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 The Tumbleweed Suite

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Meles meles
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 13 Sep 2018, 20:34

LiR - I'd strongly advise you to get it seen to as quickly as possible. I had a small hole in a gutter that caused rain-water to dribble down the outside of the house - so no actualy water penetration - and yet I'm still, six months later, having to repeatedly paint over the black mould patches that regularly appear on the inside bedroom walls. The defective gutter was fixed months ago (February) but the effects of the original water penetration are still with me ... even on a south-facing wall and in the sunny south of France.
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 13 Sep 2018, 21:44

Meles Meles, you are probably right.  I've been looking at the portal about building regulations and I don't think I need permission to repair like for like.

I made a bit of a detour to the look (at Wikipedia though I know it's not perfect) at the history of copyright law.  I haven't taken it all in yet.  I mentioned something about Othello tangentially on another thread and from my admittedly rusty memory of what I learned in my schooldays, Shakespeare borrowed liberally from other sources.  In the story Othello was based on, Desdemona died much more violently I recall (not that being strangled is peaceful).
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PaulRyckier
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Thu 13 Sep 2018, 22:41

Lady,

I don't know what happened with my complete message. I have sent it or was in the preview phase just before sending. And now I see that you edited something...

In any case I start again...

"Thanks to Paul for the info about the French/German border (and other peoples' contributions).  I've bought my new fridge/freezer which will be delivered over the next few days and have contacted someone about the roof.  The bad news is  the gent can't come (i.e. about the roof) until 24th Sept as he's going on holiday tomorrow.  I've ordered some tarpaulin 4m x 10m though I think I really need a bigger sheet.  It's not coming till Monday - it's not supposed to be raining today but there's rain forecast tomorrow.  Maybe I can get some cheap and cheery plastic tablecloth stuff in the meantime (and move anything electric away from a possible leak).  It's the sort of job that would have been suitable for the hot weather in the summer but since I've had the coeliac disease I get very fatigued sometimes and forgetf"
"I'd noticed a bit of damp in the kitchen but didn't realise it was as bad.  It did cross my mind to ring the chap who fixed it a few years ago to at least get an opinion but I was not 100% healthwise and forgot.  Anyway I've found a video on YouTube that might give me an idea what to do temporarily."

Lady, "vous vous débrouillez pas mal" (you cope not that bad (with the situation)) as our MM in his Southern France...
The important thing is to not undergo the circumstances, but to actively encounter them. To take a decision is better, even if it turns otherwise than expected, than to consider you as a victim and do nothing...in my humble opinion...
And I am glad that you will have your new fridge.

"I've ordered some tarpaulin 4m x 10m"

never heard about "tarpaulin"
But now I see:


We call it in our dialect a "bâche", but that is French and I found in my dictionary: a "dekzeil" (covering sail) and in the Dutch-English indeed a "tarpaulin"
But sometimes you have to wait for a craftsman to fix your trouble...don't say it to me: 30 years in the home refurbish business...yes patience is a good virtue...I learned it in the army as a conscript and in the clinic for all the tests on my body to be sure that I was fit to receive a transplant kidney...
(and I wanted first to use "temperance" which due to my French-English from 1929 means also patience, tempérance, modération, sobriété. Yes sometimes you have to be moderated in the wake of a situation which has to be solved immediatly...we say: one can not shoe a running horse (men kan 'n paard niet al lopend beslaan).
You english speaking ones correct me if I am wrong with my explanation of "temperance"...

BTW: while thinking about temperance...where are nordmann and Temperance suddenly...again...

Kind regards from Paul.
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 14 Sep 2018, 17:25

Maybe nordmann and Temperance are on holiday.  I've taken delivery of my new fridge/freezer today (and had the old one taken away).  I'd had the old one since 1995 so if its replacement does as well as that I should be okay considering I'm in my late 60s now.  Still there was a French (I think) lady who lived to be over 120 (this might be back in the 1990s) who had sold or bequeathed (or devised?*) her house to someone for his use after her death and in the event she outlived him!

* I always get those words mixed up (in the context of leaving something in a will) - not in the idea of devising an idea.

Paul, I am linking to the Merriam-Webster definition(s) of temperate as it's a word with more than one meaning
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/temperate
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 14 Sep 2018, 22:24

Lady,

yes you seem to be right: no "patience" as in the 1929 English-French dictionary...
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/temperance
https://www.dictionary.com/browse/temperance


But yes perhaps the 1929 French dictionary meant with "patience" the restreint that one has to have at nearly "boiling point", when a carpenter promised to be on a certain  hour at your house in construction (with a heavy timetable about the workload) and he don't arrive even after one or two hours...that I really call "patience"...
We have also an expression: "you have to have patience with that man" meaning to have restraint with that man, even if you are in your thoughts nearly strangling him...

