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 Historical TV and Radio.

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PaulRyckier
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Tue 24 Oct 2017, 22:45

That's seems very interesting Ferval.

I did already research overhere in a thread, if I recall it well, "Kings and Gods" and also for Zoroasterianism and the Cathars (albigenses). And on the old Beeb for the copmparison between Christianism and Zoroastrianism...
I am looking forward for it. And yes the audio can we receive here in Belgium not the visual...

Thank you for mentioning it, while here I look only to ARTE or to the BBC if something interesting is announced.

Kind regards from Paul.
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Triceratops
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Wed 25 Oct 2017, 09:43

This is being shown on Saturday nights on BBC 1:



fairly odd for BBC to show a major drama production on a Saturday. By 9pm, an alcohol induced haze means the most I can cope with is the football.
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Meles meles
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Wed 25 Oct 2017, 10:36

Gunpowder is, apparently very gruesome - with crushings, beheadings and disembowlings being shown in all their g(l)ory - and has been criticised as being unnecessarily and gratuitously violent.

Yes, Gunpowder is brutal and sickening. Just like 17th-century Britain
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Fri 27 Oct 2017, 11:30

Starting tonight on Channel 5;

8 days that made Rome

First episode is about the Battle of Zama.

Looks like there may be a load of dodgy reconstructions:

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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Thu 08 Feb 2018, 12:24

On BBC1 from Saturday 17th February:

Troy
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Temperance
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Mon 02 Apr 2018, 14:37

A new five-part history of Britain begins tomorrow:

Cunk on Britain 10.00pm BBC2.

Cunk examines the history of these islands from earliest times to Brexit.  ("Now we've got our country back, what the hell are we going to do with it?" - a good question.) She interviews famous historians - all of whom seem a little bemused - and, as ever, asks those questions we have all pondered in our hearts, but have been too afraid to ask, even here, for fear of being thought completely stupid.

Cunk also considers "landmarks" like the Bayeux Tapestry: "just like being there, but in wool".



Last edited by Temperance on Mon 02 Apr 2018, 16:54; edited 1 time in total
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Temperance
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Mon 02 Apr 2018, 14:45

@Triceratops wrote:
On BBC1 from Saturday 17th February:

Troy


Wasn't it utter crap? Who on earth wrote the dialogue?

“How did you two get together, then?” Paris asked Menelaus about his relationship with Helen, as if he'd just strolled into the Love Island villa Shocked - more Homer Simpson than the other one, I think.
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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Mon 02 Apr 2018, 15:03

Oh, I'll give that one a miss then Temperance.  The Rome cosplay that Trike mentions from last autumn (and which somehow bypassed me) sounds fun in a not to be taken too seriously way, though.  Mind you, I haven't seen it and can't really judge.  It may have been very hifalutin'.
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Temperance
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Mon 02 Apr 2018, 15:22

I like a nice bit of hifalutin' myself - makes me a bit of a bore, I know, but there you have it. I phoned a friend last night, all excited about the BBC Easter Saturday presentation of Andrew Scott's Hamlet - which was absolutely brilliant. The bedroom scene with Gertrude was especially well done - sort of Jeremy Kyle meets Sophocles, but it worked a treat, if a bit of a harrowing treat. My friend replied no, they had not watched it, and were not intending to - Paddington Bear 2 was their evening's entertainment this Easter.

That shut me up.


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LadyinRetirement
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Tue 03 Apr 2018, 12:56

It's possible the Hamlet that was shown on the Beeb over the Easter break may still be on iplayer, Temperance, so I may still be able to catch it.  I mentioned on another thread that I saw the National Theatre's (well from the Bridge at the National Theatre) Julius Caesar on 22nd March as a belated birthday present to myself.  Well, I didn't see it in real life, I saw a broadcast version beamed to my local theatre.  I enjoyed it though - they had a female Cassius, Casca and Decius Brutus (modern dress).  Michelle Fairley who played Caitlyn (sp) Stark in GoT played Cassius.  I don't watch The Walking Dead - even this old trout has to have some standards - but David Morrissey who played the Governor in that show played Mark Antony (as in ancient Roman not as in hip-hop artist).  I did become somewhat lazy - i.e. watching things for entertainment on iplayer/YouTube rather than for learning (though the two can overlap) when I was convalescing though I don't have that excuse any more.
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Temperance
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Sun 08 Apr 2018, 08:48

Do try to catch up on Hamlet, LiR - it's better than Paddington Bear 2 - honest. Andrew Scott is the best Hamlet I've seen, I think - far better than Sherlock Holmes was in the same role.

