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 The Tumbleweed Suite

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PaulRyckier
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 16 Jul 2018, 21:53

@Meles meles wrote:
@PaulRyckier wrote:

Although: "un beau clivage entre ses seins" in French sounds also rather decent?

My Collins English/French Dictionary, while again giving no direct one word translation for a woman's cleavage, does give as an example this rather delightful expression to describe, say, a dress that revealed her cleavage:

... une robe qui laissait voir la naissance des seins (literally, a dress which allowed one to see the birth of her breasts). How charming.

Meles meles,

excuses yesterday busy with the refurbishing of the appartement, as I already told about...
Yes the French they can say it in their natural charming way...in Dutch I would say: die juist het begin van de welving van de borsten liet zien (which let just see the beginning of the curbing of the breasts) agreed, much less poetic than the French...

Kind regards from Paul.
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 24 Jul 2018, 01:09

I was listening recently to a podcast which mentioned that the expression "fake news" was coined by one Mrs H Clinton rather than one Mr D Trump but I seem to recall somebody on Res His posted a cartoon of "fake news" with somebody in what could have been Edwardian or Victorian dress but I can't find which thread it was on.  Using the search facility has not helped.  Has anybody a better memory than myself where the cartoon might be located?
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Caro
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 24 Jul 2018, 05:01

I was reading a (very good) book set in southern America in 1929 and the author had someone saying 'fake news' there, which disappointed me a little as I didn't think it dated back that far.  It was based on the true story of Ella May Wiggins who co-lead a union strike at a cotton mill and was killed by people on the opposite side - it seemed uncertain if it was a police-led raid or just company people.
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 24 Jul 2018, 09:09

Do you know the name of the book, Caro?  I had a look on Wikipedia about Ella May Wiggins and it mentions a book called "Strike!" by Mary Heaton Vorse (whose work I have not read - not yet anyway).  Ms Wiggins seems to have been a remarkable lady and the people who shot her literally got away with murder.  Thank you for the information, Caro.
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Caro
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 24 Jul 2018, 22:59

It was The Last Ballad by Wiley Cash, LIR.  I have ranked it as the best book I have read in 2018, though often I go back and downgrade some.  I don't think I will with this one.  People on Goodreads worried about not connecting enough with Ella, but that sort of thing doesn't worry me.  I don't have to emphasize with people to manage to understand their story and feelings.  
And then they were bothered by the shifting points of view but since Cash pointed out clearly at the beginning of each chapter whose pov this was and the date it was using, I am not sure what they were complaining about.  (Having said all that, generally the Goodreads reviews were very good, though I couldn't find any from the Guardian or The Times, or anything really reputable.)
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 24 Jul 2018, 23:23

Caro, I saw that you just dropped in...

"though often I go back and downgrade some.  I don't think I will with this one...."

I mostly stay with my first appreciation...good or bad or in the middle...but after my 60 years experience I suppose I became more and more critical and diificult to meet my criteria...and I suppose my personallity is also a bit changed over the years...as I started at nine as I said to the Lady in retirement with "Lord Lister"... they called it "pulp" literature...but as my grandmother read it where my sister and I were at home in that time...there is a photo of it upriver of this thread...
And the access to good literature is also important... it was important that I in the time could read in the bigger city libraries as Ostend and Bruges...and access to bigger second hand bookshops...

Kind regards from Paul.
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 25 Jul 2018, 09:24

The "Song of Ice and Fire" novels that the TV series "Game of Thrones" is based on use a point of view narrative (third person narrative but you see the story unfold variously from the points of view of different characters) so I might be able to stick with The Last Ballad. I'm more likely to have a problem finding it in the local library but things can be pre-ordered on library loan.  The Wikipedia article did mention did mention Ms Wiggins was a balladeer but sometimes one has to take Wikipedia with a grain of salt.

On a less serious note, I think I have found (when I wasn't particularly looking) a possible source for the videos that somewhat distracted me last year that asserted a number of cisgender celebrities were in fact transgender.  It had to do with a hoax, well an April 1st prank, played by a gossip site "Blind Gossip" about 6 years ago that Brad Pitt had been born a girl.  Blind Gossip did say that BP was male and had always been male and that it was all an April Fool day prank though.  More "fake news".
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 25 Jul 2018, 20:34

Lady,

I was brought up with the terms homos which in our connotation was more about men and with its many trivial and dialectical equivalents, while for lesbians, we had no term or it had to be: wives for the wives (wuven for the wuven), we had also terms for masturbation, as for a little dog: a "gatlekkertje" ( they translate "gat" as "butt", but in fact it is meant as a clitoris licker and as it is a little dog it is the diminutive of it) and van modern reading I was already used to the term "transgender", but now you come with "cisgender"
Lady can you perhaps explain me the subtile difference between transgender and cisgender? Or is it not subtile but more substantial?

Kind regards from Paul.
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 25 Jul 2018, 20:52

It's not that difficult, Paul, it's like cisalpine Gaul and transalpine Gaul - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cisalpine_Gaul with cisalpine Gaul being what is now part of north Italy but was then considered part of Gaul (at the time of the Roman Empire) that was on the same side of the Alps as Rome and transalpine Gaul was the part of Gaul which was on the opposite side of the Alps to Rome, so in Cisalpine Gaul you didn't cross the Alps to get there (i.e. from Rome you didn't cross them) but to get to transalpine Gaul you did have to cross the Alps (from Rome) and the same prefixes trans and cis are applied to gender.  A transgender person is someone who has crossed over from one gender to the other by choice (not an intersex person who is the way they are because of how he or she was born).  I am linking a clip about April (previously George) Ashley who was one of the earliest known British people to have had a "sex change" operation though of course AA's chromosomes would still be XY https://youtu.be/ImZgPALy_NY  A cisgender person is someone who has never changed his or her sex - who has never "crossed over" i.e. the majority of people, for example your wife and myself are cisgender women and you are a cisgender man.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 25 Jul 2018, 22:28

Lady,

yes I knew about Gallia Transalpina and Gallia Cisalpina...
https://www.shorthistory.org/ancient-civilizations/ancient-rome/secret-alliance-between-caesar-pompey-and-crassus-first-triumvirate/



But now it starts:

" A transgender person is someone who has crossed over from one gender to the other by choice (not an intersex person who is the way they are because of how he or she was born).  I am linking a clip about April (previously George) Ashley who was one of the earliest known British people to have had a "sex change" operation though of course AA's chromosomes would still be XY https://youtu.be/ImZgPALy_NY  A cisgender person is someone who has never changed his or her sex - who has never "crossed over" i.e. the majority of people, for example your wife and myself are cisgender women and you are a cisgender man."

Yes "transgender": changing sex by choice (we have here had someone who recently changed sex with a lot of media brouhaha because he was TV presentator or something like that and now it is a woman...
You say "cisgender": who has never crossed over. As I understand it: the people, who feel as in the gender, which the environment put them on from observation?
But what with someone, who is brought up in a role because of his/her sex "appearance", but has a feeling from the mind that he/she, that they are attracted by the same sex...and I am not kidding you now because I have had in the very inner circle, a male, who felt attracted to the same sex and not coming in terms with it commited suicide...and I have followed the process...
is that and intersex person then? You said: "not an intersex person who is the way they are because of how he or she was born"

And then another question, which came up to me...who is in a homo relation "the man" and who the "woman"? Or are they both "equal"?
I never dare to ask...but the mother of one male homo couple in my family said that her son certainly is the "man" in the family...and as I have seen it from the attitude to the new born adopted son from the other male, he certainly has a "mother" appearance...
and one of our female tenants who together with her man, are regulars in a lesbian "café", becaus the beer of the tap is excellent overthere, says that from the two lesbian landlords one said that she is the female and the other female the man, because she is doing all the work and the other one lazy and does nearly nothing but command...

