are well.  I seem to have a memory of Ferval doing some dog-sitting at one time at a place where there was either no internet access or very bad internet access.

MM at present my "gardening" is just damage limitation.  Since I had the coeliac disease diagnosed (and before although I didn't know what it was) I sometimes get fatigued suddenly and just don't feel like doing DIY or gardening or even just ordinary household chores.  It's not all the time and it's not so bad since I have been avoiding gluten but sometimes I get cross-contaminated.  I have a couple of quite big itchy lumps on my left arm at present which can be an effect of gluten in my system - but then I was wearing a short sleeved shirt yesterday so the lumps could be insect bites.  Flying insects with me seem to be "Fee fie fo fum I smell the blood of an English woman".
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 13 Jun 2018, 12:27

Ha ha, the dog answering the call of nature against the hydrant is funny.  Nielsen, if the farmers in Denmark are feeling the strain I hope they don't do what their distant ancestors did and go a-viking on to the shores of this sceptred isle.  I read somewhere (it might have been on Rest Hist, I'm not sure) that Vikings were not necessarily full-time marauders but sometimes farmers who went off a-viking periodically.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 14 Jun 2018, 13:21

[url=hejsonderborg.dk/a-crash-course-in-danish-for-fans-of-forbrydelsen/]hejsonderborg.dk/a-crash-course-in-danish-for-fans-of-forbrydelsen/[/url]  As I have posted a few comments about things Belgian recently I suppose I should mention something Danish. The Guardian created a very brief video about speaking Danish following on the popularity of the Danish series The Killing. 
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PaulRyckier
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 14 Jun 2018, 23:02

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
[url=hejsonderborg.dk/a-crash-course-in-danish-for-fans-of-forbrydelsen/]hejsonderborg.dk/a-crash-course-in-danish-for-fans-of-forbrydelsen/[/url]  As I have posted a few comments about things Belgian recently I suppose I should mention something Danish. The Guardian created a very brief video about speaking Danish following on the popularity of the Danish series The Killing. 

 
I join you and Nielsen about the feeling with the misery of MM...

Lady about:

https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/video/2012/nov/16/danish-the-killing-video
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0826760/

I never saw it here in Belgium...and here it is always the original with subtitles...
But we had here at least sometime a Danish-German-Belgian international police series...it is always my wife who is looking and from time to time, if I am entering in the room, I stay watching.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Team_(2015_TV_series)
From what I saw it was not too interesting. I more like a German "krimi"

But we had here also the Sandham Murders, the Swedish series...and that I liked very much...and when I had the opportunity...
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1846197/?ref_=ttep_ep_tt


Kind regards from Paul.

PS: MM, I thought it was Islanddawn, who was moving, she didn't say to where...
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