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 14 Sep 2018, 22:29

And LiR, nearly the whole evening busy with "constructing" a message on the French messageboard:
http://passion-histoire.net/viewtopic.php?f=60&t=40954&start=15

Kind regards from Paul.
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Fri 14 Sep 2018, 22:39

Well, "temperate" and "temperance" are different words, one being an adjective and the other a noun.  Shakespeare's sonnet 18 (as folk probably already know) runs (well the first two lines do):-

"Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate".
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 15 Sep 2018, 05:05

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
Well, "temperate" and "temperance" are different words, one being an adjective and the other a noun.  Shakespeare's sonnet 18 (as folk probably already know) runs (well the first two lines do):-

"Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate".

Dear LiR,

Do not overestimate - all - of us, I am one of these mostly conversant with only the titles of - some of - the works of WS.
My favourite being "Much ado about nothing", when commenting on the implementation of 'new' policies in local and national politics.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 15 Sep 2018, 11:30

Dear Nielsen, your English seems to be better than mine...
https://www.dictionary.com/browse/much-ado-about-nothing

I only read about Shakespeare from the works we had to "do" in classroom as Macbeth and all that stuff...what a gap with the English speaking ones overhere...I hope they are aware of the gap... Wink ...

Kind regards to you from Paul.
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 15 Sep 2018, 12:33

My tarpaulin has come (the one being delivered).  It's heavy (I've not unpacked it).  I've been busy doing some audio typing.  It's typing a 3-way conversation and not very clear speech.  It's a slog so I've come over to Res Hist for 5 minutes or so.  Paul on the map you kindly provided on the Germanic/Romance border thread I recognised "Oudenard" (sp?) from school days - one of Marlborough's victories (in the time of Queen Anne - his wife was as thick as thieves with Queen Anne for a time, but then they fell out).  At school we used the nemonic B-R-U-M - (Brum being a shortened name for Brummagem i.e. Birmingham) for Blenheim, aka Blindheim in Bavaria, Ramilles, Oudenarde and Malplaquet - to remember Marlborough's main victories (well they were victories as far as the English were concerned anyway).

I couldn't quote Master Wobbleweapon's sonnet 18 but I tend to remember it (in the sense of knowing of it) because of the line "Rough winds do blow the darling buds of May".  In the UK we quite often get "rough winds" in May.  the writer H E Bates also used the title The Darling Buds of May to write about a family in rural Kent, the Larkins.  It was made into a TV series in the early 1990s and starred a couple of stalwarts of British TV, David Jason (Del Boy from "Only Fools and Horses") and Pam Ferris.  It was also the series that made Catherine Zeta Jones well known at least in the UK.  (I sometimes see her name written as Catherine Zeta-Jones but as Zeta is a forename it doesn't seem that it should be hyphenated - unless she changed it by deed poll).
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Nielsen
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 15 Sep 2018, 12:43

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
....

I couldn't quote Master Wobbleweapon's sonnet 18 but I tend to remember it (in the sense of knowing of it) because of the line "Rough winds do blow the darling buds of May".  In the UK we quite often get "rough winds" in May.  the writer H E Bates also used the title The Darling Buds of May to write about a family in rural Kent, the Larkins. 
...

I think you may be a few yards to the windwards of me, Lady, unless you're thinking of the esteemed PM of your country, when mentioning "rough winds in May" and "The Darling Buds of May", and even then I'd be in for some hard seas?

Perhaps I'd better get me coat.
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 15 Sep 2018, 13:03

It took me a short while to appreciate that you were joking, Nielsen.  I can remember a particularly blustery day in May when I was but a lass and a lilac bush was being buffeted.  My father said "Rough winds do blow the darling buds of May".  Though he tended more towards the mathematical*, well he taught maths, but he did know some English literature.  Mrs May is beleaguered at the moment but I prefer her to BoJo**, but that's an opinion.

* I didn't inherit his ability - I can work out maths with pen and paper but I'm not one of those who can do things quickly in his/her head. I know the right buttons to push on a calculator or computer though.

** Boris Johnson.

If Temperance was here she might provide a copy of Shakespeare's sonnet 18 in quotes and italics but as it's casual me all I'm providing is a link.  www.shakespeare-online.com/sonnets/18.html
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sat 15 Sep 2018, 21:43

Transferred comment to another thread but this can perhaps be a placeholder till I have something pertinent to put in this thread.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 16 Sep 2018, 14:41

@LadyinRetirement wrote:
I have heard the phrase "diamond in the rough" of course.

And that's not to mention 'polished rice'. I'm currently faced with a puzzle regarding rice pudding. In the olden days (i.e. about 2013) one could pop down (with or without a weasel) to the grocer's or supermarket and buy half a pound of tuppenny rice along with half a pound of treacle etc. Now it seems that shops no longer sell 'pudding rice' so one is left guessing which is the best strain of rice for making rice pudding. A quick look online is no help and just throws up more questions than answers. Some people suggest Bomba (i.e. Valencia or paella rice) while others suggest Arborio. Some say Carnaroli while other swear by Basmati. Then there are those who say one can use any short grain rice and others still who say just use any rice.