PS: And now I recall about the masturbation I mentioned in my previous message: it was not a "gatlekkertje" dog (as "gat" is the opposite side of the "clitoris" side, but in real it was a "truttelekkertje" dog (little truttelicker dog)

And now my time is gone again for my "Orwell Socialism" for Nielsen Wink

Kind regards to both from Paul.
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 26 Jul 2018, 01:02

Paul, I don't understand how things work for same sex couples or if one partner would be more dominant.  "Cisgender" to my understanding is the average person who stays the gender he or she is born; I don't think it has anything to do with sexual persuasion.  "Intersex" to my understanding is what used to be called "hermaphrodite" but it covers various different conditions though those conditions are relatively rare.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intersex  I stumbled on a documentary once about people with intersex conditions.*  I can remember two of the conditions one of which was  AIS (Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome) where an XY foetus is insensitive to androgens in the womb and develops outwardly like a girl (or partially like a girl depending on the seriousness of the situation) though the person does not have a womb  https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/androgen-insensitivity-syndrome/ and there is also Klinefelters syndrome where a male has an extra (sometimes more than one extra) X chromosome https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/klinefelters-syndrome/  There are other intersex conditions but I can't remember all their names.  So an intersex condition is a physical one that somebody was born with and which was not by his or her choice whereas a transgender person has chosen to undergo a medical process to outwardly appear as the opposite gender to the one in which he or she was born.  I've not explained it awfully well - I'm not medically qualified.

* The documentary I think was called Secret Intersex - it may be on YouTube but it is quite long and quite intensive.  A link to some AIS people talking on YouTube, though the sound quality is not so good (short video - the person in the middle is Belgian).  
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 26 Jul 2018, 10:43

Lady,

thank you so much for all your in depth information...I learnt a lot from it. And yes some youngsters have quite some problems from birth on. And now I understand fully about what you were talking about...I think...
Even yesterday evening I started to understand the differences I suppose...the same sex leaning ones are others than those who want to change their sex because they feel with their mind as having another sex than this they are born in...and some want to change that physical sex to another physical sex that corresponds with their feelings of mind?
And excuses for deviating this serious subject with terms as "truttelekkertje"...

Again thanks for explaining and kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 27 Jul 2018, 09:41

Today I am mentioning something very mundane.  I know MM and PR have to do a certain amount of DIY on property.  I have actually reached out to my hairdresser whose husband is a professional odd job type of repairman.  Trouble is of course if they are any good they are booked up far in advance.  I mentioned before I had a cracked window in the front room - it's got worse.  I was sort of making do with duct tape and polyester bagging but some more glass dropped out overnight.  I'm going to have to get it done professionally.  I can think of one other person who might be able to do it if my hairdresser's hubby is too busy but can anybody think of a running repair that I can effect pro temp.  I thought I had some hardboard but have used up last bit.  At the moment it's an old wipedown tablecloth with the screen from in front of the (unused) front room hearth balanced at an angle.  Thunderstorms are foretold as a possibility today but of course things happen at the worst time possible - 'tis always the way.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 28 Jul 2018, 13:46

I managed to find some nails (and I'm sure I have a few more) so managed to bang in some nails to the hardboard (I found some hardboard - well actually it is what the screen in front of the front room hearth was made of - only the front was covered) to put over most of the window and am using plastic and cardboard for the top part.  If I'd only thought (the hot wether seems to slow me down mentally as well as physically) there is a builders' merchants within walking distance of where I live but it's closed now until Monday morning.  There's been a bit of rain here (west midlands of England) and it's blowy.  However if I go to the unofficial sign language meeting (the class has closed for summer break but some of us are intending to meet informally) on Monday there is an old-fashioned hardware shop near the venue for the sign language class so I should be able to pick up some new nails if I go there.  I should really have some put by for emergencies.  And to think I used to be a Girl Guide (the Girl Guides' motto being "Be Prepared") - tut, tut.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 28 Jul 2018, 14:50

If you're going to an 'old-fashioned hardware shop', they might well stock ordinary window glass and be able to sell you a pane cut to whatever exact size you need. Replacing a window pane is not a difficult nor complicated job and doesn't need any special tools, so you might like to consider doing it yourself rather than paying out for a glazier to come and do it.

If going DIY all you need to do is break out all the old glass (careful - don't cut yourself) and scrape/gouge out all the old dry putty with an old knife, screw-driver or whatever. Then lay in a bead of new putty (remember to buy a small pot from the hardware store while you're there) all around the angle. Then fit in the new pane bedded on the putty base; secure it in place with a couple of panel pins or very small nails lightly tapped into the underlying wood at top and bottom (being very careful not to crack the new glass); and then run putty all around the outside, gently press it in, and smooth it off to look nice. Et voila. Then wait about three weeks for the putty to dry before you paint over it - or don't even bother painting it.

As I say it is a simple job - and I'm sure you'll find a youtube covering it - but it does need a fairly gentle touch and so it isn't a task to be rushed otherwise you risk, as I have done, cracking the new pane just when you've nearly finished the job. But glass itself isn't expensive so if you're getting a pane cut to size and have other windows with exactly the same-sized glass panes, you might consider getting two panes cut while you're at your hardware store. That way if you do accidentally crack the first one there's a second ready to hand, and if not then you've always got a spare to repair any future broken windows.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 28 Jul 2018, 23:53

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
I managed to find some nails (and I'm sure I have a few more) so managed to bang in some nails to the hardboard (I found some hardboard - well actually it is what the screen in front of the front room hearth was made of - only the front was covered) to put over most of the window and am using plastic and cardboard for the top part.  If I'd only thought (the hot wether seems to slow me down mentally as well as physically) there is a builders' merchants within walking distance of where I live but it's closed now until Monday morning.  There's been a bit of rain here (west midlands of England) and it's blowy.  However if I go to the unofficial sign language meeting (the class has closed for summer break but some of us are intending to meet informally) on Monday there is an old-fashioned hardware shop near the venue for the sign language class so I should be able to pick up some new nails if I go there.  I should really have some put by for emergencies.  And to think I used to be a Girl Guide (the Girl Guides' motto being "Be Prepared") - tut, tut.

Lady,

I join MM about his recommandations, but in my humble opinion it is not that easy as MM says. And I have some experience. Put glass for a greenhouse on wooden supports, the glasses some 40 cm width (16 inches?) and 12 inches height and in that time for the money, we made our putty ourselves with "lijnzaadolie" (linseed oil?) and "kalk" (chalk?)
But back to the practice...with the little nails MM is right and I do it myself also that way as I am used to it to insert them with the hammer, but for a would be I find it risky. I put glass also in the frame without nails...first make a small sausage from the mass in your hand continuously with your fingers and put that sausage continuously into the angle of the cleaned frame and then put it with your fingers or with the special tool that I will show, fully  along the whole frame deep in the cleaned edgeof the frame...then press the glass gently into that prepared frame and push gently with your hand and fingers till the glass is fully inserted in the frame...some putty will surface from between the edge of the frame and the glass...add to this irregural pouring out, the same way with a sausage till you have a regular band...then with the special tool that I will show (we call it a "mastiekmes" (couteau de mastique?)) In Dutch they say "stopverf" for "mastiek") you make the surface of the putty smooth and in an angle of 45°...I think the best way is to strike? to brush? sweep? from up to down... 
And if you have the "routine" you can do it for others too...and later perhaps try with the small nails...the trick is to give them a little tick while holding them between the finger and the glass so that they are inserted provisionally in the wood, always letting glide the hammer gently along the glass...and then hammer them defenitely the same way...
The special tool:
http://www.aimstools.be/nl/pinguin-mastiekmes-laurierblad-houten-greep---staal-17323

But look that you obtain this one:

The one with the two sides with the line in the middle making the special shape...
But lady let you not fool with this one:
https://www.gamma.be/nl/assortiment/gamma-plamuurmes-hout-40-mm/p/B559194
I did once the job with this "plamuurmes" (in our dialect we call it an "enduitmes"), while I hadn't a "mastiekmes", and it works,,; but not efficient and the surface is not smooth as with the other tool...