I must be getting very old because Philomena Cunk's programme was not as funny as I had hoped, although it was good in places. The utter bewilderment of that lady from Oxford, Dr Laura Ashe, Associate Professor of Medieval Literature, as she tried to cope with Philomena's extremely embarrassing questions about King Arthur  ("King Arthur came a lot, didn't he?") seemed genuine; and Robert Peston (Political Editor of ITV News) did take seriously PC's question: "What's the most political thing that has ever happened in Britain then?" An interesting question - would perhaps make a good thread. I think Peston nearly a week later is probably still trying to formulate a reply.

The Telegraph gave the first programme (five in series) five stars which seems very generous.

I think it's the Tudors this coming Tuesday...
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Thu 12 Apr 2018, 15:47

MM (on another thread) wrote:
 



Only I've never found anything that Philomena Cunk presents as remotely funny.



Wow - what a put-down! Philomena is my heroine - the thinking person's idiot. I love her and the way she takes the p*ss out of the educated BBC elite. Sort of Bolton's revenge on Jeremy Paxman and his mates.

Tuesday's episode was much better than episode one. Her summary of Elizabeth I's religious policy was not without merit, I thought: "Elizabeth I allowed her subjects to practise whatever religion they liked, as long as they pretended to be C of E when asked - a bit like middle-class people do when they want their kids to go to a posh school."

Professor Ashley Jackson (Imperial and Military History at King's College, London) actually seemed to intimidate Philomena. She wouldn't mess about too much in his class. No embarrassing questions about King Arthur's ejaculatory prowess for this historian - just a quizzing about Sir Walter and root vegetables. I'm sorry, MM - I obviously have a puerile sense of humour - but when she asked Jackson: "When Sir Walter Raleigh first saw potatoes, was he scared?"  I really did laugh.

Jackson, quite unfazed, gave her a stern look and told her: "I think that when Sir Walter Raleigh first saw potatoes - not that we have any documentary records of the moment when he first beheld a potato or a field of potatoes - I do not believe he was scared: this was a buccaneering character and I think he was able to take on - erm, erm - his emotions when engaging with potatoes at first sight."

Philomena seemed pleased with his response; she nodded and looked impressed.

I also liked her comment about the Gunpowder Plotters. It is no wonder they all got caught as the artist of the famous image shown below stupidly put all their names on the picture. Which was, when you think about it, a pretty dumb thing to do.






She's not as daft as she looks. I'll check out what Philomena told the Guardian about the advantages of being stupid. I remember I posted it ages ago on Saint Paul's thread.


EDIT: Here is what I posted:

I wrote:


One last thing - just for the record. Diane Morgan, the creator of our much-loved Philomena, said in an interview for the Guardian: “It’s like wearing a suit of armour. If you’re Cunk, nothing can hurt you."

Not a learned comment about Saint Paul, I'm afraid, but nevertheless there is wisdom in Morgan's remark. Stupidity has its uses.

It does indeed, especially when people are trying to hurt you.
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Priscilla
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Fri 13 Apr 2018, 16:56

Oh MM, so sorry you do not find Clunk amusing - it's embarrassing in its humour because so much of her stuff is the sort of thing that onee has heard or seen - especially as a teacher. At fountains Abbey I was asked why people had built ruins, from exam answer sheets I found out that some one thought William Wordsworth wrote Romeo and Daffodil, that Everest was first climbed by HIllary somebody and sherpa Ruyard Kipling and on and on. What ever had I been paid for? You may well ask. And it is from the questions at the end of what you though was a pretty good lesson  that make you realise it wasn't perfect by a long mark. I think the experts handle it quite well keeping face, voice and demeanor calm - I couldn't always quite do that having a very low humour threshold.

Cunk facing the experts - rather like me confronting nord on logic - makes one squirm because it really is the sort of thing that happens........ ask any National trust room sitter what is the daftest question they have been asked; this makes their day to relate.

Of Cunk, I doubt I will ever think of this Tudor event again other than the time when That Spanish woman Amanda took the  ships to attack Elizabeth One and who Drake beat when he had finished playing with his balls. 