Even Premier Foods (the makers of Ambrosia Creamed Rice) are no help. Their website simply refers to 'pudding rice':

Ambrosia Centenary

I did learn from that web-page, however, the interesting fact that Ambrosia Creamed Rice is actually cooked in the tins - i.e. the uncooked rice and milk is put in the tins, the tins are sealed and then heated. Presumably the labels are then put on after cooling.

But which is the best rice for making rice pudding - any advice?
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 16 Sep 2018, 16:52

I always used 'pudding rice' but if as you say that no longer seems obtainable, I guess any short-grain white rice would do like a risotto or paella rice.

Old cookbooks didn't seem to specify the rice either.

'The Forme of Cury' (circa 1395) just has,
For to make a Potage of Rice
- Tak rice and les them and wasch þem clean and seth them tyl þey breste and þan lat þem kele and seth
þan cast þer'to Almand milk and colour it wyth saffron and boyle it and present it forth.

Robert May in 'The Accomplisht Cook' (1685) says,
To make Rice Puddings
- Boil your Rice with Cream, strain it, and put to it two penny loaves grated, eight yolks of eggs, and three whites, beef suet, one pound of Sugar, Salt, Rose-water, Nutmeg, Coriander beaten, &c.


Hannah Gasse in 'The Art of Cookery, Made Plain and Easy' (1747) gives three recipes but all just using "rice".
To make a Rice-Pudding.
Take a quarter of a pound of rice, put it into a sauce-pan, with a quart of new milk, a stick of cinnamon, stir it often, to keep it from sticking to the sauce-pan. When it has thick, pour it into a pan, stir in a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, and sugar to your palate, grate in half a nutmeg, add three or four spoonfuls of rose- water, and stir all well together; when it is cold, beat up eight eggs, with half the whites, beat it all well together, butter a dish, pour it in and bake it. You may lay a puff-paste first all over the dish. For change put in a few currants and sweet meats, if you chuse it.
A second Rice Pudding - Get half a pound of rice put to it three quarts of milk, stir in half a pound of sugar, grate a small nutmeg in, and break in half a pound of fresh butter a dish, and pour it in and bake it. You may add a quarter of a pound of currants for change. If you boil the rice and milk, and then stir in the sugar, you may bake it before the fire, or in a tin oven You may add eggs, but it will be good without.

A third Rice Pudding - Take six ounces of the flour of rice, put it into a quart of milk, and let it boil till it is pretty thick, stirring it all the while; then pour it into a pan, stir in half a pound of fresh butter, and a quarter of a pound of sugar; when it is cold grate in a nutmeg, beat six eggs with a spoonful or two of Sack, beat and stir all well together, lay a thin puff-paste on the bottom of your dish pour it in and bake it.

While the redoubtable Mrs Beeton in 'The Book of Household Management' (1861) also gives several recipes, including this one, but again doesn't specify the type of rice.
Baked Rice Pudding
Ingredients: 1 small teacupful of rice, 4 eggs, 1 pint of milk, 2 oz. of fresh butter, 2 oz. of beef marrow, ¼ lb. of currants, 2 tablespoonfuls of brandy, nutmeg, ¼ lb. of sugar, the rind of½ lemon.
Mode: Put the lemon-rind and milk into a stewpan, and let it infuse till the milk is well flavoured with the lemon; in the mean time, boil the rice until tender in water, with a very small quantity of salt, and, when done, let it be thoroughly drained. Beat the eggs, stir to them the milk, which should be strained, the butter, marrow, currants, and remaining ingredients; add the rice, and mix all well together. Line the edges of the dish with puff-paste, put in the pudding, and bake for about ¾ hour in a slow oven. Slices of candied-peel may be added at pleasure, or Sultana raisins may be substituted for the currants.

Perhaps the reason Mary Jane refused her rice pudding was because it was the wrong sort of rice, "Oh no, nanny's made it with arborio rice ... yet again!"

What is the matter with Mary Jane?
She's crying with all her might and main,
And she won't eat her dinner - rice pudding again.
What is the matter with Mary Jane?

AA Milne 'When we were very young' (1924).


Last edited by Meles meles on Mon 17 Sep 2018, 08:22; edited 1 time in total
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PaulRyckier
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 16 Sep 2018, 21:45

MM, I knew it. One had to ask it to you.

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Sun 16 Sep 2018, 22:07

Thanks for those pointers Meles.