But if I am right your problem would be to bring the on size cut glass panel to your home?...if you can make it walking...or with the car of a friend...or they deliver perhaps at home...or with the bus...
Don't laugh...and I disgress...and in the time it was another way of life...as nearly nobody had a car...my parents one of the first carowners, but not in that time...because my father was from Bruges and he knew a shop with Singer sewing machines and it had for my parents to be this specific one...as if they had not the same in the Ostend shops...but nevertheless bought in Bruges and then carrying both walking with the machine to the nearest bus stop...and there with the machine to Ostend...and there the tramway to Bredene...and from that tramstop to home again walking...

Lady, and even more disgressing...
yesterday evening not able to attend the board...the lady wanting to a well known local singer in the Casino of Blankenberge...and if the lady wants I mostly at the end agree to the proposal...the hall, not the Casino (while there they are inviting people, who mostly let their money overthere) not very easy to find, no indications... first they said it is the elevator on the second floor, but it wasn't there...then they said on the third floor but that one didn't exists and then finally without indication on the fourth floor with a slope to the hall...more a vetusted? (of age) hall...
And then the singing, as my wife came for a specific singer as announced, we saw him only twice, with some 8 or 10 numbers...perhaps because he is too old: 72 but acclaimed by his fan club, arrived with busses from allover the country and such public is never disappointed...but we not regulars, had expected more...perhaps because of his age "encadré (omkaderd) "emframed? by some other singers (three quarters of the content) and during 4! houres with 20 minutes pauze...but of course as said for the fans...

Kind regards from Paul.
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 29 Jul 2018, 09:03

Thank you Paul and MM. The window is one which hinges at its side and opens outwards but I think some of the wooden surrounding framework may have rotted so it may be that the frame and the glass both need replacing.  There are several things that need doing to this house but I can only afford to have them done periodically i.e. one job at a time.  Last night and again this morning we have had some rain here and I noticed some spots of water on the draining board.  Not much but looks like there is a leak on the flat roof extension (the originally very small kitchen of this 1930s house was extended in the 1970s).  I had a leak in that roof fixed about 3 or 4 years ago - if it is a small leak it could be that I could get up on the flat roof (I hate heights but this is the roof of a ground floor extension) and paint it myself though I would have to wait for a dry day again.  When contemplating do-it-yourself one has to be sensible and realise when it is something an average person like myself can do and when it is better to call on a professional.

Paul I hope you and your wife enjoyed the concert even if the main singer performed less than you had hoped.

Completely off-topic I noticed by chance on YouTube (where the algorithm still sometimes suggests things which are not to my taste) that a couple of the channels whose main content is saying that famous people are transgender have been closed down.  I wonder if someone threatened a law suit.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 29 Jul 2018, 22:46

Lady,

"The window is one which hinges at its side and opens outwards but I think some of the wooden surrounding framework may have rotted so it may be that the frame and the glass both need replacing."

Windows that open outwards...never seen up to now...perhaps the old Brit MM can explain it...and if he have seen that in France too...
The only thing we have overhere are "vensterluiken" (in Dutch, in dialect we call it: blafeturen, fentenelen, blinden, luiken) it seems to be in English "shutters"
https://www.google.be/search?q=vensterluiken&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwifjoPYk8XcAhVBdhoKHV0IDnIQsAR6BAgGEAE&biw=1261&bih=697


But anyway...can you detach the window from the hinges? Or are it hinges with screws?


Anyway can you together with a second person bring the window inside?
Of course I would better see it...but can you nail outside of the rotten parts a second frame on the window? With strips of wood
https://www.gamma.be/nl/assortiment/lat-geschaafd-vuren-7x55-mm-210-cm/p/B499390

Fill then the rotten places, after having removed the rotten wood, with putty and above the putty again some wooden profile, that you fabricate yourself from old profiles or waste wood...let harden...oops and forgot look to bring the frame of the old window as much as possible again in an angle of 90° before you start...put then the glass in it as commented before without nails...the glass will, once placed, give extra strength to the window and keep it in a 90° angle...hang the window again in its hinges...
Not sure lady, if you have a handy mate, which can experiment that all together with you...


And for the roof...I guess if you go to an old-fashioned hardware shop as MM says they will help you with the right material...there seems to exist now some kind of rubber roof plasters that you stick with a special glue...ask your local retailer...and don't be afraid...I started years ago just as you...

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 30 Jul 2018, 00:00

Lady,

and even more disgressing...
I wanted to start a rant about in my opinion English? British, anti smell sprays in the poo...
My lady bought at a given moment an anti smell spray that we weren't used to...for my scent perception it was a typical English scent that I didn't like...and I can't say why...some perception of the scent of a bar with ladies in?...not sure if it was in England...
and above my dislike also the expensive price...10 Euro for this spray of 55 ML...


But not typical English I see now...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_Wick
And now even:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reckitt_Benckiser

But against my favourite scent of the German based multinational Aldi and it does the same work in the poo in my opinion for a much lesser price and above all I like the scent...
https://nl.aldi.be/aldi_luchtverfrisser_2_pack_48_5_3145_34208.html
4 Euro for 500ML

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 30 Jul 2018, 07:07

@PaulRyckier wrote:
Windows that open outwards...never seen up to now...perhaps the old Brit MM can explain it...and if he have seen that in France too...

Ah Paul ... it's just another oddity which distinguishes the UK from the rest of Europe. In Britain I've noticed that hinged windows mostly open outwards, while in France, Belgium, Holland, Spain, Italy etc. they open inwards. I've put this down to the widespread continental use of shutters (and also sometimes fly screens) on windows: the window itself opens in while the exterior shutter opens out, so in the heat of the day or at night you can close the shutter against the light/heat yet still have the window open for some air. Conversely the UK practice of windows opening outwards means you can close the curtains with the window open. Furthermore in Britain you can have items on the window-sill and furniture directly in front of the window, which are both difficult to do when you need space to open the window inwards or access to reach right out of the window to fold the shutter completely back. External shutters are of course virtually unknown in Britain, while permanently closed inner net curtains, for privacy and to allow one to observe the neighbours while not being seen to be doing so, used to be de rigeur amongst aspiring middle-class households in my parents' day - again a practice difficult to manage if one's windows open inwards.

Another similar difference is the UK habit of putting the bathroom sink directly in front of a window which means you can't have a mirror in front of you when washing, shaving, or doing make-up. Likewise British kitchen sinks are often placed directly in front of a window, which means the window-sill gets used as a place to put the detergent bottle and other cleaning products. This isn't in itself a problem because in Britain the window opens outwards, but it does mean the bottles and scrubbing brush etc are clearly visible to the outside world - quelle horreur, especially if one has snobbish pretensions - as well as all the inevitable splashes on the window pane from washing dishes or preparing food.

