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 War of the Worlds

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Triceratops
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PostSubject: Re: War of the Worlds   War of the Worlds - Page 2 EmptyFri 18 Dec 2015, 09:27

TV adaptation  on the cards;

WOTW-TV
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PostSubject: Re: War of the Worlds   War of the Worlds - Page 2 EmptyWed 01 Mar 2017, 09:40

This Saturday(04/03/17) afternoon at 2.30pm, part one of a two part adaptation of Wells' novel on Radio 4.
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PostSubject: Re: War of the Worlds   War of the Worlds - Page 2 EmptyThu 05 Oct 2017, 14:10

I've never seen this. History Channel's Great Martian War of 1913-17:



WW1 footage intercut with digitised Martians. ( well I hope they're digitised )

PS this is a trailer from years ago, it is not on at 8pm tonight.
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PostSubject: Re: War of the Worlds   War of the Worlds - Page 2 EmptyWed 11 Apr 2018, 10:57

The Beeb are making a version:

BBC: War of the Worlds

1914 uniforms ????????????
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PostSubject: Re: War of the Worlds   War of the Worlds - Page 2 EmptyThu 17 Jan 2019, 13:43

Still waiting for these bods to appear on TV:

War of the Worlds - Page 2 War-of-the-worlds-bbc-1547551337.jpg?crop=0.877xw:1.00xh;0

It must be on it's way as the Beeb have been advertising it in a new Drama advert, and the DVD is listed for pre-order on Amazon.
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PostSubject: Re: War of the Worlds   War of the Worlds - Page 2 EmptyThu 17 Jan 2019, 14:09

Collection of sundry tripods and war machines:

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PostSubject: Re: War of the Worlds   War of the Worlds - Page 2 EmptyMon 25 Mar 2019, 13:47

Still waiting !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:

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PostSubject: Re: War of the Worlds   War of the Worlds - Page 2 EmptyMon 25 Mar 2019, 13:52

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PostSubject: Re: War of the Worlds   War of the Worlds - Page 2 EmptyWed 04 Dec 2019, 19:24

@Triceratops wrote:
The Beeb are making a version:

BBC: War of the Worlds

I not sure what to make of the drama series now that it has completed its broadcast run. Overall I'd like to say that the BBC made a good fist of it. My main interest, however, was to see how they handled the novel’s Chapter Seventeen The Thunder Child and I have to say that that was botched. The main point of the Thunder Child episode is that the ship was torpedo ram. H.G. Wells writes:

The Thunder Child fired no gun, but simply drove full speed towards them. It was probably her not firing that enabled her to get so near the enemy as she did. They did not know what to make of her. One shell, and they would have sent her to the bottom forthwith with the Heat-Ray.

Yet the series producers had the warships all firing at the tripods immediately on sight. None of the ships was identified by name and none was torpedo ram. Wells also says that the Martian Fighting Machines were:

standing so far out to sea that their tripod supports were almost entirely submerged. Thus sunken, and seen in remote perspective, they appeared far less formidable than the huge iron bulk in whose wake the steamer was pitching so helplessly. It would seem they were regarding this new antagonist with astonishment. To their intelligence, it may be, the giant was even such another as themselves.

The drama producers, however, had the ships firing ship to shore and bringing the tripods down while they were still on land. Oh dear.

Away from the television series, criticism has sometimes been levelled at Michael Trim, Geoff Taylor and Peter Goodfellow (who created the iconic artwork on the album of Jeff Wayne’s 1978 musical version) for depicting the ship as a two-funneled pre-dreadnought such as a Swiftsure-class or a Canopus-class battleship rather than as a one funnel torpedo ram like HMS Polyphemus:

War of the Worlds - Page 2 1dfb9138b7985f873716719f4febdcff

Yet in the novel Wells does describe Thunder Child as having ‘twin funnels’. In this it would more closely have resembled the torpedo ram KDM Tordenskjold of the Royal Danish Navy. Translated as 'thundershield' it was built in 1882 it had 2 funnels raised on it lengthwise:

War of the Worlds - Page 2 Tordenskjold(1880)-1

(Torpedo ram of the Kongelige Danske Marine named after the 18th century Norwegian admiral Peter Tordenskjold)

Having two funnels, however, is not necessarily the same thing as having ‘twin funnels’ as specified by Wells. Having twin funnels (i.e. funnels abreast) was a feature of the Majestic-class battleships including the appropriately named HMS Mars built in 1896:

War of the Worlds - Page 2 Large_000000

(HMS Mars belching enuff black smoke to make a Martian’s eyes smart)

It’s also worth noting that nowhere in the novel does Wells use the prefix ‘HMS’ when referring to Thunder Child. Neither does he state which country’s fleet she belongs to. He does say of the ironclads at the scene that they were part of the ‘Channel Fleet’. So presumably they’re British. He does, however, mention the multi-national make-up of fishing vessels in the Thames Estuary – ‘English, Scotch, French, Dutch, and Swedish’. The word Danish, however, is conspicuously omitted from that list. Mmm. I would guess that Wells imagined the Thunder Child as being a sort of cross between HMS Mars, HMS Polyphemus and KDM Tordenskjold. A formidable literary creation in any event.
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PostSubject: Re: War of the Worlds   War of the Worlds - Page 2 EmptyWed 04 Dec 2019, 20:22

The French Navy also had some hefty barbette warships at about the same time (or a decade earlier: 1880s rather than 1890s) which sported rams, twin, side-by-side funnels and no primary, centre-line gun-turrets, eg the Dévastation and the Amiral Duperré:

War of the Worlds - Page 2 Devastation
La Dévastation

War of the Worlds - Page 2 Amiral-Duperr-ship-model
L'Amiral Duperré

Unlike the ships of other navies at the time, French warships usually had a massive superstructure and a very pronounced tumblehome: they look rather like floating tenement blocks or factories and must have rolled terribly in rough seas:

War of the Worlds - Page 2 Marceau
Le Marceau
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PostSubject: Re: War of the Worlds   War of the Worlds - Page 2 EmptyThu 05 Dec 2019, 09:52

When writing 'War of the Worlds' HG Wells was surely also influenced by the novella, 'The Battle of Dorking: Reminiscences of a Volunteer', written in 1871 by George Tomkyns Chesney. 

Like WOTW, 'The Battle of Dorking' is a hypothetical invasion story (of Britain by a German-speaking European nation), but with a serious political 'message' about the then parlous state of the British army: it was written immediately following the sudden defeat of France by Prussia. But even Chesney could not realistically imply any great weaknesses in the Royal Navy of his time. Although the RN had not had to fight any major fleet battle since Trafalgar in 1805, successive governments had maintained generous investment in ship-building and technological improvements, and so towards the end of the century Britain's navy was equal in numerical strength to any two other powers combined.

Accordingly Chesney had to find a way of plausibly neutralising the British navy so that the thrust of his story could rapidly move onto land and the critical engagement at the titular Battle of Dorking. He does this by having the fleet dispersed around the globe due to various local threats, in India, North America, the West Indies and Ireland, and additionally by the main fleet being lured to the Dardenelles after a cunning ruse by the enemy. Even so he then - just like with HG Wells' martian invaders - has the remaining home fleet unexpectedly liquidated in the Channel by a devastating secret weapon, 'the fateful engines':

"So far all had been expectancy, then came the first token of calamity. "An ironclad has been blown up"--"the enemy's torpedoes are doing great damage"--"the flag-ship is laid abroad the enemy"--"the flag-ship appears to be sinking"--"the vice-admiral has signalled to"--there the cable became silent, and, as you know, we heard no more till, two days afterwards, the solitary ironclad which escaped the disaster steamed into Portsmouth.

Then the whole story came out--how our sailors, gallant as ever, had tried to close with the enemy; how the latter evaded the conflict at close quarters, and, sheering off, left behind them the fatal engines which sent our ships, one after the other, to the bottom; how all this happened almost in a few minutes. The Government, it appears, had received warnings of this invention; but to the nation this stunning blow was utterly unexpected."
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