I felt a bit like Mary Jane (or maybe Goldilocks) because the pudding I made earlier this evening was a bit too sweet for my taste. Inspired by Hannah Gasse's second recipe I threw in a handful of sultanas which probably tipped the balance. Normally I follow a much more basic recipe. I'm surprised to see that she, Robert May and Mrs Beeton also all put eggs in theirs. Oh, no, no. But there must be so many different recipes when one thinks about it. Robert May using bread crumbs and Hannah Gasse using rice flour would suggest a very thick end product with a consistency, perhaps, similar to that of bread-and-butter pudding.    

I'm also intrigued by the Forme of Cury recipe. Almond milk? One wonders if that is milk flavoured with almonds or else a 14th century version of the vegan product popular today. Does 'breste' mean swell up? And what does 'kele' mean - to simmer?

P.S. In the end I used paella rice which worked okay.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 17 Sep 2018, 08:21

Fourteenth century almond milk was generally just a fairly thick creamy mix of finely-ground almonds and water, so a milk/cream substitute only in so far as it was a tasty thickening/binding agent. It didn't usually contain any milk as it was primarily of use on obligatory fast days, ie about a third of the days of the year, when no meat or dairy was permitted ... nor eggs, and I notice that the recipe is coloured with very expensive saffron rather than cheaper egg yolks. But expense wasn't a problem for the author(s) of 'Forme of Cury' as their day job was cooking for Richard II.

'breste' or 'berste' - the e and r swapped places as Middle English developed into more modern English - means 'burst' or as you correctly guessed, to swell-up and soften.

'kele' mean to cool - "and seth them tyl þey breste and þan lat þem kele þan cast þer'to Almand milk and colour it wyth saffron and boyle it and present it forth." - ie. seeth (simmer) them until they burst and then let them cool then cast/add thereto almond milk and colour it with saffron and boil it and present it forth.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Mon 17 Sep 2018, 10:22

Does the disappearance of pudding rice mean more people are buying their rice pudding ready made rather than cooking it from scratch?  Surely if there was a market for something the supermarkets and smaller shops would be pleased to stock it?  I must admit I haven't cooked a rice pudding from scratch for a long time.  It was never my favourite "afters" but since I've had to keep off gluten rice is one of the  cereals I can take but I tend to use it for savoury items (often just as a change from potatoes).
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Tue 18 Sep 2018, 13:22

Sorry, I am going to be of absolutely no assistance to Vizzer about rice here - yes, I know on that matter I'm as useful as a chocolate teapot.

A few days ago I mentioned Shakespeare's sonnet no. 18 and have found a clip where David Tennant speaks it.  I apologise that it is not of brilliant quality because it is a clip of somebody watching DT on a smartphone (I think).  It's one of the sonnets that Master Wobbleweapon wrote for a young man rather than his dark lady.  I remember being surprised by a lecturer many years ago asking the group (over a different sonnet but one dedicated to the young man nonetheless) "Do you think Shakespeare was bisexual?".  I must admit I'd never thought about it.  I know there is another school of thought that holds Shakespeare might have had a paternal feeling for the unnamed young man (his own son having died).  I doubt we'll ever know.  Another William (Wordsworth) was never my favourite poet but in one of his works he made a point that sometimes if poems are over analysed "..we murder to dissect".  From what I recall WW didn't like his time at university.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 19 Sep 2018, 13:25

I was just thinking about how much broadcasting has changed in my lifetime.  Admittedly when my parents first purchased a small "haunted fish tank" there was no overnight TV (even the radio used to close down after the Shipping Forecast) and children's TV was about one hour in length.  There used to be relatively intelligent programmes such as The Brains Trust.  There was Twenty Questions on the wireless though I wasn't so keen on that.  I'm sure Freddie Grisewood (the chairman) was a perfectly nice gentleman in real life but when he told anecdotes it was always along the lines of someone speaking to him and addressing him as "Sir" (it was my Dad that noticed that everybody called him "Sir" in the anecdotes).  There were plenty of daft programmes of course.  I haven't tuned into Question Time for a heck of a long time but it doesn't appeal to me - and I can't help it but I loathe Grand Designs.  Is it just me, or has daytime TV become lacklustre?  How many programmes about antiques, about going to auctions, about buying a house in the country (before the nearby town expands and that bit of country isn't country any longer) or about cooking etc. are needed?  Or am I just becoming "grumpy old woman"?  Then again, if the TV shows are bad I have no excuse for procrastinating about doing my housework.
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PostSubject: Re: The Tumbleweed Suite   Wed 19 Sep 2018, 13:32

The Brains Trust came into my thoughts because I'd read something about Helena Bonham-Carter taking over the role of the late Princess Margaret in The Crown and Wikipedia informed me HBC was the granddaughter of Violet Bonham-Carter who I remember from The Brains Trust.  I hadn't realised that an aunt of HBC had married Jo Grimond who of course was the leader of the Liberal Party for some time.
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