But to be fair I've only really become aware of these differences in domestic arrangements between Britain, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Spain and Italy, and I don't know whether the rest of mainland Europe conforms to the British, or to the French model (though I suspect Europe generally doesn't follow the British practice).

@PaulRyckier wrote:
...perhaps the old Brit MM can explain it ...

Steady on Paul, I'm not yet even sixty! Wink
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 30 Jul 2018, 10:48

Ha ha, you are much younger than me, MM.  Paul, I don't think the British would make a spray to cover stink with the name "Poo".  I went out with some friends yesterday and wore high heels for the first time in ages and they don't really agree with me and I jarred one of my knees so it's been achy though I am now a little improved albeit still taking some painkillers.  Maybe you don't really need to know that but I won't be fixing any windows today feeling how I do; in fact I'm not going to the sign language class today but I can still call into a hardware shop next time I go into town.

I've noticed that in the UK in Victorian or Edwardian houses the windows tend to be sash windows - sliding up or down - unless the original windows have been replaced by more modern ones, of course.

I'm something of a procrastinator though when I get into a job (providing its within my capabilities) I can usually finish it.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 31 Jul 2018, 08:37

MM, we have a window in front of our sink which is common in New Zealand.  Mine just at the moment has two small vases on it, though often it has a larger one with flowers in it (at the moment only jonquils are flowering, though I see a couple of daffodils and our Early Cheer rhododendron is coming into flower, just as we are getting frosts).

But where to put our dish-washing liquid is a problem.  I am pretty sure most NZers just leave it on the bench or have a handy shelf for it, but my husband, born in the UK and brought up by British parents, told me it was "common" to do that and insists I put it away in the cupboard below. As an aside the word "common" isn't in, ah, common use in NZ, at least not in that sense, and I think that it only has snobbish undertones for what in Britain might be called lower middle class (in NZ we would consider it working class, if we were to phrase it in class terms, which is not really a usual concept).  

My husband was a secondary teacher, who attained the rank of Deputy Principal but who hasn't quite shaken off the feeling that he comes from working class stock, though personally I think his father was something of an entrepreneur, working as he did on Frank Whittle's jet plane and later in a variety of roles - carpenter, house owner and renovator, electrical fitter, restaurant owner, fish 'n' chip shop owner.  He flew all over the country in the days when my family, farmers, never left their province.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 31 Jul 2018, 18:15

Of all the things I have agonised over during my time on this earth, where to put the washing-up liquid has never really been a problem. I always buy Fairy Liquid Pomegranate and Honeysuckle flavour because it is a lovely rich red colour which looks nice against my white sink. The choice of this brightly coloured detergent and its prominent position in my kitchen is  probably horribly revealing about my class origins and aspirations - but I don't care.




I bet the old-fashioned white plastic Fairy Liquid bottles - with the baby motif - are much sought after now, and having one on one's window sill would be an indication of one's uber-trendiness (not sure if you can get the old bottles anywhere now - probably being flogged on ebay for about £25).




PS LiR - do get a glazier to do your window etc. - shouldn't be too expensive. Messing about with glass and going on roofs is a bit dodgy if you don't really know what you're doing. I wouldn't attempt it!
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 01 Aug 2018, 00:05

@Meles meles wrote:
@PaulRyckier wrote:
Windows that open outwards...never seen up to now...perhaps the old Brit MM can explain it...and if he have seen that in France too...

Ah Paul ... it's just another oddity which distinguishes the UK from the rest of Europe. In Britain I've noticed that hinged windows mostly open outwards, while in France, Belgium, Holland, Spain, Italy etc. they open inwards. I've put this down to the widespread continental use of shutters (and also sometimes fly screens) on windows: the window itself opens in while the exterior shutter opens out, so in the heat of the day or at night you can close the shutter against the light/heat yet still have the window open for some air. Conversely the UK practice of windows opening outwards means you can close the curtains with the window open. Furthermore in Britain you can have items on the window-sill and furniture directly in front of the window, which are both difficult to do when you need space to open the window inwards or access to reach right out of the window to fold the shutter completely back. External shutters are of course virtually unknown in Britain, while permanently closed inner net curtains, for privacy and to allow one to observe the neighbours while not being seen to be doing so, used to be de rigeur amongst aspiring middle-class households in my parents' day - again a practice difficult to manage if one's windows open inwards.

Another similar difference is the UK habit of putting the bathroom sink directly in front of a window which means you can't have a mirror in front of you when washing, shaving, or doing make-up. Likewise British kitchen sinks are often placed directly in front of a window, which means the window-sill gets used as a place to put the detergent bottle and other cleaning products. This isn't in itself a problem because in Britain the window opens outwards, but it does mean the bottles and scrubbing brush etc are clearly visible to the outside world - quelle horreur, especially if one has snobbish pretensions - as well as all the inevitable splashes on the window pane from washing dishes or preparing food.

But to be fair I've only really become aware of these differences in domestic arrangements between Britain, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Spain and Italy, and I don't know whether the rest of mainland Europe conforms to the British, or to the French model (though I suspect Europe generally doesn't follow the British practice).

@PaulRyckier wrote:
...perhaps the old Brit MM can explain it ...

Steady on Paul, I'm not yet even sixty! Wink


Meles meles,

thanks for the detailed explanation...and yes both customs have their advantages...
But I think to work at a window, as in LiR's case is a disadvantage for the windows turning outside...if it is for instance on the second floor...(I have always difficulties with that I hope it is then the third level starting from the ground? As it is considered overhere, the first level being the groundfloor)

"Furthermore in Britain you can have items on the window-sill and furniture directly in front of the window, which are both difficult to do when you need space to open the window inwards or access to reach right out of the window to fold the shutter completely back. External shutters are of course virtually unknown in Britain, while permanently closed inner net curtains, for privacy and to allow one to observe the neighbours while not being seen to be doing so, used to be de rigeur amongst aspiring middle-class households in my parents' day - again a practice difficult to manage if one's windows open inwards."

Yes when opening the window inwards it is difficult with all "things" on the window-sill, but there excist devices in the "sponning" that you can clap open and click on the window to fix it at for instance an opening width of six inches (about 15 cm)

"while permanently closed inner net curtains, for privacy and to allow one to observe the neighbours while not being seen to be doing so, used to be de rigeur amongst aspiring middle-class households in my parents' day - again a practice difficult to manage if one's windows open inwards."

MM you forget the little spion mirrors...I didn't find an old fashioned one on internet anymore, but I saw them in the time in Ostend, Ghent, Brussels...
https://www.koffieverzameling.nl/-spionnetjes-spion-/


But overhere at least we have two kinds of curtains: the thin transparant "voile" curtains (voile gordijnen) and (overgordijnen, draperiën) over curtains? thick non transparant ones, normally thicker than the ones on the photo...and with the windows closed and the voile curtains closed, one observer can look through the curtains from the dark from inside in the little spion and look to the events in the street...for instance an odd lady passing by...and giving comments to the second observer inside...

"Another similar difference is the UK habit of putting the bathroom sink directly in front of a window which means you can't have a mirror in front of you when washing, shaving, or doing make-up"

Yes that's a big difference with overhere...mostly bathrooms are fully closed with a ventilator evacuation, or when outside a small window above which can open for air evacuation, or as in our case with a flat roof a "lichtkoepel"(a plastic transparant coupole?)...

"Likewise British kitchen sinks are often placed directly in front of a window, which means the window-sill gets used as a place to put the detergent bottle and other cleaning products. This isn't in itself a problem because in Britain the window opens outwards, but it does mean the bottles and scrubbing brush etc are clearly visible to the outside world - quelle horreur, especially if one has snobbish pretensions - as well as all the inevitable splashes on the window pane from washing dishes or preparing food."