I wondered what my more serious husband would make of it - and noted him smiling throughout the last silly episode. I do hope she does philosophy................
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Sun 20 May 2018, 20:12

Misha Glenny’s ‘The Invention of ...’ series returns to BBC Radio 4 with:

The Invention of the Netherlands

If it’s anything like the previous series then it should be excellent. Those previous series have also been made available on the BBC iPlayer for anyone who missed them when they were first broadcast:

The Invention of Germany (2011)

The Invention of Spain (2012)

The Invention of Italy (2013)

The Invention of Brazil (2014)

The Invention of France (2015)

The Invention of America (2017)

(The Invention of the Netherlands starts tomorrow Monday 21 May @ 20:00pm BST.)
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Mon 21 May 2018, 20:07

@Vizzer wrote:
Misha Glenny’s ‘The Invention of ...’ series returns to BBC Radio 4 with:

The Invention of the Netherlands

If it’s anything like the previous series then it should be excellent. Those previous series have also been made available on the BBC iPlayer for anyone who missed them when they were first broadcast:

The Invention of Germany (2011)

The Invention of Spain (2012)

The Invention of Italy (2013)

The Invention of Brazil (2014)

The Invention of France (2015)

The Invention of America (2017)

(The Invention of the Netherlands starts tomorrow Monday 21 May @ 20:00pm BST.)


Vizzer, just lost my message...

Start again:

Vizzer,

thank you for this survey and yes BBC Radio 4 is known for its quality. I have not heard an episode yet, but are they speaking about "le roman national" (the national myth) or something others? Dare they start an episode about Belgium? Wink ....
Coincidentally I just was in the middle of a subject about the construction of the Belgian national myth, the Flemish one and as reaction the Walloon one...
http://historum.com/european-history/135677-belgium-frankish-belgic-dutch-4.html

Kind regards from Paul.
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PaulRyckier
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Mon 21 May 2018, 23:01

Vizzer,

have now heard the episode about "the Netherlands"...you understand better English than I . If you want to listen to that episode.
What "Netherlands" to start with? the Low Countries? the Dutch republic? the Kingdom of The Netherlands? They speak sometimes about Belgium, but Belgium didn't exist in that time, it were the Spanish Netherlands or the Southern Netherlands...
As you hear the Dutch (I mean the nowadays inhabitants of The Netherlands) speaking in the episode it is as if the Dutch let the Southern Netherlands to the Spanish...They speak of the Union of Utrecht and then you would think that they are talking about the nowadays Netherlands, but if you think that they are talking about the Low Countries, The Netherlands, the 17 provinces, then they have also to speak about the Union of Atrecht of the Southern provinces, the later Southern Netherlands,the later Austrian Netherlands, the later Belgium.

Throughout the episode you are wondering if they speak about the Netherlands, the Low Countries or about the Dutch Republic, the later Kingdom of the Netherlands..

And that Orange Fever only emerged in the 19th century or was it in the 20th?, as something to compare with the British oddities as seen last week. And William of Orange his "orange" was of course from his possession in the French Orange (with the "g" of Georges, hmm I mean the French Georges).

No, poor history writing (speaking) in my opinion.
If they want to speak about the Netherlands, the Low Countries, they have at least then to consult Dutch and Belgian universities or at least read some serious historybooks...
If they want to speak about the invention of the kingdom of The Netherlands, they have to make it clear, undistinguishable, from the beginning in my opinion.

That's all for this evening...

If someone can write to the BBC... Wink


Kind regards from Paul.
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PaulRyckier
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Mon 21 May 2018, 23:12

Addendum

I used "undistinguishable"...I wanted to say: something that not can be misunderstood...
but seen now that that is not the appropiate term...
it has to be: unambiguously

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Fri 25 May 2018, 23:40

Vizzer,

thinking I was to harsh to you and too harsh to the Misha Glenny I heard again the episode that I commented about the invention of the Netherlands...
but again I had a lot of trouble to understand it...first they start indeed about the Low Countries, the Netherlands, but after the 6th minute I had the impression that they spoke about the Dutch Republic with the Union of Utrecht and that in opposition (but that was not named) to the Spanish backed Union of Atrecht, which gradually grew to the size of the nowadays Belgium and was officially recognized by the international peace conference of Westfalen in 1648. I have again the impression that they from the 20th minute spoke still about the Netherlands, while they had to speak about the Dutch Republic instead. Then they spoke somewhere about 100,000 executed by the Spanish for their belief, while reading Geoffrey Parker's Dutch Revolt he came on something like six hundred, that's quite a difference...somewhere after the 20th minute they say: the people of the Netherlands fighting for their freedom, while they had to say in my opinion: the people of the Dutch Republic...

Perhaps they had better said the invention of the Dutch Republic or the invention of the Kingdom of the Netherlands? And start an episode about the invention of Belgium as I suggested Wink ? Or is Belgium not a country for the British? But perhaps I listened too much to Nigel Farage Wink ? Perhaps in this discussion, we Dutch speaking ones have it easier, both in Belgium and in The Netherlands, as we call The Netherlands and in French les Pays-Bas, just singular: "Nederland" Wink . And we can start "de nationale mythe van Nederland" instead of "the national myth of The Netherlands" or "le roman national des Pays-Bas" Wink

No offence minded to you Vizzer, as I so much appreciate all your interesting and knowledgeable contributions from you to this board.

Kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Mon 04 Jun 2018, 23:16

@PaulRyckier wrote:
Perhaps in this discussion, we Dutch speaking ones have it easier, both in Belgium and in The Netherlands, as we call The Netherlands and in French les Pays-Bas, just singular: "Nederland"

They touched on this is the third program. The lack of distinction in the English language between the plural and the singular here means that defining what exactly the term ‘the Netherlands’ means (in the English language at least) is tricky. Sometimes it seems to be interchangeable with the term ‘the Low Countries’ but normally it just refers to the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Geographically the Low Countries can be said to stretch from the River Somme in the west to the River Ems in the east (at least with regard to the coast). Defining the inland boundaries, however, is more problematic mainly thanks to the mighty River Rhine driving right through the middle of the whole region like a geographical coach and horses. Yet without the Rhine delta there really would be any netherlands. And even on the coast, the eastern Frisian islands off the coast of Lower Saxony are undoubtedly part of the Low Countries but are situated to the east of the mouth of the Ems. So there are no easy answers.

The series had a lot to cover. The first program was about the whole of the Low Countries and the Dutch Revolt against the Spanish in the 16th and 17th centuries. The second program looked that the Golden Age of the Dutch Republic in the 17th Century and third program was about Belgian Independence.

I learned quite a lot from them. For example (as with Misha Glenny) I had never heard of the Battle of Gibraltar 1607 in which a United Provinces fleet defeated the Spanish in their own waters which thus emboldening the Dutch to further maritime ventures. The subsequent Golden Age was so golden that more than 50% of all shipping going round the Cape of Good Hope to Asia during the 17th century was Dutch. In other words it was more than the combined total of the Portuguese, the Spanish, the French and the English etc. A quite staggering statistic.

Neither was I aware that the United Provinces (and the later United Kingdom of the Netherlands) were still so disunited that travellers still needed passports when travelling from one province to another right up until the 1820s. I also liked the fact that the program pointed out that when people talk in clichés and refer to the ‘liberal Dutch’ they actually mean the liberal Amsterdamers. The other Netherlands provinces (and even other parts of North Holland, let alone South Holland) are often actually quite conservative.

P.S. Paul - I'd never heard of the Union of Atrecht until I realised that Atrecht is the Dutch-language name for the francophone Arras which name we tend to use in English. But then I realised that i have never heard of the Union of Arras either - so thank you for that pointer.
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Wed 06 Jun 2018, 23:25

Vizzer,

excuses again for being too late to answer to serious messages, spending all my time with frivolous stuff Embarassed
Thanks for the interesting reply and will tomorrow answer in depth...
" I'd never heard of the Union of Atrecht until I realised that Atrecht is the Dutch-language name for the francophone Arras which name we tend to use in English. But then I realised that i have never heard of the Union of Arras either - so thank you for that pointer."

I can believe that...in my hurry I put "Atrecht" as we learned it at school in the Fifties...but during my research for other fora...I had the same as you...as I thought that "Atrecht" was the French "Artois" I didn't find of course nothing, until I found that "Atrecht" is in English and French "Arras" (yes the Arras of WWII)...
Due to the toponymy there are studies that indicate that the Frank language came even to the low hills of the "Pas de Calais with an Ango-Saxon pocket around Boulogne (Bonen)...I discussed it on Historum with Authun and on Passion Histoire with Almayrac. Tomorrow I will give the links on Passion Histoire as there, all the English language links are also included...I promised Almayrac to try to interest via the archaeological institute of Bruges, a professor of the university of Ghent for a study or thesis by a student...I have already the name of the professor, but by lack of time...still having some seven appartments for hire and have to refurbish now two ones for hire again...
But yes that toponomy...all names from the Germanic push in Roman territory...of course "Duinkerke" from which "Dunkerque" from which "Dunkirk"

I don't immediately find the toponymy of "Atrecht"...