Overhere the bigger kitchens have a smaller in height window that let some 40 cm (16 inches?) wall above the sink and with smaller kitchen a normal window, mostly at the right side I don't know why, and also closed with a voile curtain or a plastic lamels device, which let the light in from above or when horizontal transparant from outside...

"...perhaps the old Brit MM can explain it ..."

yes Meles meles that is the difficulty with foreign languages especially when one is in a hurry...of course I didn't mean old in the sense of age; but I couldn't say the former Brit MM "bien élevé en Grande Bretagne", while he is still a subject of her majesty the Queen (un sujet de sa majesté la Reine) ("sa" parce que "majesté" est féminin), but I wanted to say that he has adopted now a bit the new nationality of la douce France...
And to point again to the difficulty of foreign languages, I am not sure if you can translate "bien élevé en Grande Bretagne" by "well elevated in Great Britain"?

PS: excuses to everybody to not have been on the board yesterday, while having a copious dinner in a restaurant, well known for its quality meat...five persons...three and a half hours...big quantities of excellent red meat (saignant presque bleu)... and half a lobster to start with...as said big quantities...the rest we (my wife and I) have received in aluminium folium and this evening a full meal again of that (have to agree second bake Embarassed ) quality meat...hope animal liberation front will not raid the restaurant...

PPS: leave the board for some days...to Zurich...visiting the granddaughter...not sure if my absence will be that noticed as before, because seemingly there is a sudden revival of the board, even our Dirk and Islandawn back...and I had just something for Islanddawn...and Triceratops and Gilgamesh and Ferval...

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 01 Aug 2018, 07:51

The biggest disadvantage of the British system of outward opening windows must however be that unless they are on the ground floor it is virtually impossible to safely clean the outside of the glass. Hence I suppose why when I was young the 'window-cleaner' with his long ladder (always padded at the top end) was just another regular tradesman servicing a round of customers and collecting his money at a weekend or at the end of the month. And he was all the more in demand then because domestic coal fires were still common and strict clean air legislation had yet to be introduced. But given that Britain had been long dependent on coal for domestic heating, electricity generation and general industry, why I wonder did the impossible-to-clean outward opening window become the standard?
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 01 Aug 2018, 14:29

The window that has cracked is on the ground floor but because the house is on a hill it is lower inside the house than outside.  When cleaning outside windows I use a squee-gee sort of mop with a long handle though sometimes I do have to stand on a ladder.  As I said I'm a bit under the weather with tonsillitis and a sore mouth (I think a couple of my teeth may need extraction) and at present am wondering whether to go to Spanish class tomorrow in case the sore throat is contagious.

I'm certainly not going to do anything to any window today (unless it was an emergency and had to put a temporary covering over a window) but when cleaning windows I have used diluted washing up liquid to clean them.  White vinegar is sometimes suggested - wiped down with newsprint but unless it is the free newsletters - that seem to have been cut down in my area - I haven't bought a real (i.e. not online) newspaper for a long time.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 02 Aug 2018, 11:43

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
the expression "fake news"

I thought that I was seeing an example of fake news this morning when the BBC weather reporter claimed to be reporting from Greenwich Park. The scene behind looked more like a view of Los Angeles or Johannesburg or some such place. But then I realised that those were indeed the skyscrapers of the City of London in the background. The colour of the parched grass on the sloping lawns beside the Royal Observatory, however, was more than just light brown as to be almost white.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 03 Aug 2018, 02:09

MM, my son and dil, when living in Sheffield till 2014, had that system for cleaning their windows.  I remember being left in charge of payment once, when he was due to be paid.  And frequently seeing him there on the outside of the window while I was playing on the computer.  I think he came once a month or once a fortnight.  Regularly anyway.  Now my husband is objecting to paying $70 (roughly 35 pounds) to have a very efficient window-cleaner come and do all our windows inside and out, since it only takes her about an hour, and he thinks that is too much for an hour's work which he could do himself.  I am sure it would take much longer for him to do it.  

We have, as most NZers do, a single storey home.Detached with quite a large (nearly 1/4 acre) garden.  As do many people in the tiny town I live in.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 03 Aug 2018, 07:27

I'm sorry, but I think the audience here is grown enough for this oldie

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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 04 Aug 2018, 08:53

Nielsen, if we get overly serious, you know how to put a smile on our faces (maybe I shouldn't speak for other people but on my face at least).  I don't know how things are in Denmark but there are still window cleaners in the UK but not as many as there used to be so they tend to get booked up (for work) very quickly.    I'm not really familiar with the Danish sense of humour but I did quite like the late Victor Borge back in the day.  The Danish actor Nicolaj Coster-Woldau was in a comedy film but it didn't do very well at the box office.  I'm really only familiar with him as Jaime in Game of Thrones though I think he was also in The Killing and maybe The Bridge but I'm not 100% sure.  He is sometimes witty in interviews.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 06 Aug 2018, 15:54

This should be on the technical thread but everything is going slow on the site for me at  present.  This morning I couldn't get on the site and sent an off-list message to nordmann about the fact.  Well, as folk will see, I was able to get on the site this afternoon but it was going (still is) very slowly.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 07 Aug 2018, 04:26

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
Nielsen, if we get overly serious, you know how to put a smile on our faces (maybe I shouldn't speak for other people but on my face at least).  I don't know how things are in Denmark but there are still window cleaners in the UK but not as many as there used to be so they tend to get booked up (for work) very quickly.    I'm not really familiar with the Danish sense of humour but I did quite like the late Victor Borge back in the day.  The Danish actor Nicolaj Coster-Woldau was in a comedy film but it didn't do very well at the box office.  I'm really only familiar with him as Jaime in Game of Thrones though I think he was also in The Killing and maybe The Bridge but I'm not 100% sure.  He is sometimes witty in interviews.

Merci du compliment, LiR, and that stretches my French.

Regarding window cleaners, there are some around here, also in semi rural areas like where I live, and I do regularly employ one.

As to comedians in present days Denmark I can only say that I'm not really au courant with that breed, as what little I've seen and heard, at least in this millenium, makes me somewhat sad, apparently to be considered a comedian nowadays you mostly need a foul and insulting mouth more than a brain. Previously you had to say something in such a way that the censorship let it through, as the audience had to think themselves, deteriation I think this is called.*)

I can't really comment on Nicolai Coster-Waldau as I'm not aware of having seen him, neither have I seen either of the series you mention, so I have no opinions to offer on them.

*) As an addendum an example of one of the old fashioned mono-/dialogues that wasn't censored in this country:
In the background, a line waiting for the bus with a youngish woman in a tight dress and a man behind her, both to the front, those behind drawn.
The bus arrives, the woman attempts the steps but her dress is too tight.
Discreetly she tries to losen the dress by pulling the zipper in the back down. 
A first attempt isn't enough, she tries again, and then a third time to no awail.

Suddenly she feels a hand on her behind, and she jumps up in the bus, turning to face the man behind her, she asks,
"How dare you, Sir?"
"Well, as we stood there you did pull my zipper down three times, so I thought you wanted to get acquainted."



Edited because of adding the addendum.


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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 07 Aug 2018, 12:24

I spent a bit of time on YouTube this morning (it is quite useful for tips about sewing etc and for getting ideas about glitches on the computer and even about gluten free recipes) and something popped into my recommendation box about one Mr Alex Jones.  For those who are not in the know Mr Jones is a very right-wing American "alternative" newsperson though he sometimes appears to verge on being a conspiracy theorist.  A lot of his content is loopy - there may be the odd nugget of truth here and there but I think what he says is best taken with an extremely large grain of salt.  Where he seems to have come unstuck is that he alleged that shootings such as the Sandy Hook event where schoolchildren were shot dead were faked and that the grieving parents were "crisis actors".   Some of his followers took him at face value and threatened some of the parents and one lady was jailed for making threats.  Some of the parents have now taken out civil cases against him (he's counter-suing though I don't really see how he can win).  Long story short a number of social media sites including YouTube have terminated his channels/pages at the same time but there are people on YouTube saying that the first amendment has been breached blah-de-blah-se-blah.  I must admit that I don't know a great deal about American internet law though I believe the same laws apply to the internet for defamation as for broadcasting and printed media.  I don't think the first amendment gives citizens of the USA carte-blanche to spread lies and disinformation though.  I know there is the statement (in the version I heard it was ascribed to Winston Churchill though I'm not sure if my source is correct) [paraphrasing] "I disagree with you utterly but I support your right to say it" but to me at least it seems that there should be a line, a fine line admittedly, dividing what it is okay to say and what it isn't.  Calling grieving parents crisis actors is taking it too far I think, but that's just me.

I sometimes find Katie Hopkins amusing (don't necessarily agree with her) but she took it a bit too far when she made tweets (wrongly) about a food writer accusing the writer of having defaced war memorials (Ms Hopkins said it was a case of mistaken identity and later deleted the tweets).  The writer successfully sued Ms Hopkins; I will give Ms Hopkins the benefit of the doubt that she made a genuine mistake but in this case that didn't help her and she was denied leave to appeal. *[url=https://www.independent.co.uk %E2%80%BA News %E2%80%BA UK %E2%80%BA Home News]https://www.independent.co.uk › News › UK › Home News[/url]
Of course UK law and USA law are different; we don't have a written right to freedom of speech in the UK though as MM pointed out in the "Very English Scandal" thread there are ways of making a point as Auberon Waugh did when writing in Private Eye when he was standing for the Dog Lovers' Party.

* I don't know what is wrong with my copy facility today but when I tested the link I got today's page with Mrs May and nothing about Ms Hopkins so maybe do an internet search using whichever is your preferred search engine on "Katie Hopkins sued" - if you can be a***d, the subject may not be of interest to you.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 07 Aug 2018, 19:13

The sound quality is not brilliant but after my holding forth about Alex Jones here is something lighter - a sketch from Not the Nine O'Clock News in the 1980s where Rowan Atkinson plays an alien warning the world about things that may happen (only his translation machine keeps going wrong).  
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 07 Aug 2018, 20:04

Not sure where to put this but Paul had linked some songs in the French/Germanic border thread.  This singer (Yma Sumac) was Peruvian (she certainly had an exceptional vocal range).  I haven't heard many singers who could get so high with apparently little effort - possibly Mariah Carey but she's a bit poptastic (maybe what Ms Carey sings doesn't appeal to me).  I suppose Yma Sumac sounds unusual by today's standards but she had an incredible voice.  


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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 09 Aug 2018, 12:08

In UK news we are being bombarded with news about Boris Johnson's recent politically incorrect opinion that Muslim ladies having the right to wear the burkah but that he thought it looked like a letterbox or a bank robber outfit.  He went too far of course and BJ is far too right-wing for me (don't want him as Prime Minister), but he does make me laugh sometimes.  It's possible that he was deliberately being contentious with the opinion he expressed.  I think the media are making a mountain out of molehill about it though.

I mentioned something upthread yesterday about Katie Hopkins running her mouth off (well that's not strictly speaking true - she ran her Twitter account off) and receiving a fine after a lawsuit.  Back in May she was in Belgium being controversial https://youtu.be/6389nKQ5iW8  Now I must admit I don't know how this eventually played out but I'm linking another YouTube video about Ms Hopkins being allegedly sued by the Mayor of Molenbeek (sp?) - it's "Rebel Media" which is very, very right-wing so take it with a liberal pinch of salt but Ms Hopkins appears to be asking for help in funding yet another court case?  


Edit: The director to take the information about the item on the right-wing media outlet with a "liberal" pinch of salt was accidental.









As I say, I'm not sure how this played out or whether it is still ongoing.

BTW, I didn't notice Nielsen's joke about the zip yesterday (I'm still a bit out of sorts this week) but I have noticed it now - thank you, Nielsen for a bit of levity.


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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 09 Aug 2018, 20:38

Lady in Retirement,

In your posting of Tuesday 7th August you do mention freedom of speech and at present there is a lot of ado about Boris Johnson and his utterance about the burka but many people get confused with the term 'free speech'.

 To me, it means that I can be publicly critical of governments, policies. laws and so on. As an example  I can say what a mess the First Group has made of the former South West Trains' franchise.
It doesn't mean I am free to slander people. make false accusations or deliberately seek to offend people. I can't stand up in the market square and state that so-and-so is a paedophile (if he isn't) and then claim my right to free speech.

As for Boris - what's wrong with stating his opinion? He's a buffoon and I just roll my eyes when I hear his latest comment. The Duke of Edinburgh has made many, many unwise comments.
I've not heard calls that he should be locked in the Tower.

https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/prince-philip-best-gaffes-quotes-133848



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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 09 Aug 2018, 22:26

Dirk and LiR, wanted to comment on Yma Sumac and many other things, but again my backlog is not decreased while the whole evening on a French board about our Charles Quint from Ghent (Carlos I in Spain). Excuses...

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 10 Aug 2018, 11:34

Dirk was more alert than I yesterday in observing that my post about Alex Jones was on Tuesday of this week - I had said "yesterday" on Thursday - on which day of course "yesterday" would have been Wednesday.

To more mundane things my fridge is on its last legs - the ice box isn't freezing up and a couple of times I've had milk curdle in the fridge (mind you the weather had been very hot; not so much today it's cooler).  I may make enquiries to see if there are any suitable secondhand ones before I fork out for a really expensive one.  My typing load has suddenly increased so less time to spend on the internet (though I should limit my time on the internet voluntarily but as the song In my Liverpool Home goes "the spirit is willing but the flesh it is weak").
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 11 Aug 2018, 15:34

I'm going to try and be quick now - I'm actually procrastinating from real world activity because I have some horrible typing to do but I can't procrastinate too long because I have a turnaround time for the typing.  Anyway, as I said recently, if I go on to YouTube I still get some odd channels coming into my recommendations.  As well as the all public figures are transgender ones there are some saying that certain public figures were "played" by the same person.  I do hope these are parody channels - somebody called Hollywood Hoodwinked is saying that Freddie Mercury and Christopher Reeve were the same person despite their heights and ethnicities being different.  I hope that the intelligence of the human race has not really got so low and that it's just someone trying for Clickbait.