See you tomorrow and kind regards from Paul.
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Thu 07 Jun 2018, 11:36

I think my next present (as in gift) from me to me (after Tim of A's book which I haven't purchased yet) will have to be a cheap and cheerful radio (so that I can listen to radio programs without being dependent on the internet (via Ethernet)).  That or one of those plug-in Wifi gizmos since the Wifi integral to my laptop has ceased to function.  I'm sure I mentioned a long time ago (so long I can't even remember the thread) that at school we touched on one of Robert Browning's poems "How They Brought the Good News from Ghent to Aix".  I did like the poem (I was at primary school at the time) but for a long time I thought the Aix in question was Aix-en-Provence rather than Aachen.  I never did find out exactly what good news "they" conveyed from Ghent to Aachen though.  Incidentally, when I had mentioned Roubaix not too long ago when we were having the signing in (to the site) issues and upon consulting a map showing said town became aware it is really close to the border with Belgium.
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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Thu 07 Jun 2018, 13:44

I've been watching Band of Brothers again, this is about the 4th or 5th viewing of the dvd.

This action features in Episode 2, the assault on the German battery at Brecourt Manor, 6 June 1944:

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PostSubject: Re: Historical TV and Radio.   Thu 14 Jun 2018, 22:24

@Vizzer wrote:
@PaulRyckier wrote:
Perhaps in this discussion, we Dutch speaking ones have it easier, both in Belgium and in The Netherlands, as we call The Netherlands and in French les Pays-Bas, just singular: "Nederland"

They touched on this is the third program. The lack of distinction in the English language between the plural and the singular here means that defining what exactly the term ‘the Netherlands’ means (in the English language at least) is tricky. Sometimes it seems to be interchangeable with the term ‘the Low Countries’ but normally it just refers to the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Geographically the Low Countries can be said to stretch from the River Somme in the west to the River Ems in the east (at least with regard to the coast). Defining the inland boundaries, however, is more problematic mainly thanks to the mighty River Rhine driving right through the middle of the whole region like a geographical coach and horses. Yet without the Rhine delta there really would be any netherlands. And even on the coast, the eastern Frisian islands off the coast of Lower Saxony are undoubtedly part of the Low Countries but are situated to the east of the mouth of the Ems. So there are no easy answers.

The series had a lot to cover. The first program was about the whole of the Low Countries and the Dutch Revolt against the Spanish in the 16th and 17th centuries. The second program looked that the Golden Age of the Dutch Republic in the 17th Century and third program was about Belgian Independence.

I learned quite a lot from them. For example (as with Misha Glenny) I had never heard of the Battle of Gibraltar 1607 in which a United Provinces fleet defeated the Spanish in their own waters which thus emboldening the Dutch to further maritime ventures. The subsequent Golden Age was so golden that more than 50% of all shipping going round the Cape of Good Hope to Asia during the 17th century was Dutch. In other words it was more than the combined total of the Portuguese, the Spanish, the French and the English etc. A quite staggering statistic.

Neither was I aware that the United Provinces (and the later United Kingdom of the Netherlands) were still so disunited that travellers still needed passports when travelling from one province to another right up until the 1820s. I also liked the fact that the program pointed out that when people talk in clichés and refer to the ‘liberal Dutch’ they actually mean the liberal Amsterdamers. The other Netherlands provinces (and even other parts of North Holland, let alone South Holland) are often actually quite conservative.

P.S. Paul - I'd never heard of the Union of Atrecht until I realised that Atrecht is the Dutch-language name for the francophone Arras which name we tend to use in English. But then I realised that i have never heard of the Union of Arras either - so thank you for that pointer.


Vizzer,

from your comments about the series I am more and more interested to see it all and comment  it to you. As the third episode about the Belgian independence...

Contrary to what I understand you said about the Low Countries, when we use "De Lage Landen" (the Low Countries) it is strictly about the former Seventeen Provinces (the Leo Belgicus) (the nowadays Benelux) But yes if you say then in French: les Pays Bas (the low countries) perhaps the difference is that they say for the nowadays Netherlands: les Pays-Bas... Wink
And already the sixtieth anniversary of the Benelux...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mshk9Ri9Pq4

Vizzer, I will try to see the three episodes and perhaps the other countries too as for instance Spain and France...but LiR pointed me recently to another interesting series starting with "the ship of state" artefact of the HRE period (the history in hundred artifacts or something like that) and other items from Triceratops too...
Will try first to decrease my backlog...
But I will try in any case to keep this interesting forum alive as a challenge to certain members, who think perhaps that without them, the forum will die...

"The subsequent Golden Age was so golden that more than 50% of all shipping going round the Cape of Good Hope to Asia during the 17th century was Dutch. In other words it was more than the combined total of the Portuguese, the Spanish, the French and the English etc. A quite staggering statistic."

Yes you are completely right. I read it all in Jonathan Israel's Dutch Republic. It is a thick volume but nevertheless interesting to read if you want to know more about the Low Countries and the Dutch Republic...
https://www.amazon.com/Dutch-Republic-Greatness-1477-1806-History/dp/0198207344


Kind regards from Paul.
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