Of course, there are naturally people who look alike - my late mother had something of a look of Katherine Hepburn about her though she was younger than KH.  Maybe there were times Mum would have rather been living the high life in Hollywood rather than teaching in the UK at the same time as cooking and cleaning for a husband and family!!  The Mirror newspaper used to (well it may still do) a "separated at birth" feature where they would jokingly refer to some celebrities where there was an apparent likeness - nobody took it seriously though, we all knew it was for giggles.  An example from a few years ago [url=https://www.mirror.co.uk %E2%80%BA 3am %E2%80%BA Celebrity News]https://www.mirror.co.uk › 3am › Celebrity News[/url]  I referred sometime ago to the fictional "Lobby Lud" character in a newspaper in the past - and the fact that sometimes when a person said to a supposed "Lobby Lud" - "You are Lobby Lud and I claim £5" things could get frenetic when a hapless member of the public tried to explain that they were NOT Mr Lud!  An article about Lobby Lud (it's long....) from planets lade www.planetslade.com/lobby-lud.html and a shorter feature from Wikipedia 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobby_Lud  If anybody trawls through the long article they will see that one lady won the prize when it had accumulated to £100 - at that time she was able to buy new clothes for her family and buy coal for the winter (coal fires still being prevalent then) and still have something left over to put in the bank and have a holiday.  How times change.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 11 Aug 2018, 22:41

... Christopher Reeve and Freddie Mercury the same person? ... That's ridiculous!
Surely every tin-foil-hatted conspiracist already knows that Freddie Mercury was really Lord Lucan:

   
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 11 Aug 2018, 23:05

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
Dirk was more alert than I yesterday in observing that my post about Alex Jones was on Tuesday of this week - I had said "yesterday" on Thursday - on which day of course "yesterday" would have been Wednesday.

To more mundane things my fridge is on its last legs - the ice box isn't freezing up and a couple of times I've had milk curdle in the fridge (mind you the weather had been very hot; not so much today it's cooler).  I may make enquiries to see if there are any suitable secondhand ones before I fork out for a really expensive one.  My typing load has suddenly increased so less time to spend on the internet (though I should limit my time on the internet voluntarily but as the song In my Liverpool Home goes "the spirit is willing but the flesh it is weak").

 Lady,

excuses the whole night busy with the two brothers on a French forum: Our Charles V from Ghent (Carlos I in Spain) and his brother Ferdinand I of the HRE
http://passion-histoire.net/viewtopic.php?f=53&t=40905

"but as the song In my Liverpool Home goes "the spirit is willing but the flesh it is weak"
Tut, tut, tut "song"
Matheus I found out...Mattheus 26:40-41
https://www.statenvertaling.net/uitdrukkingen.html
"de geest is gewillig maar het vlees zwak: gebruikt in Mattheüs 26:40-41, En Hij kwam tot de discipelen en vond hen slapende, en zeide tot Petrus: Kunt gij dan niet een uur met Mij waken? Waakt en bidt, opdat gij niet in verzoeking komt; de geest is wel gewillig, maar het vlees is zwak. In zijn laatste nacht vraagt Jezus zijn volgelingen wakker te blijven, maar zij kunnen de verleiding van de slaap niet weerstaan.
Betekenis: van goede wil zijn maar verleidingen niet kunnen weerstaan.

And it comes from the Dutch Statenbijbel, thus it has to be believed...

And my mother said it came from Paul. Of course not me, but the Holy apostle Paulus...
And thanks to you now my belief is changed from Paulus to Mattheus...

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 12 Aug 2018, 10:09

I'm going to post a link to a clip of In My Liverpool Home.  I don't know much about the origin of the song but Wikipedia said it was written by a Liverpudlian man - his name was Peter McGovern and he worked on the railway for a long time but found time to be an activist and a songwriter.  The bit about the flesh being weak is at about 1:29.  The words are on the screen but at one point the screen shows a "by" where there should be a "my".  The clip describes the singers as being the group The Scaffold whereas in fact they are a folk singing group The Spinners.  Some trivia: the "statue exceedingly bare" is a statue of a naked man outside the Liverpool shop Lewis's (wasn't that chain closed down some years ago?).  The statue was by Jacob Epstein and called "Liverpool Resurgent" but the locals (says Wikipedia) call it Nobby Lewis or Dickie Lewis.  Another bit of trivia, one member of the Scaffold was known professionally as Mike McGear but is actually the younger brother of Paul McCartney but used a different name to avoid comparison with his famous older brother, Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 13 Aug 2018, 16:25

Well interesting to read Dirk's and Paul's contributions from yesterday on other threads though I haven't anything to add there at present.  Freddie Mercury and the late Lord Lucan are somewhat alike MM, you are right.  Well no luck at the hospice warehouse re: secondhand fridges - they sell them if they have them in stock but at present they don't.  Back in the 1990s I seem to remember Iceland (the shop not the country) selling white goods but no luck there today so seems the shop no longer does that.  I picked up an Argos catalogue and will have a decko.  For now I must rest a little because I  had a nightmare last night (though can't remember it now) and didn't sleep very well.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 13 Aug 2018, 23:28

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
Well interesting to read Dirk's and Paul's contributions from yesterday on other threads though I haven't anything to add there at present.  Freddie Mercury and the late Lord Lucan are somewhat alike MM, you are right.  Well no luck at the hospice warehouse re: secondhand fridges - they sell them if they have them in stock but at present they don't.  Back in the 1990s I seem to remember Iceland (the shop not the country) selling white goods but no luck there today so seems the shop no longer does that.  I picked up an Argos catalogue and will have a decko.  For now I must rest a little because I  had a nightmare last night (though can't remember it now) and didn't sleep very well.

Lady,

found this after one hour seeking, got nearly crazy...in English it seems to have be: under counter (we say "table model") combi fridge (with freezer box)
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Beko-UR584APW-Undercounter-White-combi-fridge/dp/B008MLYZ5A/ref=br_lf_m_rovrgksuscoq39o_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&s=kitchen
In Belgium they seem a bit cheaper

Hope you sleep this night better

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 13 Aug 2018, 23:43

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
I'm going to post a link to a clip of In My Liverpool Home.  I don't know much about the origin of the song but Wikipedia said it was written by a Liverpudlian man - his name was Peter McGovern and he worked on the railway for a long time but found time to be an activist and a songwriter.  The bit about the flesh being weak is at about 1:29.  The words are on the screen but at one point the screen shows a "by" where there should be a "my".  The clip describes the singers as being the group The Scaffold whereas in fact they are a folk singing group The Spinners.  Some trivia: the "statue exceedingly bare" is a statue of a naked man outside the Liverpool shop Lewis's (wasn't that chain closed down some years ago?).  The statue was by Jacob Epstein and called "Liverpool Resurgent" but the locals (says Wikipedia) call it Nobby Lewis or Dickie Lewis.  Another bit of trivia, one member of the Scaffold was known professionally as Mike McGear but is actually the younger brother of Paul McCartney but used a different name to avoid comparison with his famous older brother, Paul.
 Lady,

thanks for the song and I understand that dialect loud and clear, perhaps better than the "normal" spoken English...

"the "statue exceedingly bare" is a statue of a naked man outside the Liverpool shop Lewis's (wasn't that chain closed down some years ago?).  The statue was by Jacob Epstein and called "Liverpool Resurgent" but the locals (says Wikipedia) call it Nobby Lewis or Dickie Lewis. "


It is from George Grard
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Grard


And it is called "la mer"...the guy wanted to evocate by that lady the "feeling" of the sea...hmm...
But the locals from Ostend call it "dikke Matille" (thick Mathilda)...
https://www.visitoostende.be/nl/dikke-mathille

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 14 Aug 2018, 15:41

Ha, ha, you can rely on the local inhabitants of a place to come up with an appropriate name for a statue or a building or whatever......

I borrowed some books from the town lending library yesterday but quite forgot to look for non-fiction books about Charlemagne and his legacy.  I borrowed some mystery novels.  Somebody (was it MM?) mentioned Lindsay Davies' (Davies's ?) books about Falco (as in her fictional ancient Roman character - not as in the 1980s pop singer of "Rock Me Amadeus" fame) a while back.  I'm reading a book about Falco's (Ms Davies' Falco) adopted daughter - she mentions Cicero's brother's advice regarding winning an election.  Of course I had to look it up and it would appear Ms Davies was correct regarding the advice Cicero Minor gave to an election hopeful.  Things haven't changed much in the last 2,000 and something years - politicians still make and break promises. https://fs.blog/2012/03/5-things-cicero-can-teach-you-about-winning-an-election/   “Remember Cotta, that master of campaigning, who said he would promise anything, unless some clear obligation prevented him, but only lived up to those promises that benefited him.”
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 15 Aug 2018, 11:28

I have been using this thread for my sundry thoughts of late.  I don't know if clearing the 'history' on my computer always works 100% because a video popped up (I think) averring that Kylie Minogue was born a boy...well, I don't have to watch the nutty videos but I thought I'd cleared out my cache so I didn't get them recommended anymore! When I did watch the nutty videos I think the premise put forward was that somebody could not join "the elite" unless they had switched gender.  We all know that the world is unfair, some people have a disproportionate amount of money compared to the poor dogs underneath.  I'm never quite sure who "the elites" are supposed to be...okay, very wealthy people, are they the "upper" classes, the aristocracy etc.  There has always been some fluidity about who has riches (it's not  impossible for somebody from a working class background to make it as a pop singer, say)...okay, mostly the people who have the boodle hang on to the boodle, but as he whom nordmann entitled Mr Wobbleweapon once stated "Uneasy lies the head that wears the crown".  On this board we have discussed the death of William Rufus in a hunting accident (or not?) and I wouldn't say things ended up well for the various French aristocrats who were killed on the guillotine at the time of the French revolution (I suppose they would have counted as "elites"?).  Wenceslas, Duke of Bohemia (in the UK we've promoted him to king in the Christmas carol) was an aristocrat but still met an untimely death.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wenceslaus_I,_Duke_of_Bohemia  Still, I know I'm mentioning things to people who believe in facts on this website.  It does seem that there are some positives to not having something another person might envy (like a title or lands).
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 15 Aug 2018, 21:39

Lady to both your last messages...

I wanted today start a reply to the "social" thinking of Georges Orwell on that thread and also something about "elites" both political and financial...and something on the Brexit thread about the history of trade wars with social consequences...not that much changed since the three Anglo-Dutch trade wars...
And yesterday about your: nothing changed that much in 2000 years concerning human behaviour

Lets start with the human behaviour...
I suppose that a mere 2000 years on the 9000 of organized human structures, I suppose triggered by the agricultural revolution, are a very short period in genetic human evolution. Lets say that the state structures started about 5000 years ago and than there was an ever increasing better and more sophisticated technology, science and communication environment. But as we discussed in the nature versus nurture thread, the by the genetics triggered human behaviour don't evolve that quick as the behaviour triggered by the environment.
And I still think Desmond Morris had at least "some" hints to our old genetic behaviour...perhaps we need here the input from nordmann...
https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/sep/24/the-naked-ape-at-50-desmond-morris-four-experts-assess-impact
I remember lol beeble on the old BBC historyboard that he had only to look to the time of 2000 years ago to understand how present day situation evolve...I don't fully agree with him, as some 2000 years of history learning has perhaps changed a bit the response of the genetic human behaviour to incoming situations...but I am not sure...propaganda by the rulers of these earlier times has still nowadays a huge impact, I presume...
And yes how higher on the elite ladder (tiens Dutch: ladder) how deeper one can fall...even murdered by the earlier followers...

The rest I want to add to the Brexit thread...

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Yesterday at 11:31

I came across something on Wikipedia about a book which was published in 1956 and was written by a sociologist, C Wright Mills entitled The Power Elite.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Power_Elite which focuses on the interweaving of the interests of those in pivotal positions in the corporate, military and political areas.  I haven't read the book and imagine that some of what the writer says boils down to common sense. I have sometimes listened to some alternative media because we maybe don't get the whole story always from the mainstream media but have come to the conclusion that some alternative media streams (not necessarily all of them) are just speculation and more outlandish than mainstream media.  Where the notion of the corporate, the military and the political spheres having intertwined interests evolved into the idea of the rich and powerful offering human sacrifice to a Baphomet goat god I haven't the faintest idea.  I know sacrificing to the Baphomet goat god was something the Templars were accused of by Philippe Le Bel of France (they confessed under torture and Philippe wanted the Templars' money I think).  I'm not saying there couldn't be some people with more money than sense getting involved with bizarre cults and it is acknowledged that in the not so distant past children/teenagers from Orphanages and runaways were exploited (thinking of the Jimmy Savile scandal).

Anyway, I'm trying to use YouTube (when I go there) for sensible content now.  Yesterday I was somewhat sidetracked and started watching clips from Miss Saigon.  I've never seen that musical on stage but over the years there seem to have been some Filipina singers with good voices (Lea Salonga, Rachelle Ann Go to name but two).
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Yesterday at 22:57

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
I came across something on Wikipedia about a book which was published in 1956 and was written by a sociologist, C Wright Mills entitled The Power Elite.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Power_Elite which focuses on the interweaving of the interests of those in pivotal positions in the corporate, military and political areas.  I haven't read the book and imagine that some of what the writer says boils down to common sense. I have sometimes listened to some alternative media because we maybe don't get the whole story always from the mainstream media but have come to the conclusion that some alternative media streams (not necessarily all of them) are just speculation and more outlandish than mainstream media.  Where the notion of the corporate, the military and the political spheres having intertwined interests evolved into the idea of the rich and powerful offering human sacrifice to a Baphomet goat god I haven't the faintest idea.  I know sacrificing to the Baphomet goat god was something the Templars were accused of by Philippe Le Bel of France (they confessed under torture and Philippe wanted the Templars' money I think).  I'm not saying there couldn't be some people with more money than sense getting involved with bizarre cults and it is acknowledged that in the not so distant past children/teenagers from Orphanages and runaways were exploited (thinking of the Jimmy Savile scandal).

Anyway, I'm trying to use YouTube (when I go there) for sensible content now.  Yesterday I was somewhat sidetracked and started watching clips from Miss Saigon.  I've never seen that musical on stage but over the years there seem to have been some Filipina singers with good voices (Lea Salonga, Rachelle Ann Go to name but two).

 
Lady,

one has to be cautious that one not end in the "Protocols of the elders of Zion"...that conspiracy hoax that has still adepts in the Muslim Middle East...
And it is true that a lot is decided above our heads and that the happy few (the "Plutocarats in the Nazi terminology) have a lot of money in comparison with the bulk of the average others (a few have as much as the whole rest of the population...and yes money gives power...but it is quite a common thread throughout history and  nearly normal...and as I said in my former message it is up to the citizens of the world to push their goverments to make international binding treaties and controls to avoid tax evasion and black money and to avoid damage for the "real" industry and research. Avoid as much as possible the speculation, which is mostly dangerous for the "real" economy...but as the world exist nowadays as an intertwined capitalistic world one has to be prudent to avoid unilateral measurements without coordination with other capitalistic economic big powers...The German Merkel had good intentions, but even the EU is too small without coordination with the US, Japan, China...and the US of Trump seems...

About the Protocols:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Protocols_of_the_Elders_of_Zion
https://www.amazon.com/Lie-That-Wouldnt-Die-Protocols/dp/0853035954
I read the book first in Dutch as that was the first language translated in from Hebrew...
And up to all what I searched on the net about sources mentioned in the book revealed to be true, even more than in the book was mentioned...but I don't say that the Hebrew state, as recently claimed, are all angels too...

Kind regards from Paul.
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